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House of Commons Hansard #53 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was artists.

Topics

Copyright Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach NDP Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member opposite. Yes, we are new, but we have experience and we interact with artists. I am a teacher and I have used material created by artists. I know how important it is, in terms of economic balance, for creation to continue and for the work of the artists to be recognized for what it is worth. They have to be given more funding, not less funding, with a larger share going to corporations, as the bill currently provides.

It is complex and a number of people are feeling trampled on because of this bill. There is something not quite right. Consultations were indeed held on the matter of the digital locks, but the technology has advanced quite a bit since then. Like the Internet, technology has become more digitized in the past few years. There are more and more new technologies. The proposals also have to be new and take into account these new developments.

Copyright Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Jinny Sims NDP Newton—North Delta, BC

Mr. Speaker, there are a number of items that this Parliament and previous Parliaments have dealt with. One that comes to my mind is an end to child poverty. We debated that in this country for a long time, but I do not see a bill before us to say we are going to take action on it right now.

Even though some of the concepts in this bill might have been discussed earlier, this is a new bill before a new Parliament. Therefore, how does my colleague see the impact of the bill not only on artists, but also on students?

Copyright Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach NDP Beauharnois—Salaberry, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for raising this very important point for students. They are getting an education and do not yet have steady, well-paid employment. It is outrageous to have digital locks on the work they access digitally and for them to have to pay to continue benefiting from that material after 30 days. They do not have the means to keep paying for 30 more days. They need affordable, permanent access to the material because their schooling lasts more than 30 days. We have to balance all these complex aspects with respect for the work of the artist, who should be paid fairly.

Copyright Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Conservative Barry Devolin

Resuming debate. We have about three minutes left in government orders.

The hon. member for Timmins—James Bay.

Copyright Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to rise in the House as the digital affairs critic for the New Democratic Party on the issue of copyright.

I have been involved in the issue of copyright in this House for seven years and I have seen somewhat of a transformation in terms of the understanding of Parliament when it comes to copyright. Unfortunately, with the bill, we still see that on key elements the government does not get it.

If we go back to 2004, the idea of a digital culture that was being told to us by the lobbyists was that of a great cultural tsunami that would wipe out everything that was special about Canadian culture. They tried to constrain the digital environment as it somehow was a threat. However, we saw it in the New Democratic Party as probably the greatest platform for the distribution of ideas and culture since Gutenberg got his Bible.

I want to be fair to all parties. We have moved down the road in terms of understanding that the digital culture is not, as the recording industry used to say, the toothpaste they were going to put back in the tube or the genie to be put back in the bottle. We were going to have to find a way to adapt, as we have done time and time again with copyright. However, what is missing in the bill are two key elements that make copyright work.

One element is the understanding of remuneration of artists. We have to be able to monetize how artists' materials are being transmitted. That is the fundamental principle of copyright, yet we see within the bill time and again the traditional royalty payments to artists being erased. That is not a balance. That is creating an incredible disequilibrium in the artistic and creative community.

The other element is access, the ability of people to access works. The Conservatives' position is to put a digital lock on products and let the market decide. That would create a two-tier set of rights where Parliament would establish which rights citizens can have. For example, a blind student could access work in an analog format, but if there were a digital lock on it, that right would disappear. In a parliamentary system, we cannot create a two-tier set of rights. The digital locks cannot override the rights of Canadians.

The obsession of the Conservatives that digital locks would somehow create a better market does not stand up to the test. Our WIPO competitors around the world have adopted standards on digital locks. Under the WIPO treaty, specifically in articles 10 and 11, countries are given the right to establish digital locks to protect property from being stolen, but the exceptions that are created in a parliamentary system are a citizen's right.

Most of our competitors have adopted that model. The Conservative government is actually going backwards and would put artists and consumers in a worse position.

Copyright Modernization ActGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Conservative Barry Devolin

Order, please. I must interrupt the hon. member for Timmins—James Bay. He will have seven minutes remaining when this matter returns before the House.

CIAX FMStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Bloc Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to highlight the 10th anniversary of the creation of CIAX 98.3 FM, a community radio station that plays an essential role in the community of Windsor and the Val-Saint-François region. Ten years ago, a group of friends, Julie Lupien, Jean-François Fredette, Gaétan Graveline and Patrick Lévesque, created this community radio station in order to enable young people to go back to work or back to school. With support from the community, they rolled up their sleeves and created a service that the community can no longer live without.

Over the years, volunteers of all ages have helped create various types of programming that meet the needs of the cultural, community, political, sports, education and business sectors, just to name a few. I congratulate the volunteers and creators of this radio station for their commitment to maintaining this communication tool, which is much appreciated by the listeners. Long live CIAX FM.

