This week, I changed much of the tech behind this site. If you see anything that looks like a bug, please let me know!

House of Commons Hansard #39 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was producers.

Topics

Acts of BraveryStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Conservative South Shore—St. Margaret's, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize a remarkable constituent in my riding of South Shore—St. Margaret's. Captain Carl Vernon Atkinson of West Head, Cape Sable Island, has worked 50 years as a fishing captain.

During this time, Mr. Atkinson's bravery saved the lives of fellow fishermen on four separate occasions. During rough seas in the spring of 1953, he risked his own boat and crew to save a three-man crew and the boat that had foundered.

In 1955 he steered his boat between two breakers during rough seas to save the captain of an overturned boat in one of the most daring rescues every seen on the South Shore.

In 1960, while other boats remained in port due to gale force winds, Mr. Atkinson left Clark's Harbour to rescue two men in medical distress.

Finally, during a massive storm in 1968, he rescued two men whose boat had been shipwrecked.

It is an honour to recognize Mr. Atkinson's bravery as well as his 50 years as a fishing captain on the South Shore.

World Autism Awareness DayStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Liberal Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is World Autism Awareness Day, one of only three official disease-specific United Nations days. On this day, autism advocacy groups around the world are calling on their governments to take measures to raise awareness about autism, and to encourage early diagnosis and intervention.

As many of us are, I am proudly wearing the blue puzzle piece, the signature mark of Autism Speaks Canada, which symbolizes the three messages central to the autism community: compassion, inclusion and hope.

One in every 150 children is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, which makes it more prevalent than childhood cancer, diabetes and AIDS combined.

Canadian researchers are playing lead roles in many global research initiatives to help find the missing pieces of the autism puzzle. In the absence of a cure, early detection, diagnosis and interventions are key to successful outcomes.

I am proud that our Liberal leader has committed to Autism Speaks Canada in a letter, and I quote:

The Liberal Party strongly supports the initiative to develop a national strategy for autism to help provide better coordination of federal assistance and for continued research.

I encourage every--

World Autism Awareness DayStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Brome—Missisquoi.

The Gurit Company, MagogStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Christian Ouellet Bloc Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Gurit company located in Magog, which is in my riding of Brome—Missisquoi, manufactures structural foam for the wind energy industry and announced this week that it is laying off about half its employees, some 210 skilled workers. These job losses come on the heels of thousands of others in Magog's manufacturing sector since 2006.

President Obama has introduced assistance for the automotive industry on condition that they manufacture green cars. The federal government should follow suit and support green companies. I would like to point out that Gurit is the largest manufacturer in Magog and supplies clean energy companies in the wind sector.

Once again, our companies are hindered by this government's inaction and lack of appropriate and green measures in support of the manufacturing sector. It has been dragging its feet for three years while we lose jobs.

Renewable EnergyStatements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Bruce Hyer NDP Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I want to make a statement on the ecoEnergy wind program.

The Canadian Wind Energy Association has been working to extend its very successful ecoEnergy program for renewable power. This program was to run until 2011, but it is clear that its huge success has meant that it has run out of money. This has created uncertainty for the wind energy industry here in Canada.

We need leadership here in Canada on wind energy. The government must commit to new funding for this power program. It will cost $600 million to extend it for five years, but it would leverage over $6 billion in new investments in Canadian wind energy and create 8,000 new jobs.

Other countries are now leading the way on renewable power and wind energy. An investment in the ecoEnergy program today will enable Canada to effectively--

Renewable EnergyStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Nanaimo—Alberni.

Theory of EvolutionStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

James Lunney Conservative Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, recently we saw an attempt to ridicule the presumed beliefs of a member of this House and the belief of millions of Canadians in a Creator. Certain individuals in the media and the scientific community have exposed their own arrogance and intolerance of beliefs contrary to their own.

Any scientist who declares that the theory of evolution is a fact has already abandoned the foundations of science. For science establishes fact through the study of things observable and reproducible. Since origins can neither be reproduced nor observed, they remain the realm of hypothesis.

In science, it is perfectly acceptable to make assumptions when we do not have all the facts, but it is never acceptable to forget our assumptions.

Given the modern evidence unavailable to Darwin, such as, advanced models of plate tectonics, polonium radiohalos, polystratic fossils, I am prepared to believe that Darwin would be willing to re-examine his assumptions.

The evolutionist may disagree, but neither can produce Darwin as a witness to prove his point. The evolutionist may genuinely see his ancestor in a monkey, but many modern scientists interpret the same evidence in favour of creation and a Creator.

Foreign AffairsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Liberal Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, Dr. Wang Bingzhang, founder of the overseas Chinese democracy movement, was kidnapped in Vietnam in 2002 and illegally abducted into China. Following a one-day closed door star chamber proceeding, where he had no right to speak and no evidence was presented against him, Dr. Wang was sentenced to life imprisonment.

Six years ago the United Nations determined that the charges were unfounded, and this Parliament adopted a motion calling for his release. Dr. Wang, now in his sixties, continues to languish in solitary confinement in a Chinese prison, where both his health and morale deteriorate with every passing day.

