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House of Commons Hansard #35 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was review.

Topics

2 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem led by the hon. member for Cariboo—Prince George.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Kamloops Art GalleryStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to pay tribute to Kamloops Art Gallery executive director Jann Bailey. Jann has been recognized by the Canadian Museums Association and will be the first recipient of the Barbara A. Tyler Award in Museum Leadership. This award recognizes an individual who has demonstrated leadership, dedication and vision in taking his or her museum to a new level of contribution to Canadian society.

Jann meets this description to a T and is truly deserving of this award. She has been the executive director of the Kamloops Art Gallery since 1987, working hard to propel the art gallery from a little-known facility located in the basement of the Kamloops Museum to overseeing the building and operation of an award-winning facility that has gained a prominent national reputation.

On behalf of the government, we thank Jann for her years of dedication to the arts community in Canada.

Airport SecurityStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Gurbax Malhi Liberal Bramalea—Gore—Malton, ON

Mr. Speaker, at a time when airport security is of particular concern for the safety of Canadian passengers, the federal government has slashed funding for airport policing.

The federal government has claimed to have made security a priority, but at the same time it has eliminated the entire $15 million funding that allows Canada's eight major airports, including Mississauga's Pearson International Airport, to hire police officers to patrol the terminals.

Since federal regulations require armed police presence in our airports, it appears that the cost will be passed on to the passengers. This is more bad news for travellers who have already been hit by the government's decision in February to increase security fees by about 50% to pay for passenger and luggage screening.

I urge the government to reduce the financial burden that it is downloading on to the passengers and to stop putting air travellers at risk.

Vietnam Day on Parliament HillStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Ève-Mary Thaï Thi Lac Bloc Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, today is Vietnam Day on Parliament Hill, organized by the Vietnamese Canadian Federation. A major forum has been organized to commemorate the 35th anniversary of the fall of Saigon and the impact of communism on Vietnam.

As the first MP of Vietnamese origin elected to this House, I am proud to be associated with and to sponsor this important day for many Vietnamese people living here, in Quebec and Canada.

Respect for human rights, the rights of workers and intellectuals, freedom of expression and religious freedom in Vietnam will be among the topics discussed today. It is essential that these issues take centre stage.

In conclusion, I would like to acknowledge the hard work the organizers of this day have put in. They have been working non-stop to promote Vietnamese culture and to defend fundamental rights in Vietnam.

Status of WomenStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis NDP Winnipeg North, MB

Mr. Speaker, in 1921, Agnes MacPhail became the first woman elected to this House. In talking about the women who would follow in her footsteps, she said, “I can almost hear them coming”. Well, there was no stampede.

Just over 30 years ago, I started working in this place with Ed Broadbent to advance the status of women in our party and in politics generally. With the help in particular of Stanley Knowles, we launched the campaign, “A woman's place is in the House-- of Commons”.

Since then women have made some progress, reaching 20%, but that is not enough. There is still no critical mass. Worse, advances made over the past 30 years are being wiped out.

The saddest moment in my 13 years here has been to see the clock turned back on pay equity and to see its elimination from the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

Today I want to thank all the women in my caucus who have supported me over these last 13 years, my leader, and women from all walks of life in this House who have been fighting the good fight for women's equality. Together we must carry on because equality is still a distant goal.

Carry on, sisters.

Cystic FibrosisStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Phil McColeman Conservative Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, in May 1959, two amazing Canadians from the riding of Brant organized a meeting of more than 100 parents of children with cystic fibrosis. At this meeting, Doug and Donna Summerhayes laid the groundwork for what would later become the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

In the early years, Doug and Donna travelled throughout Canada, often at their own expense, to raise awareness and help establish local chapters. Doug was the foundation's first president and Donna was the first editor of the foundation's newsletter.

For their continuous efforts and remarkable achievements, Doug and Donna Summerhayes were awarded the Order of Canada, Donna in 1987 and Doug in 1988.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. On this momentous occasion, I salute my friends and founding members, Doug and Donna Summerhayes, who are in Ottawa today to celebrate with the foundation this milestone achievement.

Cystic FibrosisStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal genetic disease affecting Canadian children and young adults. Currently, there is no cure.

There are over 3,600 Canadian children, adolescents and adults who live with cystic fibrosis. This year the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is investing nearly $8 million in support of cystic fibrosis research and clinical care and is supporting more than 50 top-ranking research projects.

While the advances are significant, cystic fibrosis is still taking young lives and much work remains to be done. I urge the government to give increased funding to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and to oversee new centres of clinical excellence and world-class clinical trial networks.

2010 marks the 50th anniversary of the foundation. When it was created 50 years ago, most children with cystic fibrosis did not live long enough to attend kindergarten. Today, half of all Canadians with cystic fibrosis are expected to live into their forties and beyond.

I hope members from every party will join me tonight at the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's reception to mark the foundation's 50th anniversary and the progress made in cystic fibrosis research and care.

Workplace SafetyStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Patricia Davidson Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is the 25th anniversary of the first National Day of Mourning. I speak today in the House of Commons on behalf of all Canadians for the men and women who have lost their lives in workplace tragedies.

