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House of Commons Hansard #114 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was right.

Topics

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Liberal Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister and his government says yes to $6 billion in corporate tax breaks, yet families in Winnipeg's north end are concerned about the government completely ignoring important issues such as youth programs and seniors pensions

In the recent byelection, the Prime Minister had a chance to justify his priorities to the people of Winnipeg North, but instead he had a meeting behind closed doors. Why was the Prime Minister scared to engage real people in Winnipeg's north end?

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, the folks of Winnipeg North know how much our government has been doing to help seniors and families.

The people of Winnipeg North also know that our bid on the F-35 planes will benefit Bristol Aerospace in Winnipeg North. They know that and they want to ensure they get the jobs and the spin-offs. They want to see those. We want to see them too. That is why we support it and so should the Liberals.

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Kevin Lamoureux Liberal Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, the government has failed the test of compassion. The Prime Minister's priorities are billions in corporate tax breaks and billions in untendered fighter jets.

Governments need to put people first, demonstrating a real interest in improving our health care system and developing more effective programs for our youth.

In Winnipeg's north end the Conservatives have failed on all fronts. How can the government explain its complete failure to improve the living conditions of our communities?

Government PrioritiesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Central Nova Nova Scotia

Conservative

Peter MacKay ConservativeMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, let me give the member a lesson about his own party.

In 1993 the Liberal Party cancelled the EH-101 contract, forcing the Canadian Forces to continue to fly ancient helicopters. It cost the country a billion dollars.

The hon. member should take time to ask a question of his own party. Why do Liberals always want to cancel, cave in and crater the needs of the Canadian Forces? That is their legacy when it comes to procurement for the brave men and women of the Canadian Forces.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

David Christopherson NDP Hamilton Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister promised not to appoint unaccountable members to the Senate, but in reality he has appointed more of them than any prime minister in our history.

Canadians are downright angry that the government is using unelected, unaccountable senators to kill legislation like Bill C-311 that was passed in the House by a majority of members representing a majority of Canadians. It is undemocratic and it is unacceptable.

When will the Prime Minister stop using the unelected, unaccountable Conservative Senate to thwart the will of the elected and accountable House of Commons?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Langley B.C.

Conservative

Mark Warawa ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal-NDP coalition bill would have forced Canada to diverge from the very similar targets that our government has with President Obama in the United States. That is a 17% reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 2020.

The coalition would lead us down a path of isolation, further economic downturn and a loss of jobs. That is not what Canadians want.

PensionsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Wayne Marston NDP Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, over a year ago I tabled a bill designed to help the disabled Nortel workers. A similar bill in the Senate was defeated by Conservative senators last night. Clearly the unaccountable senators have abandoned these workers.

The clock has all but run out for these workers. The minister has repeatedly said in the House that he would do something for them. Will he put aside his speaking points and tell the House right here, right now, what he will do for them?

PensionsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I can tell the hon. member that we on this side of the House, as I believe all MPs and senators, sympathize with the plight of these individuals, particularly those with long-term disabilities.

The fact is the solutions proffered by the NDP and proffered by the Liberals in the Senate do not help those people one iota. They do not help. They would be in court for years. That is the expert testimony that was heard at the Senate. They are not helping.

We on this side of the House are looking for solutions to help people, not engage in soulless rhetoric designed for the cameras and not for the people of Canada.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Daryl Kramp Conservative Prince Edward—Hastings, ON

Mr. Speaker, today the Federal Court of Canada ruled to uphold the security certificate of Mr. Mohamed Harkat. The reason for the judgment, Justice Noel wrote:

I find that Mr. Harkat has engaged in terrorism, that he is a danger to the security of Canada and that he is a member of the Bin Laden Network through his past work...

Could the Minister of Public Safety please tell the House how today's court ruling supports the government's approach to countering terrorism and protecting our national security?

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government is steadfast in our commitment to ensure Canadians are safe from terrorist threats.

Today the Federal Court determined that there were reasonable grounds to believe that Mr. Harkat was a threat to national security. Our priority remains taking the action necessary to ensure Canadians are safe.

InfrastructureOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac Liberal LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, the natural catastrophe that hit the lower St. Lawrence is of concern to all Canadians. People have lost everything they worked so hard for all their lives and much infrastructure was damaged and literally carried away by the water. Such a disaster had not happened since 1914.

Will the government agree to put its technical, professional, human and financial resources at Quebec's disposal in the event that the province asks for its help?

InfrastructureOral Questions

3 p.m.

Chilliwack—Fraser Canyon B.C.

Conservative

Chuck Strahl ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we share the concern for what happened in the St. Lawrence area. There is a real human tragedy there and we feel for those people.

As well, we have a relationship with the provincial government to ensure that where there is a natural disaster, or a disaster of any type in the province, a formula kicks in. There are processes where our officials work together to ensure we look after those citizens by working through pre-established terms and conditions that have been put in place with the Quebec government.

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Yvon Lévesque Bloc Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, after many years of negotiations following the 1975 James Bay Agreement, a marine region agreement was finally signed by the federal government and the Cree. With unprecedented participation, the Cree Nation voted almost unanimously in favour of the agreement, which cannot come into force unless backed by a law.

