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House of Commons Hansard #56 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was post.

Topics

Jobs and Economic Growth ActGovernment Orders

10:55 a.m.

Conservative

Dean Del Mastro Conservative Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, in fact, these are specifically economic measures. When I talk to leaders in my community and people in the provincial government, they say that in the current system there are overlapping regulations and it requires environmental studies to be completed when studies have already been completed, often by the exact same firms. This is stifling Canada's economy.

We will not abrogate any responsibilities with respect to the environment at all. I am proud of the regulations that protect Canada's environment. We have the most stringent rules in the world when it comes to offshore drilling and the hon. member should know that. Perhaps he should speak to his own provincial government and municipalities about why they so strongly support the government in this regard and what we are trying to do.

This is about creating a stronger economy, more jobs, more growth and more hope. That is why this budget bill has been constructed in the way it has been.

Jobs and Economic Growth ActGovernment Orders

11 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

As hon. members will know, it is now 11:00, so we will have to proceed with statements by members. However, there are three minutes remaining in the time allotted for questions and comment by the hon. parliamentary secretary, which we can take up when the debate on the matter is resumed.

Canadian Forces DayStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Greg Kerr Conservative West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, on June 6, Canadians will commemorate the 66th anniversary of D-Day, the allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France that led to the end of the second world war.

Sixty-six years ago, on the beaches of Normandy, more than 15,000 Canadians and Newfoundlanders came together to reopen the door to freedom and democracy in France. By the time the sun had set that day, Canadian troops had progressed further than any other allied nation. History was made on D-Day, and so too were heroes. These remarkable Canadians knew their duty, and they did it well. Now it is our duty to remember, honour, and thank those who served.

It is fitting that the first Sunday in June has been declared Canadian Forces Day. The values our veterans fought for on the beaches of Normandy are the same ones our military men and women continue to defend today. I ask that we offer our thanks to today's brave servicemen and servicewomen as we remember the contributions of those who landed on the beaches 66 years ago.

On June 6, Canada remembers D-Day.

Lahore Mosque AttacksStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro Liberal York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, last month, many Canadians and people around the world were horrified to learn of a terrible hate crime committed in Lahore, Pakistan. An unprovoked attack was committed by gunmen who invaded two mosques filled with Ahmadi Muslims offering Friday prayers. After the horror in the mosques unfolded, the attackers followed the injured into the Jinnah hospital seeking to finish their horrific killing campaign.

To those of us who have had the pleasure of knowing many within the Canadian Ahmadi community, these events seem especially tragic. The Canadian Ahmadi Muslim community comprises a group of devout, peaceful, family-oriented people, and when I think of this tragedy in human terms, I am saddened beyond words.

Like all Canadians, I am truly troubled by these events and extend my personal prayers to the Canadian Ahmadi community and to the families of those touched by the unspeakable events in Lahore.

Association francophone pour le savoirStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Bloc

Monique Guay Bloc Rivière-du-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, Acfas, the Association francophone pour le savoir, held its 78th conference in Montreal from May 10 to 14. The theme of this year's conference was “Découvrir aujourd'hui ce que sera demain”, or discovering the future today. More than 6,000 francophone scientists, including 550 foreign researchers from 30 countries, had the opportunity to discuss and share their knowledge, in French. The conference was a great success thanks in part to the excellent work of the volunteers. It was considered one of the largest multidisciplinary gatherings of learning and research in the Francophonie.

This annual meeting brings together scientists from the fields of health and life sciences, physics, mathematics and engineering, the arts and humanities, and education. Acfas is a not for profit organization.

The next conference will be held for the first time at two universities, Université de Sherbrooke and Bishop's University.

As the critic for the Francophonie, I am proud to announce that the sciences are alive and well in French.

Lloyd HartleyStatements By Members

June 4th, 2010 / 11 a.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault NDP Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a truly Canadian hero from my great riding of Sudbury, who passed away this past weekend.

Lloyd Hartley signed up to fight for our country in the second world war at the age of 16. He was a number one soldier, as the many medals he proudly wore demonstrate. Mr. Hartley was wounded in action three times and was given many roles of the utmost responsibility by his superiors.

