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House of Commons Hansard #37 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was conservative.

Topics

Snow Crab IndustryOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Liberal Cardigan, PE

Mr. Speaker, everybody involved in the snow crab industry in the southern gulf is fully aware that the government has totally mismanaged the snow crab fishery.

That being the case, could somebody in the government stand up in their place and indicate to the people involved in the snow crab fishery in the southern gulf what special programs would be put in place so that the plant workers can survive this devastating mismanagement?

Snow Crab IndustryOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, as I have said in the past, this certainly was not an easy decision.

I can assure the hon. member that we are doing everything we can and working with the province to ensure that those who are impacted by this decision receive some assistance through the province or through some other federal government programs.

Firearms RegistryOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Conservative

Kelly Block Conservative Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal leader has whipped his members into supporting the wasteful and ineffective long gun registry. We hope that those Liberals who voted for Bill C-391 will not deceive their constituents by changing their vote just to satisfy the Liberal leader. The choice is clear for all MPs, especially those who voted for the bill at second reading. We either vote to scrap or keep the long gun registry.

Could the Minister of Public Safety update the House on this important issue?

Firearms RegistryOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for all her work on this file.

Let me be clear. It is time to end the senseless prosecution of our hunters and outdoor enthusiasts once and for all. We hope that all Liberal MPs put the calls of their constituents above the latest order from the Liberal leader.

The Liberal leader is not fooling anyone with his unconstitutional proposals. We trust that the NDP will support this bill in its original form, instead of following the Liberal-led coalition of deceit.

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, it seems that the Conservatives have recreated the glory days of Brian Mulroney, unbridled patronage, rum bottle politics, and crooked lobbyists darkening the towels of the most senior offices on Parliament Hill. I know it sounds like Camelot to old school Conservatives, but it makes the rest of us sick.

Ordinary Canadians have to pack a lunch if they want to penetrate the red tape of the green fund, but somehow well-connected Conservatives, like Rahim Jaffer, have privileged access to top officials whenever they feel like it.

It is too late for damage control. Who is going to stand up and apologize for breaking the promise that was the Federal Accountability Act and breaking--

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Order. The hon. Minister of Transport.

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise and answer the question from my friend from Winnipeg Centre.

That question is a perfect example why the member for Winnipeg Centre was recently named by The Hill Times as the most quotable member of Parliament. I want to congratulate him on that.

However, let me be clear, we brought in the toughest lobbyist registration and lobbying reforms in Canadian history. Every Canadian is expected to obey the law and to follow the law.

We have an independent Commissioner of Lobbying who will conduct a review of this matter and make her own determinations as to the facts.

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, some say it is too bad the Federal Accountability Act was not written on softer paper because it could take its place in the outhouse next to the Eaton's catalogue.

In a blatant and textbook case of influence peddling, we know Rahim Jaffer promised his clients he could secure a green fund loan of $5 million at 2% interest, repayable only if the company turns a profit.

The jig is up for Jaffer and anybody else in the government who was aiding and abetting his deceitful ambition. It takes two to tango. Who in the government gave Jaffer the specific details about the green fund loans?

EthicsOral Questions

11:40 a.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the green fund, which I am privileged to oversee, has not given out any loans. What we are doing with the green fund is we are spending $100 million in Hamilton so it can stop dumping raw sewage into Lake Ontario. That is welcome.

We are building new hydroelectricity transmission lines in northwest British Columbia so we can get dirty diesel off the grid. That is also going to facilitate economic development for people who really need it.

We are also working in Yukon with the territorial government on a clean transmission line. Step by step we are really delivering for the environment and that is the whole purpose of the green fund.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

April 30th, 2010 / 11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Laforest Bloc Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, former minister Hélène Scherrer is another victim of the diplomatic conflict between Canada and Mexico with regard to visas. She and her husband were turned back at the border because the Mexican authorities require holders of Canadian diplomatic passports to present a visa. This measure was implemented after the Conservative government decided to require visas from Mexican nationals.

Rather than launching a diplomatic war that is harmful to tourism and trade, why does the Conservative government not stop requiring visas from Mexican nationals?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Thornhill Ontario

Conservative

Peter Kent ConservativeMinister of State of Foreign Affairs (Americas)

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for the question.

Mexico, as my colleague knows, is an important and strategic partner with Canada in North America, in the hemisphere and around the world.

The Government of Canada made the decision last year to impose visas to protect our refugee system and in October last year Mexico imposed a visa on those citizens travelling on diplomatic or official passports. Those holding diplomatic or official passports have a responsibility to stay informed about restrictions on their use abroad.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Bloc

Jean-Yves Laforest Bloc Saint-Maurice—Champlain, QC

Mr. Speaker, by requiring visas of Mexican nationals, the Conservative government is assuming they are all fraudsters. And, I might add, it is not afraid to compromise our privileged relationship with this economic partner.

Instead of blaming Mexicans for the backlog in the refugee claimant system, why does the government not establish a real refugee appeal division for all nationals, regardless of their country of origin?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

St. Catharines Ontario

Conservative

Rick Dykstra ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, the House is fully aware of the decisions that were made with respect to Mexico and Costa Rica regarding visas.