His Montreal born daughter, Ti-Anna Wang, is in Ottawa today to raise awareness about the plight of her father. Indeed, it was the freedom that Dr. Wang experienced as a medical student at McGill University that impelled him to forgo his promising medical career and to dedicate himself to the cause of Chinese democracy.

The imprisonment of Dr. Wang at this point is a form of ongoing torture. His original abduction, subsequent trial and continued detention are illegal. This unjust suffering must now end. Today we join Ti-Anna Wang in calling for his release from prison and reuniting with his family in Canada.

Juno AwardsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Conservative Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, the boys from Hanna, Alberta, constituents of mine, really rocked the place at this year's Juno Awards.

Since 1995, Chad, Mike and Brandon Kroeger and Ryan Peake, Daniel Adair and Ryan Vikedal have been known as Nickelback. These local boys have rocked and rolled around the world.

At the Juno Awards, they won Best Album, Best Group and the Fan Choice Award.

I encourage all members to get a copy of Nickelback's Dark Horse album, the best album in Canada in 2008.

With Alberta know-how and musical talent honed in a small town, these boys have been rocking since they were in middle school together. They are living the dream of many aspiring young musicians in Canada and around the world.

These Canadians have made us proud and entertained us over the years with their albums All the Right Reasons, The Long Road, Silver Side Up and the State.

We wish them all the best on their North American tour and through 2009.

Quebec Adult Learners WeekStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Diane Bourgeois Bloc Terrebonne—Blainville, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to acknowledge the seventh Quebec Adult Learners Week, an initiative of the Institut de coopération pour l'éducation des adultes.

Year after year, this non-profit organization promotes and highlights adult education, both formal and informal.

More than 500 activities have been planned for this week, including creative workshops, debates, exhibits, forums, open doors, cultural visits and more. I cannot help but warmly praise this initiative, which again attests to the enthusiasm and vibrancy of the Quebec nation.

I also cannot help but hope that this government will finally stop dithering and hand over as quickly as possible the money for workforce training promised to Quebec.

TaxationStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday my colleague answered a question and the answer is vitally important to the Government of Quebec and Quebeckers, concerning the harmonization of the QST with the federal tax.

Despite the evident chaos in the ranks of the Bloc. the minister repeated the truth for Quebeckers of all political stripes.

Since the Quebec finance minister had stated that the QST was not harmonized and adjustments would be needed in this area in order to harmonize it, we have acted with true Conservative diligence, as true Quebeckers.

We promised to negotiate in good faith with the Government of Quebec on this, and that we shall.

As for the improper labels being thrown at the Quebec members of government by the increasingly frustrated Bloc members, I would like to say that I too prefer to be at the service of my constituents rather than a token on-looker.

CancerStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, cancer is a tragedy that affects too many Canadian families. On average, 3,200 Canadians are diagnosed every week with this terrible disease. Tragically, more than 1,400 Canadians will die from cancer this week.

Based on current incidence rates, 39% of Canadian women and 45% of Canadian men will develop cancer during their lifetimes. This means that every Canadian family will be affected by cancer.

Support of April as Daffodil Month will inform Canadians of what they can do to prevent cancer, fund excellent research on all types of cancer, provide support to cancer patients and their families and provide information about cancer to all Canadians.

For the government wearing a daffodil is not enough. We call upon Conservatives to fund health research, put a stop to the illicit cigarettes and honour the Prime Minister's promise to ban the flavoured tobacco products affecting our children. The government must act now.

Liberal Party of CanadaStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, imagine if a political party tells voters in B.C. that it does not want to help the auto industry, then in Ontario pretends it never has said such words. Imagine if a political party champions a job-killing carbon tax one day, then backs away from it the next. Imagine if a political party would say on the east coast that it supports the seal hunt, then back in Ottawa introduces a bill that would ban the seal hunt. Imagine if a political party went to one province and praised its natural resource industries, then went to another province and said that natural resources were basement industries.

It is actually not that hard to imagine, because they are the hypocritical views of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Pine BeetleStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, at a time when the government lectures the world for not spending enough to help its economies, the Prime Minister, at a minimum, should apologize to the forestry communities of British Columbia devastated by the pine beetle.

Pine beetle funding promised to the damaged and devastated communities more than two and a half years ago was worth less than the paper on which the press release was printed. My communities are desperate for this help to turn around their economies and save their towns. They have asked for accountability time and again from the government, and nothing.

Rather than pretend it is willing to help our communities devastated by the pine beetle, the government must own up to its commitments, show up with the money and give up this pattern of deception.

World Autism Awareness DayStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Lake Conservative Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont, AB

Mr. Speaker, today is World Autism Awareness Day. It is also now 11 years since my son Jaden was diagnosed with autism. So how can I in just one minute explain what it is like to deal with autism?

Jaden is now 13 and it has been a very difficult year for him. He is still an amazing kid, with an impact on people that I can only dream I will one day have. However, 13 years is a difficult time for any kid. It has been a particularly difficult time for Jaden, who is completely non-verbal. Jaden has an intense desire to be needed, to please anyone he comes into contact with, but this, combined with his difficulty communicating, has led to a paralyzing anxiety at times.