R.B. BennettStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

John Williamson Conservative New Brunswick Southwest, NB

Mr. Speaker, some prime ministers have provided the leadership that makes our country great. One such leader was the Right Hon. Richard Bedford Bennett, a son of New Brunswick and a westerner by adoption.

R.B. Bennett was prime minister from 1930 to 1935 and was elected after campaigning to fight the Great Depression.

Upon winning office, he allocated aid to the unemployed and continued this with the Relief Act of 1932. He addressed the country on radio, promoting minimum wage, unemployment insurance, health care and the regulation of banks, all early examples of modern public policy.

Prime Minister Bennett created the Bank of Canada, the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission, later the CBC, and the Canadian Wheat Board, although membership then was voluntary.

Importantly, he signed the Statute of Westminster, making Canada fully independent and equal in status to Great Britain.

It is time that recognition be given to Prime Minister R.B. Bennett who achieved so much despite enormous obstacles.

I fully support the effort to have a statue erected on Parliament Hill to commemorate his contribution to Canada and call upon our government to join this bipartisan campaign. The time for a statue of R.B. Bennett is now.

Pathfinder Youth Centre SocietyStatements by Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Jasbir Sandhu NDP Surrey North, BC

Mr. Speaker, youth gang prevention programs are critical for the future of our children and the safety of our communities.

The Pathfinder Youth Centre Society is an important organization in my community that helps at-risk youth by teaching them conflict resolution, personal responsibility and job skills while helping to build their self-esteem and confidence.

Cost-effective crime prevention programs like Pathfinders help our youth stay out of gangs and in school.

Unfortunately, I recently learned that the Conservative government will soon be cutting most of Pathfinders' federal funding.

The Conservatives' out of touch approach to crime ignores crime prevention and the safety of our communities. I urge them to restore funding to Pathfinders and support organizations like it across the country.

Humber CollegeStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Trottier Conservative Etobicoke—Lakeshore, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to celebrate the official opening of Humber College's newest building, the Lakeshore Commons, at the college's Lakeshore campus.

The Lakeshore Commons is the new hub for student interaction and learning. As the new campus centrepiece, surrounded by an academic village of nine historic buildings, this facility is fully electronic, built to LEED Silver standards and features the centre for digital and media communications.

The Lakeshore Commons will serve students in the schools of community and social services, liberal arts and sciences, media studies and information technology, and the business school.

The Lakeshore Commons received a Government of Canada investment through the knowledge infrastructure program. The Lakeshore Commons was built in less than two years and generated more than 600 jobs during construction and post-construction.

In Ontario, the Government of Canada is investing $800 million in 56 knowledge infrastructure projects. Our government has invested in innovation and knowledge infrastructure to set the foundation for economic prosperity.

The program is creating jobs and generating the advanced technological infrastructure needed to keep Canadian institutions at the forefront of scientific advancement and to ensure economic growth into the future.

IranStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Irwin Cotler Liberal Mount Royal, QC

Mr. Speaker, the presence in Canada of Mr. Mahmoud Reza Khavari, who has exercised a leadership role in Iranian banks that have been sanctioned by the United States, the European Union and the United Nations for their financing of Iran's nuclear weaponization program and terrorist activities, is most disturbing.

In particular, Mr. Khavari would have had knowledge of, if not influence over, transactions of such state sanctioned banks, including those with the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, which emerged as the epicentre of the Iranian nuclear, terrorist and domestic repressive regime.

Canadians are troubled, and rightly so, by the ties between Mr. Khavari and these dangerous elements of the Iranian regime. The government must take action to determine the exact ties between Mr. Khavari and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as well as the specific nature of his business with the Iranian regime and take the appropriate measures once the results of the investigation are known.

Shipbuilding IndustryStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Wai Young Conservative Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the immense contribution that our government recently made to the future of my city, province and country. After a fair, transparent and competitive process, the shipbuilding secretariat announced an $8 billion contract to Vancouver's Seaspan Marine Corporation. This announcement was met with jubilation across British Columbia. I applaud our government for its success in implementing a fair and transparent arm's length process.

As we have heard, this decision has been great news for Canadians, British Columbians and Vancouverites. By some estimates, our national shipbuilding procurement strategy will create 15,000 good jobs over the next 30 years, revitalizing our Canadian shipbuilding industry.

While the parties in opposition have no plan for growing our economy and creating jobs, our government supports job growth, delivering on our promise to create good jobs in high tech industries across Canada, and to provide much needed ships for the Canadian Navy and Coast Guard.

I join the people of Vancouver South in congratulating Vancouver's Seaspan Marine Corporation for its most successful bid.

Affordable HousingStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Rathika Sitsabaiesan NDP Scarborough—Rouge River, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week we marked National Housing Day. Safe and affordable housing is a major issue in my constituency and, sadly, is something that far too many Canadians go without.