Mr. Hartley was well known for his passion in his presentation of In Flanders Fields at Remembrance Day ceremonies. He was also a very active member of the War Pensioners of Canada and of the Royal Canadian Legion in Sudbury. Mr. Hartley and his colleagues met with me many times to talk about the importance of ensuring that our veterans, who served our country with honour, receive the benefits they so rightly deserve.

To his family and friends, our condolences. Let me articulate something I heard Mr. Hartley say often. “At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them”.

We will remember Mr. Hartley. May he rest in peace.

Foreign AffairsStatements By Members

11 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Nepean—Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, some people living in the comfort and safety of western democracies find it easy to criticize those who must fight terror on the front lines on a daily basis. Maybe these critics would feel differently if they had to live next door to Hamas.

Terrorists in Hamas-ruled Gaza rained over 3,000 rockets and mortar bombs into Israeli communities in 2008. They target civilians and seek maximum loss of life. That is why the Jewish state blocks arms from entering the Hamas-controlled territory. Yet U.S. Vice-President Biden pointed out this week that Israel allows humanitarian goods to pass directly into Gaza.

Our government stands in solidarity with the one and a half million people of Gaza who suffer under the terror of Hamas.

We were also proud to host Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu this week.

Though we are blessed to live in the safety and comfort of Canadian life, we will always stand with those who confront terror every day.

Order of Merit of the Police ForcesStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Liberal Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to rise to congratulate two eminent community members in my riding of Newton—North Delta. Both Chief Constable Jim Cessford of the Delta Police and Chief Superintendent Fraser MacRae of the Surrey RCMP recently received the prestigious Governor General's Order of Merit of the Police Forces.

All residents of Surrey and Delta have benefited from their years of service and successful strategies to reduce crime rates in Surrey and Delta. I ask all my colleagues to join me in congratulating Chief Cessford and Chief MacRae on this great honour.

National UnityStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Colin Mayes Conservative Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canada did not invent human rights. Human rights invented Canada.

People from nations all over this globe have come to Canada to escape oppression and religious discrimination and to enjoy the opportunity of free enterprise Canada provides. Truly, the three founding nations of Canada, the aboriginals, the francophones, and the anglophones, should be recognized as the nations that have placed the foundation stones for our freedoms and rights.

The Bloc wants to separate us as a nation, but the citizens of our nation are one in our patriotic love for liberty, freedom, the rule of law, and democracy. These principles are the mortar that unites us as one in the Canadian mosaic. One language or culture should not trump the other in our free society.

May we continue to serve all Canadians in this House with respect and gratefulness. I wish to thank past parliamentarians who drafted our rights and freedoms that we enjoy today and especially our men and women who defend them.

Canada PostStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Bloc

Guy André Bloc Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, with the Liberals as their accomplices, the Conservatives are threatening the viability of the postal service by including a thousand and one reforms in Bill C-9, the budget implementation bill.

Among other things, Bill C-9 contains a deregulation project to put an end to Canada Post's monopoly on international remailing.

The Conservative government is trying to fool the public by slipping this deregulation plan into an 800-page omnibus budget implementation bill. They are trying to privatize this corporation on the sly, without the public even realizing it.

The government is opening the door to the complete deregulation of Canada Post. The citizens of Berthier—Maskinongé and all of Quebec are opposed to this process.

I implore the Liberal members not to support this Conservative bill. They must all rise and vote against Bill C-9 to maintain universal, accessible postal service.

Firearms RegistryStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Brian Jean Conservative Fort McMurray—Athabasca, AB

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in a shocking display of political gamesmanship, the NDP joined forces with the Liberals and the Bloc Québécois to pass a motion to keep the long gun registry as is.

In November 2009, 12 NDP and eight Liberal MPs listened to their constituents and voted in favour of Bill C-391 to scrap the wasteful and ineffective long gun registry. Now they are trying whatever they can do to derail it.

The Liberal member for Malpeque voted to scrap the long gun registry in November. Will he now vote to keep it? Will he allow his vote to be whipped by the Liberal leader, or will he listen to the voices of his constituents instead?

Those 20 opposition MPs who did the right thing at second reading and voted to scrap the long gun registry will have to explain to their constituents why they allowed their party bosses to whip their vote and silence their voices.

When it comes to the long gun registry, MPs can either vote to keep it or vote to scrap it. It is that simple.

