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House of Commons Hansard #77 of the 39th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was authorities.

Topics

Securities industryOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker NDP Bill Blaikie

The hon. Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities.

Securities industryOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Transport

On the contrary, Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has not proven anything. I repeat; this government respects provincial jurisdictions.

Again, when it comes to having a government that stands up to respect the provinces and provincial jurisdictions, people can count on us.

Securities industryOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Bloc Vaudreuil—Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, we held a debate in this House. The Minister of Finance is stepping up efforts to create a Canada-wide securities commission, which would take away Quebec's exclusive jurisdiction over this matter, and would concentrate everything in Ontario. This approach is not unlike the minister's scheme to lure turnkey projects to his riding.

Could the minister explain why, when it comes to his riding, everything is so simple, but when it comes to respecting Quebec's jurisdictions, everything becomes complicated?

Securities industryOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Absolutely, Mr. Speaker, this government will respect provincial jurisdiction. That is where securities regulation is at this point, but we heard loud and clear at finance committee yesterday of the problems facing those who are involved in the asset backed commercial paper. We do not have a system that protects our investors all across the country.

That is why the finance minister is looking seriously at this, but provincial jurisdiction will be respected.

Securities industryOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Bloc

Meili Faille Bloc Vaudreuil—Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, banks fall under federal jurisdiction, but this falls under the jurisdiction of Quebec.

Does the minister's behaviour mean that he is trying to put his own political interests ahead of Quebec's, in order to get favours from his friends on Bay Street, in preparation for his future campaign for the leadership of the Ontario Liberal Party?

Securities industryOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I will repeat that this finance minister is absolutely respecting provincial jurisdiction, including that of Quebec, most importantly, but we do need to remember that we need to protect investors across the country.

We heard from many investors, including those from Quebec, who raised concerns that exist in regard to our system right now. That is of primary importance to us: protecting Canadians.

Government ProgramsOral Questions

April 11th, 2008 / 11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, despite campaigning to clean up politics, the Conservatives are developing a disturbing pattern of patronage, political favouritism and mistrust. The latest example is a $45 million program for an ability centre, where it appears that only one organization in the whole of Canada fits the finance minister's criteria. It just so happens to be in the minister's own riding, with staff and family members on the board.

Will the minister commit today to extend the deadline to ensure that all interested groups can apply for access to this funding for this program? Will he commit to that today?

Government ProgramsOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Blackstrap Saskatchewan

Conservative

Lynne Yelich ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development

Mr. Speaker, the deadline has not even passed yet. In fact, the enabling accessibility fund, if she would like to know, will invest $45 million over three years to contribute to the cost of community based projects across Canada that help people with disabilities. All proposals will have to meet guidelines. The deadline is April 30, 2008.

Government ProgramsOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Libby Davies NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is very curious that only one group in the minister's riding seems to qualify. No wonder Canadians are losing trust in the government. Whether it is hiding immigration changes in the budget bill or film censorship, whether it is sneaking drug advertising into a consumer protection bill or insulting the Sikh community with callous remarks, the pattern is very clear.

The Conservatives promised to do politics differently but they have not, so why should Canadians trust the government when it is appointing partisan hacks and funnelling money to groups with insider connections in Conservative ridings? They have lost the trust of the Canadian people. How are they going to get it back?

Government ProgramsOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, on the accessibility fund, the deadline has not even passed. Applications have not even been filed yet. How she has decided who has already received the grant is entirely beyond me.

In terms of matters like Bill C-10, we are trying to work together with other parties in a minority Parliament. This is why we were pleased on Bill C-10 that the NDP supported the bill. In fact, the member for Winnipeg North said this in the House when she was speaking about the bill:

Today we are dealing with a bill that arises out of concerns from the Auditor General about the perpetuation of tax loopholes and tax havens.

That is why those members were supporting it. They thought it was a good thing.

Apparently they are like the Liberals and they too are changing their minds every day on where they stand on the issues.

Canada Border Services AgencyOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Thibault Liberal West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, there is a disturbing pattern arising with regard to taser use. First we see the RCMP censoring taser usage reports. Now we learn that taped footage from the tragic incident at the Vancouver International Airport last fall was erased by border officials.

What is the government trying to hide about the misuse of tasers in this instance?

Canada Border Services AgencyOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Oxford Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Public Safety has received assurances that investigators had access to and reviewed the full and complete video footage prior to it being erased.

We are, however, very concerned about this matter. The Minister of Public Safety has asked that the CBSA immediately review its procedures in these instances.