What I would like to ask the opposition is this. We have Bill C-11 that will go to committee next week to put in place some of the most aggressive refugee reforms we have seen in decades in the House.

I ask that member and I ask the opposition to support that bill at committee. Let us bring it back to the House of Commons, and let us have a vote and send it to the Senate before the summer recess.

Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Liberal Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, northern New Brunswick has been hit even harder by job losses in the manufacturing and forestry industries. The Conservative government used the money from the community adjustment fund for a variety of projects.

But only 12% of the money for that program was allocated to stimulus projects in northern New Brunswick. The Conservatives have always shown their disdain for the north.

Why are they penalizing the people of northern New Brunswick yet again? Why are we still paying the price today?

Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel ConservativeMinister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague, the minister responsible for this economic sector, said recently, our government has invested a lot of money in all regions in New Brunswick and the Atlantic provinces. The forestry industry has received more support than ever, and we will continue to support it.

These people do not seem to have any clue about the crises in the market. We will continue to show them the way.

Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude D'Amours Liberal Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Mr. Speaker, if he thinks that 12% of the money allocated is a lot of money for northern New Brunswick, he will soon get the message. That I can guarantee.

In northern New Brunswick, only three community projects and a single business project were approved by the Conservatives.

Instead, the so-called economic stimulus program helped develop a funding program for standard ACOA projects, in particular, some art gallery renovation projects.

How do the Conservatives expect to create long-term jobs in the north when only one business was able to benefit from the program?

When will we see long-term jobs in our regions?

Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, this is a very unusual question today when yesterday the Liberal leader was holding a round table and he basically took our policy and tried to present it as his own. He said that we need to work toward trade opportunities, we need to work toward new markets and we need to work toward developing new products. That is exactly what the government has done and that is exactly what we will do in the future, and the forestry industry will thrive once again.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington NDP Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, today the United States is facing an environmental disaster of epic proportions as the massive oil slick from the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil platform strikes land. These same oil companies want an exemption from having to drill relief wells for their operations in the Beaufort Sea.

With this clear evidence that the most stringent environmental protections must be applied to offshore drilling, will the government stand up to the oil companies, enforce drilling relief wells and come up with a real plan to deal with disasters in our Arctic waters?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, I am sure everyone in the House is saddened and worried by what is happening in the Gulf of Mexico and the possible ecological damage.

Canadians can take confidence from three facts. First, we have among the most robust offshore drilling policies anywhere in the world that applies in Canadian waters. Second, there are currently no authorizations for exploratory wells anywhere in the outer Beaufort Sea. Third, the National Energy Board is, in any event, reviewing its relief well policy and it obviously will be attentive to how this develops.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington NDP Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, the environment minister might also be interested to know that we have problems on the other side of the Arctic. Denmark has issued drilling permits in Davis Strait, right up against our maritime border in the Arctic. Davis Strait is also known as “iceberg alley”. All we have protecting us is a non-binding agreement on oil pollution.

What is the government doing to ensure Denmark is taking all the steps necessary to protect the environment in the strait, or are we going to wait until oil is washing up on the shores of Nunavut?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Jim Prentice ConservativeMinister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member goes too far. In light of what is happening in Louisiana and the concern the entire world has about the possibility of ecological damage, I think he should be somewhat measured in his comments.

The Government of Canada has an excellent relationship with the recently elected Home Rule Government in Greenland. In fact, the Canadian government has signed the very first agreement with that new government in Greenland, which was to protect the polar bears. We have an excellent relationship. We have discussed these very issues with that government and Canadians can be assured that the environment will be protected.

The EconomyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Patricia Davidson Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal leader keeps ignoring the economy. In fact, the only idea the Liberal leader has brought forward is to harm the economy by raising taxes on Canadians. From higher personal taxes to a hike in job-killing business taxes, he wants Canadians to pay more.

In contrast, our Conservative government's top priority remains growing the economy with Canada's economic action plan.

Would the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance please update the House on the latest news on the economy?

The EconomyOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Macleod Alberta

Conservative

Ted Menzies ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Sarnia—Lambton for her hard work on delivering Canada's economic action plan that obviously is working. It is working because Canada's economy will be proven to out-perform the G7 with the strongest growth for 2010-11. That is according to the IMF and the OECD. Since July 2009, some 180,000 new jobs have been created. That is good news. But there is better news today. February showed that our economy grew for the sixth straight month in a row.

EthicsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Liberal

Michelle Simson Liberal Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Ethics Commissioner has found that dozens of government cheques branded with the Conservative logo and handed over by numerous members and ministers went “too far in their self-serving partisanship”.

Will the Conservatives apologize to Canadians for this misleading and deceitful partisan practice?

EthicsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

North Vancouver B.C.

Conservative

Andrew Saxton ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, I would remind the member that the Ethics Commissioner said that Liberal government publications and communications have in the past emphasized red and white. We all remember how the Liberal Party used the Canadian flag as its own partisan logo back in the days of the sponsorship scandal.

The Ethics Commissioner said that there was no violation of any code or any act. We accept her recommendations and are acting on them.