Aristides de Sousa MendesStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Liberal Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, there are moments in the life of a Parliament when colleagues from all parties come together in common cause: to remember and to be reminded, to inspire and be inspired.

Such a moment occurred this week, when MPs commemorated the 125th anniversary of the birth of Portuguese diplomat Aristides de Sousa Mendes, and the 40th anniversary of his saving 30,000 people—12,000 of them Jews—with his visas for life in 1940, reminding us of the Talmudic/Koranic adage that whoever saves a single life, it is as if he or she has saved an entire universe.

This singular heroism of de Sousa Mendes, whose namesake grandson, Louis Philippe Mendes, is a resident of my constituency of Mount Royal, ennobles us all. He never received the honour he deserved in his life. May his memory serve as a blessing for us all.

The EconomyStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, this morning, Statistics Canada reported that 24,700 new jobs were created in May, the fifth consecutive monthly increase. Continued job creation is more proof that Canada's economic action plan is working.

Since last July, Canada has created nearly 310,000 new jobs. Statistics Canada announced this week that the Canadian economy grew 6.1% in the first quarter of 2010, the highest quarterly growth rate in a decade.

Canada's economy is on the right track, but the global recovery remains fragile. That is why we must fully implement Canada's economic action plan.

While the opposition has plans to raise taxes and stall the recovery, our government is working hard to make our country a leader in jobs and growth.

Create Your Canada ContestStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Pat Martin NDP Winnipeg Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize and pay tribute to Sam Unrau, the 2010 winner of the Create your Canada contest. This contest invited Winnipeg high school students to suggest their ideas for a private member's bill to make Canada a better place.

On Wednesday, Sam came to Ottawa to witness his Bill C-523 being introduced and given first reading in the House of Commons. Mr. Unrau, who uses a wheelchair for mobility, won the contest for his proposal that Canada conduct an accessibility audit of all federally regulated modes of transportation. Sam's thoughtful proposal seeks to create an environment in which people of all levels of physical ability can travel with dignity.

Our thanks go to Pauline Clarke, the Chief Superintendent of the Winnipeg School Division; Mr. Scott Gair, of Encore Music, for his generosity in providing airfare; Mr. Dave Taylor, Sam's excellent teacher at Argyle School; and all the students in Winnipeg who participated in the contest.

It was Sam's first trip to Ottawa, but I predict that Ottawa has not seen the last of this fine young man.

Ministerial ResponsibilityStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Colin Carrie Conservative Oshawa, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canada has a tradition of ministerial responsibility. That means that cabinet ministers are responsible for what happens in their names and to Parliament.

Canadians expect the people in charge to account for their staff, and this situation is no different.

The tradition of ministerial accountability is as old as Canada itself. That is why Conservative cabinet ministers answer questions in question period, and that is why they appear before committees to answer for their offices.

The Liberal leader wants to do away with this tradition. Instead, he wants to import the foreign U.S. committee system that is used as a political weapon to bully, intimidate, and humiliate opponents, which is something we will not allow.

We hope that all opposition committee chairs will follow the rules and procedures rather than conduct kangaroo courts, as they have been doing.

Employment InsuranceStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Bloc

Robert Carrier Bloc Alfred-Pellan, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' penchant for stealing money from workers is outrageous. Among the plethora of bills that it would amend, budget Bill C-9 would wipe out the $57 billion that the Conservative government owes to the employment insurance fund. It used that $57 billion to pay down the deficit caused by its own poor management of public funds.

In addition, this government will increase employment insurance benefits by 15¢ in January 2011. That money will not go to improve the current system but to reimburse what the Conservatives have pillaged from the employment insurance fund.

The Conservatives are making the unemployed pay for their deficit. They are taking advantage of the fact that this omnibus bill, Bill C-9, is a confidence vote, and they have filled it with all sorts of reforms and measures. They know that the Liberals will never dare oppose it and trigger an election.

But we in the Bloc Québécois will side with workers and oppose Bill C-9.

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and EthicsStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Bonnie Crombie Liberal Mississauga—Streetsville, ON

Mr. Speaker, the mystery of the missing PMO communications director continues. Dimitri Soudas, the 30-year-old spokesman for the unaccountable Conservative Prime Minister, has been evading a House of Commons bailiff all week long in an elaborate cat-and-mouse game, all so he can avoid being accountable to Canadians by answering questions before the Commons ethics committee.

