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House of Commons Hansard #120 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was regard.

Topics

United Arab EmiratesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I think that basically everyone would like the opposition to take Canada's future and interests to heart. On this side of the House, we refuse to sign agreements that are not good for Canada and that are not in our country's best interests.

I want to make it clear that I wish that, instead of focusing on internationalism, they would support Canada's efforts on this issue.

SportsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault NDP Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, yesterday was the NHL All-Star Game and, unfortunately, because of lingering effects of post-concussion syndrome, Sidney Crosby did not play, but “Sid the Kid” is not the only one sitting out these days. Across the country countless young athletes are needlessly suffering the same plight.

We have a concussion epidemic in this country, yet Conservatives cut federal funding for sports injury prevention research by 40%. When will the government restore this funding and take action to protect our young athletes?

SportsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn ConservativeMinister of State (Sport)

Mr. Speaker, let me begin by saying nobody likes to see overly aggressive hitting or fighting in any sport at any level.

Right now, amateur sport in Canada is receiving its highest level of funding in history. We are proud to support our athletes. We will continue to support Hockey Canada and its efforts to make sure that it continues to address this, as it is doing now.

Everybody in amateur hockey in Canada wears a helmet and that is the way it should be.

SportsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Glenn Thibeault NDP Sudbury, ON

Mr. Speaker, this is more of an issue than just wearing helmets. Everyone knows concussions are a serious problem and it is time for Canadian leadership.

Just this morning the U.S. Congress introduced a bill to protect athletes from concussions and serious sports injuries. Members of the Canadian athletic and medical community have repeatedly called on the government to help develop a strategy to better protect our young athletes.

Why is the government lagging behind the U.S. when it comes to reducing serious injuries and how many kids must be sidelined before we see some action?

SportsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Saanich—Gulf Islands B.C.

Conservative

Gary Lunn ConservativeMinister of State (Sport)

Mr. Speaker, funding to amateur sport in Canada is happening at an unprecedented level, the highest in the history of this country, something that our government is very proud of. We will continue to support those organizations to continue to do their work, as we have done, but we are not going to start regulating the wearing of helmets in sports. We are going to leave that up to national sport organizations like Hockey Canada which, quite frankly, do a very good job.

Forestry IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Steven Blaney Conservative Lévis—Bellechasse, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative members from Quebec recognize how vital the forestry industry is to the economy in our regions. Unlike the Bloc members, who vote against the economic action plan and its billions of dollars, our Conservative government is taking action and is delivering the goods for Quebec.

Could my colleague, the Minister of State for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, bring us up to speed on our government's strategy to support the forestry industry and the economy in our regions?

Forestry IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel ConservativeMinister of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his question.

With the softwood lumber agreement alone, this government managed to bring $5 billion back into the country. A measure that we introduced, the pulp and paper green transformation program, is generating positive results for Quebec, to the tune of $265 million in the regions of Quebec. Jobs are being saved and families are earning a living. Those are positive results.

Last week, the Forest Products Association of Canada declared, “The investments from the program...serve as an excellent example of smart policy and smart spending. It demonstrates a strong understanding of the transformation now taking place in Canada’s...industry.”

Forestry IndustryOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The hon. member for Winnipeg South Centre.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Liberal Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' decision to cancel funding for successful anti-gang programs in Winnipeg is going to drive at-risk youth back into the streets. These anti-gang programs are low cost and highly effective and were announced with great fanfare by two Conservative ministers in 2007. Today, however, Manitoba Conservative MPs refuse to explain the cuts.

I ask the Minister of Public Safety, how do bigger prisons and cuts to crime prevention make the streets of Winnipeg safer?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, that particular member likes to talk about crime prevention measures but when it really counts she has consistently voted against such initiatives.

It is our Conservative government that created the national crime prevention strategy and the youth gang prevention fund. Our funding in that respect has been unequalled and certainly not matched by the Liberal governments.

I wish the member would stop her double-talk and actually support measures that keep dangerous criminals behind bars and give young people a chance to get out of gangs.