Today we are united across party lines as we give tribute to the workers and their families who have been permanently affected by workplace tragedies. In 2009, there were three fatalities across Canada each day on average, due to workplace accidents and the effects of occupational diseases.

Canadians have a strong sense of work ethic and it is appropriate we honour those who have fallen in the line of their professional duties. These men and women have paid the ultimate price while making our communities better places to live and they deserve the honour we bestow upon them today.

I call on all hon. members to re-dedicate themselves to employees' workplace rights and to remain committed to making all Canadian work environments as safe as possible to protect workers across Canada.

Cystic FibrosisStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Malo Bloc Verchères—Les Patriotes, QC

Mr. Speaker, the 50th anniversary of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is a perfect time to pay tribute to everyone who is working to find a cure or to comfort and support those afflicted with this disease. It is also an opportune moment to emphasize the courage of those suffering from it.

I would like to acknowledge two young women in my riding who, despite having cystic fibrosis, have shown how they can flourish in activities that require lung power and enrich their lives.

Valérie Therrien, from Varennes, finds her fulfillment in singing. She shared her passion for vocal arts with us during the Festival Jeunesse when she sang Crazier. Maggie Ritchie showed off her athletic ability during the show put on by Boucherville's figure skating club. Skating to Céline Dion's hit song Vole, Maggie reminded us that, despite all of the significant advances in treatment, the battle is not yet won—life expectancy is still only 40 years.

Well done, ladies!

The EconomyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Stephen Woodworth Conservative Kitchener Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada's economic action plan is creating jobs and promoting economic growth in communities right across Canada. Since July 2009, Canada has created almost 180,000 new jobs and has seen five consecutive months of economic growth.

Canada will lead the G7 in growth in the years ahead according to institutions like the OECD and IMF. What is more, Standard & Poor's just confirmed Canada's rock solid credit rating, saying:

The ratings on Canada reflect our opinion of the country's strong public finances, its relatively diversified economy, the stability of public policy and its financial sector's soundness.... Of the other G7 countries...Canada is posting the best fiscal results.... Canada...is now well positioned to continue to outperform...

While the Liberal leader would kill jobs with massive personal and business tax hikes, our Conservative government is getting the job done and building a stronger Canadian economy.

Royal Newfoundland RegimentStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady Liberal St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, this past weekend the Royal Newfoundland Regiment's 1st Battalion celebrated the 215th anniversary of its founding and received new Queen's and regimental colours from the Princess Royal. I was honoured to participate.

The Royal Newfoundland Regiment traces its origins to 1795. The regiment was involved in the War of 1812 and played a significant role in defending southern Ontario.

During the first world war, the battalion-sized regiment was the only North American unit to fight in the Gallipoli campaign in 1915. Later in the war, the regiment was decimated at Beaumont Hamel on July 1, 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. Since then, July 1 has been marked as Memorial Day in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Like many in my province, I have a personal connection to the regiment. My grandfather was a member.

I ask all members in the House to join me in congratulating the Royal Newfoundland Regiment on its 215th anniversary.

JusticeStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

John Duncan Conservative Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians know that our Conservative government will always put the protection of victims and law-abiding Canadians before the rights of criminals.

Dangerous criminals should serve their sentences behind bars, not on our streets because of early release. Victims and police officers have repeatedly told us that releasing criminals onto our streets early has a much higher cost than keeping criminals behind bars.

The Liberals and NDP have shown that they have a fundamentally different view of what it really means to be tough on crime. While they think arsonists should be able to sit in the comfort of their homes, we do not. While they think drug traffickers should go free, we do not. While they think criminals only need to serve one-sixth of their sentence, we do not.

Canadians know there is only one party they can trust when it comes to getting tough on crime and that is our Conservative government.

Firearms RegistryStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Shelly Glover Conservative Saint Boniface, MB

Mr. Speaker, ever since the Liberal leader announced his intention to force his MPs to support the costly and ineffective long gun registry, the member for Madawaska—Restigouche has kept mum.

However, last November, when he voted to get rid of the long gun registry, the member for Madawaska—Restigouche said that hunting rifles were generally used for sport and that he could not oppose their use. He added that he was a big boy and could make his own decisions, and that he had been talking about the registry with people in his riding for five years.

It is time for the member to tell us what he plans to do. Will he make his own decision or will the Liberal leader force him to support the long gun registry? He has a big choice to make. I hope that he will listen to his constituents and vote to eliminate the long gun registry once and for all.

Workplace SafetyStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton NDP Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the NDP caucus, it is an honour to rise in this House today to commemorate the National Day of Mourning and sombre remembrance of workers killed, injured or exposed to toxins at work.

I know that all MPs will take time today to mourn the dead. However, if we really want to pay tribute to those who were killed on the job, we need to bring that same collective sense of purpose to fighting for the living. Standing in this House year after year on April 28 without committing ourselves to concrete action starting on April 29 makes our tribute today a hollow gesture.