In recent months, municipal authorities in Toronto have taken the steps to sell up to 2,356 public housing units in my constituency alone to address budget shortfalls, displacing 2,356 families in my community. Further, many of the residents in these units that are up for immediate sale were not even informed that they were going to be sold.

Safe and affordable public housing in communities like mine and the people who occupy these units have been neglected and pushed aside to prioritize budgetary concerns and deficit problems. Budgets are being balanced on the backs of the poor and vulnerable.

Today I call upon the government to take action to make safe and affordable housing a reality for all Canadians. I call upon my colleagues from all sides of the House to support the establishment of a national housing strategy.

Let us ensure that no—

Affordable HousingStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Acting Speaker Conservative Barry Devolin

The hon. member for Langley.

UkraineStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Warawa Conservative Langley, BC

Mr. Speaker, in 2008 Canada's Parliament unanimously passed a bill to recognize the Ukrainian famine of 1932-33 as an act of genocide. The horrific truth is that millions of Ukrainians were starved and murdered by Stalin's communist regime. That genocide is known as Holodomor.

Last year I was honoured to stand with our Prime Minister, the member for Selkirk—Interlake, and Senator Andreychuk at the national Holodomor memorial in Kiev during Canada's official visit to Ukraine. The Prime Minister placed a symbolic jar of grain at the memorial and stood with Ukrainians to remember Holodomor.

The Government of Canada is committed to remembering the victims of Holodomor and to increasing international awareness of genocide and the dignity of life in Canada and around the world. May atrocities like Holodomor never happen again.

Vechnaya Pamyat, in eternal memory, to Ukrainians who perished in Holodomor.

Ski Tourism IndustryStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Wild Rose, AB

Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure today as chair of the parliamentary tourism caucus to congratulate Senator Nancy Greene Raine and her husband, Al Raine, on the lifetime achievement award they will receive tonight at the TIAC Canadian tourism awards.

Senator Greene Raine and Mr. Raine are two of the true pioneers of Canada's ski tourism industry. They were instrumental in the early development of Whistler Blackcomb and Sun Peaks Resorts in British Columbia. The senator is, of course, also an Olympic ski racing champion, who continues to hold the Canadian record for the most World Cup victories. She is an Officer of the Order of Canada and was named Canada's female athlete of the century in 1999.

Together, this couple's contribution to the development of B.C.'s ski industry and its integration with the broader tourism sector has helped create an unparalleled experience for visitors and tens of thousands of jobs for Canadians.

I applaud their contributions to our tourism industry.

YemenStatements by Members

November 24th, 2011 / 2:10 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate the people of Yemen, whose peaceful revolution has resulted in a deal that will see President Saleh finally step down after nine months of protests.

The struggle for peace in Yemen is not over. The president's family members ares still in key positions in the government and the military, and Saleh himself has been granted immunity. The regime still stands, yet an important first step has been taken. We call on all parties to respect the agreement.

On Tuesday I met with members of Yemen's opposition who noted that Yemen is entering a new political chapter, and they will need the help of Canada. Canada must now work to promote democracy in Yemen.

New Democrats stand in solidarity with the people of Yemen, and offer them our best wishes as they continue their non-violent struggle for peace and justice.

Grey CupStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

James Lunney Conservative Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, on Sunday afternoon Canadian fans are set for the football showdown of the year at Vancouver's B.C. Place as the B.C. Lions compete for their sixth Grey Cup, this time on home field.

After a slow start to the season, Lions roared back to win 11 of their last 12 games. Lions fans have had lots to cheer about watching our team finish first in the regular season and clinch the western final last week against Edmonton.

Under the direction of head coach Wally Buono, I am sure we will see plenty of offence from Arland Bruce, Paris Jackson, Geroy Simon, quarterback Travis Lulay, and field goal specialist Paul McCallum.

Vancouver Island Raiders alumnus Andrew Harris, number 33, has had a great season with the Lions, and thousands of fans from Vancouver Island will be cheering him on.

Lions are hungry. Fans are revved up. Look out Bombers. Go Lions.

Access to InformationStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the Federal Court of Appeal decision on access to information documents, the judge specifically warned against the ethics committee interfering in the work of the courts.

It is very similar to what the Parliamentary Law Clerk said warning against Conservative interference. Yesterday the Information Commissioner warned against Conservative interference.

If the Conservatives have truly had their road to Damascus moment when it comes to access to information, they need to show more of a true and humble conversion, and maybe they could look at their own backyards.

The Information Commissioner has said the Conservative ministers are a “black hole of accountability”. She listed their failures as “off the chart” and a “red alert”. The commissioner even calls the Prime Minister's own department as the “antithesis of the duty to assist”.