Quebec City ArenaOral Questions

3 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Guimond Bloc Montmorency—Charlevoix—Haute-Côte-Nord, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Quebec has committed to financing up to 45% of a multi-purpose arena in Quebec City, up to a maximum of $175 million. Of course, the governments' share would decrease based on contributions from the private sector.

Now that the private sector has committed, as the Conservatives demanded, will the federal government commit to matching the Government of Quebec's funding? That is all that is missing.

Quebec City ArenaOral Questions

3 p.m.

Louis-Saint-Laurent Québec

Conservative

Josée Verner ConservativeMinister of Intergovernmental Affairs

Mr. Speaker, someone needs to settle this matter, and it is obviously not going to be the Bloc members. Premier Charest also said that he does not need the Bloc to settle matters in Quebec. That said, our position has not changed for months now: we want to see a significant contribution from the private sector. The mayor is working to set up funding that must include the private sector. At this time, we have not received an official request or a clear proposal on this topic.

IndustryOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton NDP Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, in Hamilton on Saturday, 10,000 people marched in solidarity with the 900 locked out workers and 9,000 retirees of U.S. Steel who are together at the forefront of fighting for decent jobs and pensions. They get it.

Without family-sustaining jobs there is no economic recovery. Without pension protection, seniors are being robbed of the retirements they have earned.

When will the government get it? When will it develop an industrial strategy that supports decent jobs? When will it take real action to make pensions a priority?

IndustryOral Questions

3 p.m.

Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont Alberta

Conservative

Mike Lake ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, as U.S. Steel is in breach of its production and employment undertakings, this government continues to pursue a court action against the company.

What we have talked about is studying this at the industry committee. We look forward to studying the Investment Canada Act. We look forward to working with our colleagues from all parties to find a solution.

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Tilly O'Neill-Gordon Conservative Miramichi, NB

Mr. Speaker, our government is focused on working for Canadians. We have a number of initiatives that will get criminals off the streets and make Canadian communities safer, including Bill C-23B, eliminating pardons and Bill C-39, ending early release. Canadians would like us to pass these important bills as soon as possible.

Could the Minister of Public Safety update the House on the status of these bills?

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, last session the Liberal-led coalition held up four important bills at the public safety committee that would make our streets and communities safer.

Today I call upon the opposition members to begin doing the work that Canadians expect them to do and return these bills back to the House for third reading and passage. Victims have waited long enough for these important measures to be passed.

Government Response to PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8)(b) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 138 petitions.

Access to Information, Privacy and EthicsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

January 31st, 2011 / 3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Shawn Murphy Liberal Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 11th report of the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics, in relation to a study of the privacy implications of a street-level imaging applications.

Maple Leaf and Tulip Day ActRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer NDP Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-613, An Act respecting the friendship between Canada and the Netherlands.

Mr. Speaker, if it were not for the efforts of Canadian military personnel and the Government of Canada in the 1930s and 1940s, Holland would not be a nation today. In fact, the people of the Netherlands are ever so grateful for the liberation of their country by Canada and her allies.

As a Dutch-born parliamentarian, it gives me great pleasure to introduce in the House legislation to recognize the actual liberation day of the Netherlands. From this day forward, May 5 shall be known as Maple Leaf and Tulip Day to honour and recognize the tremendous friendship between the Netherlands and Canada.

As we are aware, the Netherlands sends many tulips to Canada every year in recognition of that. There is no prouder leaf or flower out there than the maple leaf and the tulip. I encourage theheritage minister and all parliamentarians to pass this legislation as soon as possible.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Division BellsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Carleton—Mississippi Mills Ontario

Conservative

Gordon O'Connor ConservativeMinister of State and Chief Government Whip

Mr. Speaker, there have been consultations between all parties and I believe you will find unanimous support for the following motion. I move:

That, notwithstanding the provisions of any Standing Order, for the present session, when a recorded division is to be held on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday, except recorded divisions deferred to the conclusion of oral questions, the bells to call in the Members shall be sounded for not more than thirty minutes.

Division BellsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

Does the hon. chief government whip have the unanimous consent of the House to propose this motion?

Division BellsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Division BellsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Division BellsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Division BellsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Peter Milliken

(Motion agreed to)