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House of Commons Hansard #49 of the 40th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was regulations.

Topics

TransportationOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Transport

Absolutely not, Mr. Speaker. That is why this government, through the Minister of Industry and many others, is making substantial investments, particularly in Canada's dynamic aeronautics industry. It is an important cornerstone of the Canadian economy. It is very important obviously in the province of Quebec.

I would certainly be pleased to look at any proposal with respect to Saint-Hubert and respond to the member opposite.

Obviously, we want to ensure that infrastructure dollars are spent right across the country so they can create more jobs, more hope and more opportunity.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Devinder Shory Conservative Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of the Environment has just returned from a series of successful meetings with the G8 in Italy and in Washington for the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate.

Could the minister please explain to the House how this government is succeeding in developing a real climate change plan, unlike the former Liberal government that recklessly signed Kyoto and allowed our emissions to grow by 35%, damaging Canada's reputation as a responsible environmental steward?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, in the past 10 days I have met with every environment minister from all of the world's major 17 economies. I have also had the opportunity to meet all of the senior environmental officials in the Obama administration. We are constructively engaged in every forum and in every way.

Then we have the Liberals who support a carbon tax, who support NDP tiddlywinks bills, and now, according to the member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, support pumping raw sewage into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. These are the sum total of the Liberal policies: tiddlywinks, carbon taxes, and incremental--

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Nickel Belt.

AbitibiBowaterOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Claude Gravelle NDP Nickel Belt, ON

Mr. Speaker, AbitibiBowater's bankruptcy sent shock waves through northern Ontario towns like Iroquois Falls, putting entire communities on the brink.

However, it now seems as though Abitibi is taking its financial woes out on its former employees. Abitibi started by cutting workers' severance, then it cut early retirement packages and now it is cutting seniors off from their hard-earned pensions. Enough is enough.

When will the government finally stand up for workers and pensioners in Iroquois Falls and across the north?

AbitibiBowaterOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Halton Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the reality is that this government has been standing up for these kinds of workers and communities for a long time.

In 2008 we introduced a $1 billion community development trust and in the budget this year, we developed a further $1 billion community adjustment fund in order to help communities deal with the serious downturn that we are experiencing now.

AbitibiBowaterOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Jack Harris NDP St. John's East, NL

Mr. Speaker, we are talking about employee benefits. The workers of Grand Falls-Windsor have gone through a lot already, first with the shutdown of the Abitibi mill and then termination of severance and early retirement packages. Now they are watching their parents and grandparents being kicked off their pensions. This is the lowest of the low. Kicking seniors, some in their late 70s and 80s, off pensions is despicable.

Why will the government not stop sitting on its hands, help the hard-working people of my province and stop letting AbitibiBowater get away with this?

AbitibiBowaterOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, it is a provincially regulated pension plan with respect to AbitibiBowater. I suggest the member opposite take it up with the provincial government in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Agri-food IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Bloc Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the member for Jonquière—Alma has forcefully defended the new regulations concerning the “Product of Canada” label at the expense of his own region and its agri-food industry. For instance, the chocolate made by the Trappist monks in Mistassini, produced in Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean, can no longer be considered to be a product of Canada, because the cocoa beans and sugar it contains are imported.

Does the minister realize that his decision hurts the agri-food industry and that his stubbornness will cause irreparable harm to many producers, including those in his own riding? He should stop telling us he might make changes. He should either make them or let the real minister do it.

Agri-food IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, we believe it is important for consumers to have something to go on when buying products at the grocery store. For that purpose, we have adopted the 98% standard for products of Canada. Companies that do not meet that standard can put on their product that it was processed in Canada, using blueberries from Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean for example, or some other words to that effect.

Agri-food IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Bloc

Christiane Gagnon Bloc Québec, QC

Mr. Speaker, Biscuits Leclerc de Québec is another example of the unrealistic 98% threshold for using the “Product of Canada” label. According to the company’s vice-president of marketing, that standard is outrageous. It would cost over $300,000 to change the packaging on products that are entirely from Quebec except for the sugar and cocoa beans. The company president has written to the minister responsible for the Quebec City region and the Minister of State (Agriculture), who have not deigned to acknowledge receipt of his letter.

Is the Minister finally going to use common sense and do the only logical thing he can do, cancel this measure immediately?

Agri-food IndustryOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Jonquière—Alma Québec

Conservative

Jean-Pierre Blackburn ConservativeMinister of National Revenue and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, I would again point out that it is important for consumers to have something to go on. Consumers themselves want that. As well, we have consulted the industry and the stakeholders. They agreed that we should go ahead with this legislation. That does not mean that we do not hear comments from time to time. We are listening. In fact, I had an opportunity again, recently, to meet with some of them. We want a clear focus and we want consumers to have something to go on. We are working to achieve this.

Official LanguagesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Liberal Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, with just 288 days left to go until the Olympic Games begin, the French language is all but invisible there. An official languages committee was set up to save face. The government seems to have forgotten that French is one of two official languages both in Canada and at the Olympic Games.

Can the Minister for La Francophonie explain why, despite its commitment to promoting the Francophonie, the Canadian government is doing nothing about the lack of French at an event that will focus the attention of the entire world on Canada?

Official LanguagesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, that is just not true. Let me be clear. Every Olympic Games site, including the Richmond Oval, will have bilingual signage. The 1988 winter Olympic Games in Calgary were a big improvement over the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal, and the 2010 winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Vancouver will be a big improvement over the winter Olympic Games in Calgary.