Canada Border Services AgencyOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Robert Thibault Liberal West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, the government told us that three investigations were underway about the incident at the Vancouver airport. Obviously, any video recordings of the incident should be part of these investigations.

Do the investigators have a copy of the video in question? Are there multiple copies? Or did the government officials conveniently erase evidence that could be used in the investigation?

Canada Border Services AgencyOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Oxford Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I would tell my hon. colleague again that the investigators had full and complete access to the original video footage prior to it being erased. The Minister of Public Safety has asked the CBSA to immediately review its procedure on the handling of such material.

Government PoliciesOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, tape recordings are a problem for the government, with the Secretary of State for Multiculturalism accusing the Sikh community of racism, on tape, with Senator Angus saying Conservatives are divided over Bill C-10 and censorship, on tape, and with the parliamentary secretary to the government House leader demeaning gay people, on tape. As for the Canada Border Services Agency destroying evidence of misused tasers, it was on tape until the agency got rid of it.

Is this the government strategy, deny members' own words and all that self-incrimination, destroy the evidence, and have an election before Canadians can find out the truth?

Government PoliciesOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister for Democratic Reform

Mr. Speaker, I know the hon. member has every reason for wanting to delay an election as long as possible, and I can understand why that is his view, but there is absolutely no basis whatsoever to what the Liberals say.

However, there is a pattern emerging, a pattern of a Liberal Party that has no policies, takes no position on issues, does not even bother to vote in the House and raises imaginary scandals one after another. Why? Because the Liberals have no policy, no vision. They stand on nothing that is of importance to Canadians. All they do is go around looking for some kind of imaginary scandal they can kick up to get a news hit.

Government PoliciesOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, it is obvious the government will not answer. The Conservatives deke and dodge and try to change the subject, but they are caught because they are their very own words, unmistakably, on tape.

The granddaddy of them all is the Prime Minister on tape, confirming financial considerations offered to Chuck Cadman. It is so damning because it corroborates the repeated, unwavering testimony of the Cadman family, including his widow who remains a Conservative candidate, and it is the Prime Minister live and in person.

Canadians have heard what Conservatives say behind closed doors. Why is there no accountability for it in public?

Government PoliciesOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, the accusations by the Liberals on this issue are entirely false. Do members know what else is on tape? Liberals supporting our budget is on tape. Liberals supporting our immigration reform is on tape. Liberals supporting our environment initiatives is on tape. Liberals supporting our tax cuts is on tape. I am sure CPAC can give it to them for a very good price.

I hope the Liberals will continue to support our government, on tape.

Government PoliciesOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Government PoliciesOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker NDP Bill Blaikie

The other thing that is on tape is all the yelling that is going on. I would ask people to stop that.

The hon. member for Chicoutimi—Le Fjord.

AfghanistanOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Bloc Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, at yesterday's meeting of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, General Hillier said that at the time of the first extension of the Canadian mission in Afghanistan, the government knew that an additional 1,000 soldiers were needed to do the job.

How can the government justify the fact that it hid this information from the House when it was about to vote on extending the mission? Is that not an example of this government's lack of transparency?

AfghanistanOral Questions

11:30 a.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, in fact, there are two priorities when the military embarks upon a mission: one is mission accomplishment; and one is safety of the troops. General Hillier, like all military leaders, took those two priorities into consideration.

We have been very consistent about our requests for more troops. Through the leadership of the Prime Minister and through the hard work of the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, we got that commitment in Bucharest recently. That will allow us to continue and, in fact, expand our operations in areas of governance and reconstruction.

Through the brilliant leadership of the Prime Minister and the brilliant military leadership of people like General Hillier, we will get the job done.

AfghanistanOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Bouchard Bloc Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the general's comments prove that this government has lacked transparency since long before the Manley report was released.

Is this attempt to manipulate parliamentarians not reason enough to end this mission in February 2009?

AfghanistanOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

Edmonton Centre Alberta

Conservative

Laurie Hawn ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, again, General Hillier, like any military commander, has two things in mind, mission accomplishment and safety of the troops.

The Minister of National Defence has worked together with the military leadership consistently. The Prime Minister has been well aware of all the factors that lead to the success of the mission, all the factors needed to better guarantee the success of the mission. That is why we went to Bucharest. That is why we had the Manley panel. That is why we got the extra troops. That is why we are getting the extra helicopters, the UAVs.

With the leadership of the Prime Minister on the political side and the leadership of General Hillier on the military side—

AfghanistanOral Questions

11:35 a.m.

NDP

The Deputy Speaker NDP Bill Blaikie

The hon. member for Drummond.