We all know these out of touch Conservatives have one set of rules for themselves and one set of rules for everybody else, but I would suggest that they take a bit of a pause from their full out attack on the CBC, and begin looking in their own backyards and deal with their own black hole of—

Access to InformationStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for Selkirk—Interlake.

Grey CupStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

James Bezan Conservative Selkirk—Interlake, MB

Mr. Speaker, out in B.C. they may have flirted with an orange crush earlier this year, but in 1958, 1984, 1988 and 2011 Conservatives won strong, stable majority governments.

In 1958, 1984 and 1988 the Winnipeg Blue Bombers won the Grey Cup. It is 2011 and the Bombers are going to win the Grey Cup on Sunday, too.

We Manitobans love swaggerville and 2011 has been a great year for the Big Blue, much like another Canadian political team associated with the colour blue.

In fact, 2011 has already been a great year for Winnipeg and Manitoba sports fans. It is going to get even better this weekend as I join football fans cheering on the Bombers in B.C. Place.

We are ready for our first Grey Cup in 21 years. With the leadership of our CFL all-stars Brendon LaBatte, Odell Willis, Jovon Johnson, Jonathan Hefney, and Ian Logan, we will remind all Canadians that blue, not orange but blue, is Canada's colour.

There is no better way to celebrate our final season in our team's old home than by winning it all. Go, Bombers, go.

René MaheuStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Liberal Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Mr. Speaker, René Maheu passed away on November 12, surrounded by his children and loved ones. René was the husband of our late colleague Shirley Maheu. For decades, René was one of the most active volunteers in Saint-Laurent, volunteering for the chamber of commerce, the optimist club, the United Way and the hospital foundation. In addition, René was the chief organizer for the Liberal Party of Canada in Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, in election after election, fundraiser after fundraiser, and one membership campaign after another. He did all this without complaint and with his nose to the grindstone because he believed in his party and his member of Parliament. Even on his death bed, he wanted to make calls about a benefit for the party.

In addition to René Maheu, I want to thank all of the party faithful—the supporters of all democratic parties—who, spurred on by their convictions, advance our democracy. They are what fuel our democracy, a forever-renewable energy, that is, as long as we keep in our hearts and minds the memory of fine people such as René Maheu.

The EnvironmentStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Rick Dykstra Conservative St. Catharines, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am glad I am following the godfather of the carbon tax.

The Liberal member for Vancouver Quadra wants to punish the Canadian economy with a tax on everything. She is not alone.

The member for Saint-Laurent—Cartierville has called for a global carbon tax. Families would pay more for gas, more for electricity, and more for everything else. That is the Liberal vision for Canada. A Liberal carbon tax on everything would hurt Canadian families and job creators.

The interim Liberal leader called for the end of tax credits for children, transit users and workers. The Liberals continue to call for higher taxes on job creators. These are reminders of the Liberals' hidden agenda of imposing a massive new tax on everything if they ever get the chance.

Just like its NDP friend, the Liberal Party has no new ideas other than high taxes for Canadian families. When the Liberal member for Avalon had a moment of clarity on the issue in 2008, he said, “Liberals should not kid themselves. It's going to be a tough sell”.

White Ribbon CampaignStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Joe Comartin NDP Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow marks the beginning of this year's White Ribbon Campaign, a time for men to unite and say “no” to violence against women.

Of course, this landmark campaign would not have been possible in the first place without the passion and dedication of our former leader, Jack Layton. He co-founded the White Ribbon Campaign back in 1991. Working out of a bedroom in Jack's house, he created a vision where men took greater responsibility and worked together to end violence against women.

While he may no longer be with us, Jack's vision is as strong as ever. Today, the White Ribbon Campaign has spread to 60 countries, with millions of men taking up the cause.

Starting tomorrow, I encourage all men to don a white ribbon and stand up against gender violence.

Violence against women can never be justified. It is up to all of us, men and women together, to put an end to it once and for all.

New Democratic Party of CanadaStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Rodney Weston Conservative Saint John, NB

Mr. Speaker, the NDP recently voted against helping the manufacturing sector stay strong; against helping small businesses hire more people; against tax credits for families, like the family caregiver tax credit and the children's arts tax credit; and against the volunteer firefighters tax credit.

The NDP opposes creating jobs. Then, to drive the point home, its members go abroad and attack Canada.

The NDP chooses to side with a small group of activists protesting against our energy resources. However, it also opposes other industries, such as mining, sealing, forestry, auto manufacturing, and trucking, just to name a few.

The NDP also wants to hit families and job creators with a job killing tax hike that would hurt our economy and set families back.

Undermining the economy and attacking Canadian jobs are yet more worrying examples that the ineffective, disunited NDP is unfit to govern.