This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #10 of the 40th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was economy.

Topics

Forestry IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Liberal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, the minister does not understand. The fact is the Prime Minister cannot be believed. He has spent three years delivering political rhetoric, but has failed to take any real steps for ailing forestry workers. He is making decisions on the fly and now he is spinning out of control.

Once again, with no plan, how can the Prime Minister be trusted?

Forestry IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Halton Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the fact is the province of British Columbia received $129 million to ensure that the forestry workers and the people within B.C. had the ability to deal with transition in these very tough times, there is no question about it.

What is really economically damaging is the coalition between the Liberals and the NDP with the veto held by the Bloc. That is economically damaging.

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, the current finance minister is taking cheap shots at Canadian women's hard-earned rights. For decades Canadian women fought for equal pay; decades.

Women are systematically denied equal pay for work of equal value, and now the Conservative economic statement validates this discrimination. Timely action means equal rights now.

Does the current government really think it is acceptable to pay women less?

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativePresident of the Treasury Board

As to that, Mr. Speaker, obviously not. That is why we are bringing in legislation, much like the proactive legislation that was passed by the Liberals in Ontario and the New Democrats in my home province of Manitoba, proactive legislation that meant women did not have to wait all the years they waited under the federal Liberal government.

We are changing that to deal with it in the context of collective bargaining so they will be able to achieve their rights in a timely fashion.

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, no matter what the minister tries to suggest, Canadian women are facing a serious rollback of rights by the Conservative government.

The government's attack on women's equality will not be forgotten just because it is scrambling to sweep a politically crass economic update under the rug.

After attacking women's rights time and time again, how does it feel to lose the confidence of women across Canada?

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativePresident of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, after almost a decade of waiting, we were able to resolve a number of pay equity complaints with the union and we were able to do it within the context of collective bargaining.

It is very important that those issues are dealt with in an ongoing timely basis, unlike the Liberals, who had to be hauled before the Human Rights Commission on a consistent basis in order to force them to pay women what they were entitled to. That was shameful and it should not happen any longer.

The EconomyOral Questions

December 1st, 2008 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Ron Cannan Conservative Kelowna—Lake Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, during a global economic crisis, the Bloc-Liberal-NDP cartel is plotting behind closed doors to cripple our economy by attacking business and imposing a new carbon tax and GST hike to hurt everyone. Even investors in markets are worried.

Listen to Eric Lascelles, of TD Securities, who said,

The inclusion of an explicitly separatist party in the ruling coalition...would likely cause some trepidation in financial markets, especially on the part of international investors...The turmoil generated by...the...new three-party coalition could prompt flight-to-safety flows...

Could the finance minister please tell Canadians the risk of a Bloc-Liberal-NDP coalition?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, what is needed is a steady, stable, long-term view. This is not a game. The jobs and savings of Canadians are at risk. We are in a period of global economic crisis and Canada is not an island. This is a not a time to panic or attack business with new punishing taxes as proposed by the NDP in the last election, or a carbon tax as proposed by the Liberal Party in the last election.

This is not a time for a huge new structural deficit of $30 billion or more as proposed by the three musketeers over there.

Equalization PaymentsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Independent

Bill Casey Independent Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, like the throne speech, last week's economic statement said that all increases in equalization payments would be capped at the rate of overall growth in the economy. This totally contradicts the October 10 side deal made with Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador. This deal has a formula that guarantees a 3.5% increase in equalization every year for 15 years.

This is the second time I have asked this. Will the minister stand and ensure that Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador have an exemption from this cap on equalization increases?

Equalization PaymentsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia, as I have assured its finance minister, will be kept whole, including the accord.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Jean Dorion Bloc Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

Mr. Speaker, the situation in Thailand is so serious that countries like France, Australia, China, Switzerland and Spain have taken steps to repatriate their citizens. In the meantime, Quebeckers and Canadians there have still not heard from their government.

When will the Minister of Foreign Affairs recognize that he must act now to implement a repatriation plan?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the embassy is working 24 hours a day to help Canadians stranded in Bangkok. We are considering all of our options, which include chartering planes to help Canadians get from Thailand to Hong Kong. This afternoon, I talked to the president of Air Canada and asked him for his support in helping consular staff get Canadians home.

The EconomyOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

John Rafferty NDP Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Mr. Speaker, while automotive plants are shutting down in southern Ontario, mills and processing plants are closing in northern Ontario.

Day after day, more layoffs and bankruptcies are announced, but the current government does not understand the needs of northern Ontario or the real economy.

Why is it that instead of protecting jobs, pensions and savings, all the current government could come up with was partisan games, the removal of labour rights and, shamefully, the denial of the needs of working families?

The EconomyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as was in the economic update last Thursday, there was an important extension of credit through the crown corporations responsible, BDC and EDC. This extension of credit will be in the neighbourhood of $3 billion.

It is like the measures we took several months ago, and some since then, to ensure that there would be adequate, available and affordable credit for Canadian businesses, whether they are in the forestry business, the auto business or any other sector of the Canadian economy.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Judy Streatch, Minister of Community Services for Nova Scotia.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I believe that the hon. member for Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord is rising on a question of privilege or a point of order.

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Bloc Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, I do have a point of order.

During the election of the Speaker, you yourself and all the other candidates for Speaker acknowledged it. As well, during the discussions involving the whips of the four recognized parties in the House, the feeling was unanimous that we had to improve order and decorum in this House. Unfortunately, we have to recognize that in these turbulent times, some unacceptable language has been used.

As proof, I would like to point out that earlier, when the leader of the Bloc Québécois asked a legitimate question, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages used the term “traitor”, followed by the surname of the member for Laurier—Sainte-Marie. We heard it clearly on this side of the House, and not just once, but three times.

This is a clear violation of Standing Order 18, which states that no member shall use offensive words in this House. I therefore ask the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages to withdraw what he said immediately.

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, it is true that at the start of question period I did say some things about the Bloc, the Liberal and the NDP coalition.

I never said the member's surname. That is not true. But if I did say something that was not within the rules, I apologize and I withdraw those words.

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Joliette also wishes to raise a point of order.

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, I wish to raise a point of order on another matter. During question period, the leader of the Bloc Québécois referred to a letter that the leaders of the three opposition parties had co-signed in 2004. I have that letter here. The NDP leader also mentioned it.

With the unanimous consent of the House, I would like to table the letter, which is dated September 9, 2004.

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Does the hon. member for Joliette have the unanimous consent of the House to table this letter?

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

No.

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

There is no unanimous consent.

Privacy Commissioner of CanadaRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I have the honour to lay upon the table the annual reports of the Access to Information and the Privacy Act of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada for the year 2007-08.

This document is deemed permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.