Mr. Soudas has so flouted the law on parliamentary privilege that he has even barred the bailiff from the Prime Minister's office in Langevin Block. Clearly, Mr. Soudas needs to educate himself about the laws of this land. Parliament is the highest court in the country, and dodging a summons to appear before a parliamentary committee is in contempt of the law.

He also has no right to prevent a licensed bailiff from a parliamentary building, a bailiff who is only carrying out the duty he was assigned.

Mr. Soudas's boss, the Prime Minister, needs to instruct his employee to stop playing games, to stop thumbing his nose at the law, and to avail himself to the bailiff. He can run, but he cannot hide, and he can no longer be saved by the fire alarm. It is time--

Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and EthicsStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for South Shore—St. Margaret's.

The EconomyStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Gerald Keddy Conservative South Shore—St. Margaret's, NS

Mr. Speaker, Statistics Canada reported this morning that 24,700 new jobs were created in May, the fifth straight month of job gains.

Canada's continued job creation is further proof that Canada's economic action plan is working. May represents the eighth month of job gains in the past 10 months. In fact, since July of last year, Canada has created nearly 310,000 new jobs.

With numbers like this, it is not surprising that the influential magazine, The Economist, recently called Canada “an economic star”. It is encouraging to see Canada's economy on the right track, thanks to our government's actions.

Nonetheless the global recovery remains fragile. That is why we need to fully implement Canada's economic action plan. I encourage all members in this chamber to support Canada's economic action plan.

G8 and G20 SummitsOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady Liberal St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are rightfully angry about the skyrocketing costs of the G8 and G20 summits.

When the Conservatives first chose the industry minister's riding for the summit site, they knew full well that holding it there was a physical impossibility. Now they have had to bail out Toronto at huge expense to taxpayers. It is a billion-dollar boondoggle.

How do the Conservatives justify their obvious gross mismanagement?

G8 and G20 SummitsOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Oxford Ontario

Conservative

Dave MacKenzie ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite might be surprised to know that her leader, when he was in Huntsville not very long ago, said:

We want to make it very clear...when we are the government of Canada, the next G8 Summit will be held at Deerhurst Resort in Huntsville....

You heard it from me: the G8 Summit will be in this community when we form the next government.

That was from the leader of the official opposition.

G8 and G20 SummitsOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady Liberal St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, it is amazing that, once we put in infrastructure, the Conservatives think that is a bad thing.

It is not just security costs that are out of control: $1.1 million for a sidewalk that is 84 kilometres from the summit site; and $400,000 to restore a vintage steamboat that will not be in the water until two weeks after the G8.

Why does the industry minister not understand? Canadians deserve better than having their money spent to buy his re-election.

G8 and G20 SummitsOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has her facts wrong. There is no funding from G8 funds for the steamship, unlike her allegation, but I will tell the House who did spend some money on some ships.

In 1995, for the G7 Halifax summit, then finance minister Paul Martin spent $300,000 on the Bluenose.

The Liberals spent money for infrastructure, gateway signage, marketing campaigns and a new community centre for Halifax. That is how they spent money for the G7 summit in 1995. They are speaking from both sides of their mouth.

G8 and G20 SummitsOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Siobhan Coady Liberal St. John's South—Mount Pearl, NL

Mr. Speaker, the only one speaking out of both sides of his mouth is indeed that minister.

It is not just steamboats, gazebos and sidewalks to nowhere. How about $270,000 from the G8 fund to buy a bandshell and new washrooms? The only problem is that those washrooms are located 20 kilometres away from the summit site. That is a long way to go when one has to go.

Given the Prime Minister's history of missing G8 photo ops, would the minister not agree that putting the new G8 washrooms 20 kilometres away from the summit site is poor planning indeed?

G8 and G20 SummitsOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, it is well known that there are economic and tourism benefits for the whole region that are spent for as part of legacy funding. That is why the Liberals spent the money in Halifax.

One of the other things the Liberals did in Halifax, after the 1995 G7 summit was over, was spend another $3 million on projects in Halifax just to thank the people of that city. Yet here they are criticizing the G8 and the G20.