Common sense tells us that when the minimum wage remains below a living wage, requiring many workers to work 14 hours a day, often in 2 or 3 jobs, they are less protected than a worker who is well rested. We know that unionized workplaces are safer workplaces. Unions and collective bargaining give workers some control over their workplace conditions and enable workers to protect themselves from the brutality of a workplace assault, and yet card-check certification has still not been extended to all workers in this country.

On this day of mourning, I ask all members of this House to do more than pay lip service. Do not just mourn the dead, join New Democrats in fighting for the living by turning our concern into action.

National Day of MourningStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Desnoyers Bloc Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the National Day of Mourning, marked every year on April 28, originated with the Canadian labour movement. The Canadian government declared this day the National Day of Mourning in 1991 to commemorate those whose lives have been lost or who have been injured in the workplace.

Despite sustained efforts and the successes we have seen in workplace health and safety, there are still too many people killed or injured, or who become sick, because of their jobs.

Between 2002 and 2007, the rate of disabling injuries in federally regulated workplaces increased by 5%, while the provinces managed to cut their disabling workplace injuries by an average of 25%.

Today Bloc Québécois members are paying tribute to the men and women who lost their lives and those who were injured or became sick because of their jobs, and calling on the government to work actively to improve the safety of workers under federal jurisdiction.

Workplace SafetyStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Liberal Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we mark the National Day of Mourning for those killed or injured in the workplace.

Can anyone imagine waking up in the morning, getting ready for work and asking oneself, “Is today the day I die at work?” This is the slogan for the Canadian Labour Congress' National Day of Mourning.

In 2008, over 1,000 people were killed in their workplace or from an occupational disease. Thousands more were injured to such an extent that they had to miss work. Most, if not all, of these accidents are preventable.

The government has a positive role to play in ensuring that our workplaces are safe and to enforce the law when employers are found in violation.

Today we remember those who have lost their lives or have been injured in the workplace. These people are ordinary Canadians who went to work, provided for their families and worked to make Canada a better place in which to live, work and play. This could be anyone, members of our family or neighbours.

All of us must do what we can to make our workplace even safer. I encourage all members of this House to work together in order to prevent any more of these tragic losses of life and injuries in the workplace.

National Day of MourningStatements By Members

April 28th, 2010 / 2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Limoilou, QC

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Government of Canada, I want to say that today we join with the families and workers who are mourning someone who lost their life on the job.

The best way to pay tribute to deceased workers is to step up efforts to make Canadian workplaces as healthy and safe as possible.

It was our government that brought forward tough regulations against workplace violence.

This spring and summer, we will focus on the safety of young workers to ensure that our sons and daughters understand their rights in the workplace and are confident enough to report hazardous working conditions.

My colleagues and I remember those who have lost their lives and reaffirm our collective commitment to ensure that all Canadians can return home safe and sound at the end of the work day.

National Day of MourningStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Following discussions among the representatives of all parties in the House, I believe there is agreement to observe a moment of silence to commemorate the National Day of Mourning and honour the memory of workers killed or injured on the job.

I now invite hon. members to rise.

[A moment of silence observed]

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I hope I speak for everyone in this House when I salute your historic decision yesterday.

I would like to ask the Prime Minister if he will fully comply with your ruling yesterday, Mr. Speaker, and whether he will now work with us in good faith to do what we first proposed five months ago, which is to respect the authority of Parliament, deliver the documents and provide Canadians with the truth that they deserve.

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, you have made a ruling. At the same time, as you know and as I think was recognized, the fact is that the government has certain obligations that are established under statutes passed by this Parliament.

We obviously want to proceed in a way that will respect both of those things and, of course, we will be open to any reasonable suggestions to achieve those two objectives.

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, I still did not hear a clear answer to the question as to whether the government will comply with your ruling. My question is now about his understanding of that ruling.

Does the Prime Minister now understand that the ultimate decision to invoke national security to prevent the disclosure of documents rests with this House, with the elected representatives of the people, and not with the government?

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, we look forward to both complying with your ruling and with the legal obligations that have been established by statutes passed by this Parliament.

The fact is, the government cannot break the law, it cannot order public servants to break the law nor can it do anything that would unnecessarily jeopardize the safety of Canadian troops.

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Etobicoke—Lakeshore Ontario

Liberal

Michael Ignatieff LiberalLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, this side of the House respects the need to protect national security and the operational security of our troops.

Will the Prime Minister and his government work together with us and respect the will of the House and your ruling in order to protect the safety of our troops? Furthermore, will they tell Canadians the truth?

AfghanistanOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, you have made a ruling. In the meantime, the government has certain legal obligations that are established under statutes passed by this House. We want to proceed in a way that will respect both of those things, and of course we will be very open to any reasonable suggestions.

International CooperationOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Lise Zarac Liberal LaSalle—Émard, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the National Assembly unanimously supported our position to maintain the consensus that has existed for 25 years. However, the Prime Minister wants to cut funding to NGOs that support African women's right to choose, even if they have been raped. We know that systematic rape is used as a weapon of war in many African conflicts.

How can we claim to defend maternal health while taking away the right of African women who have been raped to control their bodies?