Every single site, along with translation services, the cultural Olympiad, broadcasting, volunteers, the Internet site, the torch relay and the opening and closing ceremonies, will be bilingual.

Official LanguagesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Liberal Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, why set up an advisory panel on official languages if everything is fine in Vancouver? In February, the Conservative government cut aid to the poorest countries in the Francophonie, and now it is ignoring problems with the Olympic Games organizing committee.

The minister has done nothing to address these issues, and she is still not doing anything. Can she provide assurances to francophones that Canada is prepared to guarantee satisfactory service in their language at the Olympic Games?

Official LanguagesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, I know the Liberals are having their convention in Vancouver. Maybe the member could go and meet with the people at VANOC and recognize that everything she just said is entirely false.

The opening ceremonies and every single Olympics site will respect the official languages. There are signs all over the city of Vancouver and all the host cities in both official languages. The Cultural Olympiad, the opening and closing ceremonies, the torch relay, the 2010 Olympics and Paralympic Games will be entirely respectful of Canada's official languages.

We are getting the job done. We are exceeding the standards set by the IOC. We are respecting Canada's official languages. We are getting the job done.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Bruce Hyer NDP Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week Toronto Transit Commission awarded the largest municipal project in the country, $1.2 billion, to Bombardier in Thunder Bay. This contract will immediately create vital jobs in Thunder Bay, jobs that will help stimulate our economy now.

It is good news for Thunder Bay workers, for Toronto Transit riders and for the fight against climate change. Yet the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities has said he may not provide the federal share.

Will the transport minister commit today the federal share for this project to get it started immediately?

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, it is always very interesting to hear the New Democrats talk about the need to make investments.

This is an interesting project. Just last month the leader of the NDP stood up in the House and said that we should have a buy Canadian policy. I understand 80% of this project would not be made in Canada. It is quite interesting.

I have said to the member and to the City of Toronto that if they could bring forward a proposal of investments that could be made in the next two years, we would certainly be open to receiving it, but we do not want to stimulate the economy some time in 2019. Canadians need jobs today, and our goal is to make that happen.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Carol Hughes NDP Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, ON

Mr. Speaker, that is exactly right; Canadians do need jobs today.

In northern Ontario, local roads boards tell us that they cannot meet the government's May 1 deadline for the building Canada fund. They say that they are volunteers and do not have engineering departments or staff to meet these deadlines and they are beginning to wonder if this deadline was not done on purpose so they cannot take part in these programs.

Will the minister do the right thing for northern Ontario and extend the deadline for applications, or will the Conservatives leave northern Ontario out in the cold again?

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the first deadline is May 1. I think we have been clear that we will certainly be prepared to receive applications after that date.

The good news is that as of noon today in the province of Ontario, working with my premier, Dalton McGuinty, we have received 1,350 project proposals from more than 234 municipalities.

Municipalities are responding to the challenge. They are putting their money where their mouth is. They are moving quickly to get the job done. The hon. member can count on Dalton McGuinty and me to be there to support our municipalities.

TaxationOral Questions

April 30th, 2009 / 2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Daryl Kramp Conservative Prince Edward—Hastings, ON

Mr. Speaker, in November 2004 the Liberal leader called himself “a tax and spend Pearsonian Trudeau Liberal”. During the 2006 Liberal leadership race, he said, “We've also got to have popular, practical, believable policies that may involve some form of carbon tax”. Last December he said, “I'm not going to take a GST hike off the table”. This month he said, “We will have to raise taxes”.

Does the government agree with the Liberal leader when he says, “We will have to raise taxes”?

TaxationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Nepean—Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and to the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, last night on CBC the Liberal leader announced that he is a tax and spend Trudeau-Pearson Liberal who loves country music. That is the first of its kind of species.

No one is accusing the Liberal leader of wanting to raise taxes. We are just reading his own words, “We will have to raise taxes”. He has a right to take that position, but also a responsibility to answer the questions: which taxes, how much will they go up, and who will have to pay?

Employment InsuranceOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Gerry Byrne Liberal Humber—St. Barbe—Baie Verte, NL

Mr. Speaker, I gave the Minister of Human Resources Development advance notice of my question.

After the parents of Trooper Kyle Ricketts was denied income benefits if they went to the side of their critically injured son, injured in Afghanistan serving with the Royal Canadian Dragoons, the minister's spokesperson announced that the Ricketts case had been resolved and they would get their benefits. She also said she would ensure there were legislative changes to prevent this from ever happening again.

The minister failed on the first count. Benefits were not only denied to this soldier's parents, but they will have to pay the money back. Her promise to the parents of a critically injured soldier was a deception. Was her promise to change the EI act a deception as well?

Employment InsuranceOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Souris—Moose Mountain Saskatchewan

Conservative

Ed Komarnicki ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development and to the Minister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, we commend Trooper Ricketts for his bravery and we sympathize with his situation. Service Canada officials have made every attempt to contact the Ricketts family to clarify this situation.

I will not get into the specifics of this case, but if the member really cares about the issue, he would come and see me or the minister directly about the issue. He would not be trying to play on the backs of the family and the soldiers to try to score cheap political points.

TransportationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Bloc Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday morning Aérocentre YHU Longueuil announced a $20 million investment over three years to develop a new airport terminal at the Aéroport Montréal Saint-Hubert Longueuil (AMSL). In 2007, AMSL applied to the federal government for a grant to renovate and lengthen the Saint-Hubert runway in order to accommodate larger aircraft.

The matter has been studied at length for two years. It was even a Conservative election promise.

The minister just stated that he was prepared to consider the matter. What is he waiting for to make an announcement?