What is the government waiting for to keep its promise made to the Cree of Eeyou Istchee and introduce the bill that was supposed to have been presented in September?

Aboriginal AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Island North B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, we are in the final drafting and the member can expect that legislation imminently.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington NDP Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative government is way off track when it comes to actually protecting the environment. Yesterday, when questioned about the Edéhzhie area of the Northwest Territories, also known as the Horn Plateau, the government laughably said, “a national wildlife area designation does not preclude development”. Opening the door to resource exploitation in these protected areas has forced the Dehcho First Nation to take this government to court.

Why is the government wasting everyone's time and money through this court case? Is it another Lancaster Sound? Where is the issue? Either these areas are protected or they are not.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Island North B.C.

Conservative

John Duncan ConservativeMinister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, the member is quite correct. Where is the issue? Any plans for exploration or development would have to include measures to mitigate environmental impacts in a way that would protect the conservation values of the proposed national wildlife area. Everything is as it should be.

TaxationOral Questions

December 9th, 2010 / 3 p.m.

Conservative

Dick Harris Conservative Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, more and more Canadians are coming out against the Liberal Party's disastrous economic policies. They know the tax and spend policies of the Liberal leader will kill both jobs and the economy. The Liberal plan to target job creators with massive hikes is just the latest example. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce calls it a “disastrous idea”.

Could the parliamentary secretary tell us what employers in the forestry industry are saying?

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we all know that the Liberal leader's plan to raise taxes will simply kill Canadian jobs. It will kill economic growth. It will harm Canada's economy. The Liberal job-killing taxes are dead wrong.

The Forest Products Association of Canada, which employs hundreds of thousands of Canadians, said yesterday, “the business tax reductions...are an important part of the industry's recovery plan for the period ahead”.

Why, once again, are the Liberals threatening Canada's forestry workers and their employers?

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of the Honourable Dennis Fentie, Premier of Yukon.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

I also would like to draw to the attention of hon. members the presence in the gallery of National Chief Shawn A-in-chut Atleo, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Business of the HouseBusiness of the HouseOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Liberal Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is, as usual, addressed to the government House leader or, in his absence, the deputy leader.

I would like to ask the government what the remaining business of the week is for today and tomorrow, and, going into next week, Monday through Friday, how the government anticipates its legislative agenda moving forward.

It would be very important as well for the government take a moment to address some of the remarks made by two ministers yesterday dispatched to talk about the legislative process. We are not engaged in legislative process-making. Could the government help us and Canadians understand what the schedule is with respect to some of the justice bills on which concerns were raised yesterday? We would like to hear about those concerns, what bills specifically and how it intends to get them through the House from now until Friday.

Could he also take a moment to address whether the government will stop filibustering, in two or three standing committees, important bills that this entire House wants to see move forward?

Finally, could the deputy leader of the House address his remarks yesterday about an order paper question that consumed over 45 minutes of this House's time, instead of dealing with important legislative matters?

Business of the HouseBusiness of the HouseOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I will start with the hon. member's last question first.

The member is right, that was an extremely long question. I pointed out to this place that the Liberals were making it a common practice of writing questions that should be divided into several questions rather than just one. The question that I read into the record of this House took over 15 minutes to read. It is an attempt by the Liberal Party, continuous attempts by the Liberals, to obfuscate, to delay the proceedings of this House and to, quite frankly, impede the ability of government departments to get on with important government legislation.

Mr. Speaker, I hope that you, in your wisdom, will rule on that very important point of order as quickly as possible.

With respect to the business today, we will continue with the Liberal opposition motion and business of supply. Tomorrow we will hopefully complete the final stage of C-30, Response to the Supreme Court of Canada Decision in R. v. Shoker Act. Following Bill C-30, we will call, at report stage, Bill S-6, Serious Time for the Most Serious Crime Act.

On Monday, we will continue with any business not concluded this week, with the addition of Bill C-43, Royal Canadian Mounted Police Modernization Act, and Bill C-12, Democratic Representation Act.

On Tuesday, we would like to complete the third reading stage of Bill C-21, Standing up for Victims of White Collar Crime Act.

Next week, we will also give consideration to any bills that are reported back from committee. Further, if time permits, we would also debate next week Bill C-38, Ensuring the Effective Review of RCMP Civilian Complaints Act; Bill C-50; Bill C-51, Investigative Powers for the 21st Century Act; Bill C-53, Fair and Efficient Criminal Trials Act; and Bill C-19, Political Loans Accountability Act.

Finally, on Tuesday evening, we will have a take-note debate on the trade agreement with the European Union, and on that subject, I would ask my colleague, the chief government whip, to move the appropriate motion.

Business of the HouseBusiness of the HouseOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor ConservativeMinister of State and Chief Government Whip

Mr. Speaker, further to the comments of the deputy House leader, consultations have taken place among all parties and I am please to move:

That a take-note debate on the subject of the current negotiations to conclude a comprehensive economic and trade agreement with the European Union by the end of 2011 take place pursuant to Standing Order 53.1, on Tuesday, December 14, 2010.