He is often unsure whether yes really means yes, and a no can cause a stream of literally unexplainable tears that are heartbreaking for all of us.

Families across the country deal with autism and issues like this every day. On this single day, we honour them for the selfless commitment they make to their loved ones every day of the year.

Sri LankaStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Maria Mourani Bloc Ahuntsic, QC

Mr. Speaker, in response to the conflict between the Government of Sri Lanka and the Tamil Eelam rebels, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights recently called for a suspension of hostilities to permit the evacuation of the civilian population and allow access to humanitarian aid.

Despite government designation of safe zones for civilians, repeated bombings have taken place in these zones. Over 2,800 civilians would have been killed, hundreds of them children. More than 7,000 people have been injured since January 20, many of them while in these so-called safe zones. Some 150,000 to 180,000 civilians are still trapped in a steadily shrinking area.

This violence must stop, and it is high time the Government of Canada urged the parties to sign a ceasefire agreement immediately and respond favourably to the demands of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Battle of Vimy RidgeStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff Liberal Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to mark the 92nd anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

In four days in April 1917, Canada's troops succeeded where our Allies had failed, ascending and capturing the ridge under fire. My grandfather's unit was among them.

By their sacrifice, those who fell at Vimy won the world's respect, and Canada took its place among the nations of the world. Let us never forget that this country was proud to give what it held most dear to protect the whole world.

When the cause is just and the world needs our help, Canada's answer has always been “ready, aye, ready”.

We honour the fallen of Vimy Ridge, and also of Passchendaele and Ypres, of the beaches of Normandy and, yes, of Kandahar.

We will keep faith with their valour and sacrifice. We will remember them.

Liberal Party of CanadaStatements By Members

April 2nd, 2009 / 2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Ed Fast Conservative Abbotsford, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Liberal Party voted in favour of an NDP climate change bill that would cripple our economy in the best of times, but will outright devastate it in the current global economic crisis.

This Liberal-NDP bill will put thousands of Canadians out of work and gut our manufacturing industry.

Sadly, this is the only idea ever offered up by the Liberal Party in response to Canada's serious economic challenges. The bill is as bad as the Liberals' job killing carbon tax. The bill is also a slap in the face to climate change approach put forward by both our government and the U.S. administration.

How low can the Liberals sink? Their willingness to again shack up with an NDP-Bloc coalition is a warning to all of us how shamefully desperate the Liberal Party is to get its hands on power. Canadians beware.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, on the economy, the Prime Minister says one thing outside the country and another inside to fellow Canadians.

On Fox News and CNN, he told other countries to boost their stimulus. In Canada, he said that we should not worry, that he has done enough already. Which is it? The other side can laugh but the basic story it is offering to Canadians is unravelling.

Does the government believe it has done enough for the Canadian economy?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, that is an absolute false statement. The Prime Minister said the very same thing in this House as he said in London today, as has the finance minister. They have said that the stimulus that we have put in place, which is very substantial, is larger than most OECD countries and G7 countries. The Prime Minister again today reiterated, “If we need to do more, we will”.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in London, the Prime Minister also said, “So notwithstanding that the employment effects are...becoming very real on people, the worst aspects of instability...are behind us."”. In plain English that means Canadians are losing their jobs and we are not doing anything more to help them.

Why can the Prime Minister not speak plain English? Why can he not convey any understanding of what is happening to workers? Will he or will he not offer additional measures to help them?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

And that was plain speak, was it, Mr. Speaker? I noticed that he had a little trouble getting that out.

The Prime Minister has been very clear that we put in place an economic action plan that was necessary for Canadians. Not only will it stimulate the economy but it will put money in place to retrain those who are unfortunate enough to lose their jobs.

We have extended EI by five weeks, which is very important for those who have lost their jobs. That will help bridge them through to where they can maybe find some new employment. That is critical to this government. Those people are important to us.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, hundreds of thousands of Canadians are going to lose their jobs in the coming year. Employment insurance is failing unemployed workers. The IMF has downgraded its forecasts, and the Bank of Canada is getting ready to do the same thing, yet this government is still saying it has done enough.

Is that this government's vision: more obstinate indifference?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, Canada is going through tough economic times, and we have introduced measures to help people who are losing their jobs. One of those measures extends the employment insurance benefit period by five weeks. Unlike the parties that want benefits to start and end two weeks earlier, we are proposing to add five weeks at the end. This is important, because people who lose their jobs may take longer to find new jobs. Our decision means that someone who is receiving $400 a week in employment insurance will get an additional $2,000.

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Liberal Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the head of women's affairs at the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission said that western silence had been “disastrous” for women's rights in Afghanistan. She went on to say something that is very pertinent. She said, “If they had got more involved in the process when it was discussed in parliament, we could have stopped it”.

When was the government aware of the legislation being proposed with respect to women in Afghanistan and what did it do about it when it heard about it?