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House of Commons Hansard #65 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was panama.

Topics

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, I know the hon. member was not here at the time, but some of the members of the NDP were here when we promised Canadians back in 2006 that we would reduce the GST by two points. Then we came to this place and in our first budgets we proposed reducing the GST by two points for the entire country. Who voted against it? All the members of the NDP.

Those members have a lot of nerve coming here talking about tax reductions. They do not believe in them. They just talk about it. However, when the times comes to vote, they are not there.

LabourOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Lawrence Toet Conservative Elmwood—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, the collective agreement between Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, representing locomotive engineers, and CN Railway will expire on December 31 of this year. A work stoppage at a national railway would have a significant impact on the economy and on local communities.

Could the Minister of Labour please give the House an update on the status of the labour negotiations at CN?

LabourOral Questions

3 p.m.

Halton Ontario

Conservative

Lisa Raitt ConservativeMinister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for giving me the opportunity to inform the House that indeed a tentative agreement was reached by both parties on Saturday before the expiration of their old contract. The best solution in any dispute is the one that the parties reach themselves.

A reliable transportation system is crucial to Canada's economic growth. Our transportation network accounts for 4.1% of our GDP, employing over 900,000 Canadians moving $1 trillion worth of goods to markets. We are the most trade dependent nation in the G8, so we require a system that is modern, efficient and reliable. I thank CN and its users.

Democratic Republic of the CongoOral Questions

December 12th, 2011 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Sadia Groguhé NDP Saint-Lambert, QC

Mr. Speaker, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, security forces have attacked demonstrators and fired on those who are challenging last week's election results. Canadians are concerned about the escalating violence in that country.

The international community has to act swiftly to prevent there being more victims.

What is Canada doing to defend human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo?

Democratic Republic of the CongoOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Ottawa West—Nepean Ontario

Conservative

John Baird ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I share the concern with the member opposite. I also shared the concern with the member for Ottawa—Vanier who raised this issue last week.

Canada spoke out very loudly and clearly on this issue this past Friday. We are tremendously concerned about the transparency of the election results and the potential for violence. We are calling on all parties to reject violence. We would like an examination to ensure that all results are posted in a transparent way so we can ensure the vote was truly democratic and fair.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, in the wake of the important negotiations in Durban last week, my question is about Canada's ongoing commitment to remain within the Kyoto protocol. On December 17, 2002, the House voted to ratify it. The House also voted on February 14, 2007, on the Kyoto Protocol Implementation Act. Will the government either commit to not legally withdrawing, to staying in the process, or allowing the House the opportunity to debate the issue?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Calgary Centre-North Alberta

Conservative

Michelle Rempel ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment

Mr. Speaker, as we have said already today, we are very encouraged by the talks that happened in Durban over the weekend. We have seen an international will to move forward and put together an agreement that sees all major emitters around the table. The Kyoto protocol does not cover this. We are very excited about this positive development.

Instead of raising these points, I would ask my colleague opposite to work with the government in its sector-by-sector regulatory approach and not vote against our important budgetary measures to address climate change adaptation and regulation.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I wish to draw the attention of members to the presence in our gallery of Jacques Chagnon, the Speaker of the Quebec National Assembly.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I would also like to mention the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Glen Abernethy, Minister of Justice, Minister of Human Resources and Minister Responsible for the Public Utilities Board for the Northwest Territories.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I would also like to draw the attention of members to the presence in the gallery of the 2011 Governor General's Canadian History Awards recipients: Chad Howie, Sarah Beech, Sylvia Smith, Shantelle Browning-Morgan, Andrew Stickings, Flora Fung, Raymond Bédard, Eric Ruel, Guilaine Maroist, Michel Ducharme, Carol Pauzé, Cybèle Robichaud, Pat Rowe, Joan Karstens and Richard Pelletier.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Commissioner of LobbyingRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Pursuant to section 10.5 of the Lobbying Act, it is my duty to present to the House a report on investigation from the Commissioner of Lobbying.

Government Response to PetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre Saskatchewan

Conservative

Tom Lukiwski ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8) I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to two petitions.

Veterans AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Greg Kerr Conservative West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the second report of the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs in relation to commemorative celebrations in the 21st century.

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Joe Preston Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 12th report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs. The committee advises that pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(2) the Subcommittee on Private Members' Business met to consider the items on the order of precedence between November 17 and December 6 and recommended the items listed herein, which it has determined should not be designated non-votable, be considered by the House.

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Pursuant to Standing Order 91.1(2) the report is deemed adopted.

(Motion agreed to)

Status of WomenCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my duty to present, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Committee on Status of Women in the 41st Parliament. The work on this report began in the early spring of 2010 and was initiated by the committee of the 40th Parliament because of its profound concern related to the tragedy of nearly 600 missing and murdered aboriginal women. The loss and abuse of our sisters compelled us to look at the root causes, depth and possible solutions for the violence experienced by aboriginal women.

While the committee was unable to complete its work before the May 2011 election, the committee submitted a draft report with the promise that the committee of the 41st Parliament would complete the work and make recommendations to the government in regard to the solutions brought forward by aboriginal women themselves to the great harm that such violence perpetrates.

I would like to thank the clerk, Michelle Tittley, and the analysts, Havi Echenberg and Laura Munn-Rivard, for their commitment to helping the committee complete this challenging report.

Status of WomenCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Mylène Freeman NDP Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, the original purpose of the study of violence against Aboriginal women was to gain a better understanding of the extent and nature of violence, examine the root causes and recommend solutions in consultation with Aboriginal women.

This report does not do that. Over 150 witnesses spoke to the committee and offered sound recommendations to the government.

I am very sad to announce that the report tabled in the House today has virtually nothing in common with the testimony. The report omits huge portions of the content heard during testimony, offers no recommendations whatsoever that would commit the government to act, and does not acknowledge the humanitarian crisis facing aboriginal women.

This report does not really broach the subject of violence. It is nothing but a list of government programs. And yet, the committee did not hear most of the contents of this report. The programs described as solutions in this report were never mentioned. The final report silences aboriginal women in an attempt to clear the government of all responsibility.

New Democrats have written a dissenting opinion to make recommendations based on the witness testimony. New Democrats will honour the testimony aboriginal women offered us. We will work on collaborative, consultative solutions to end the systemic violence. We will never be complacent to this crisis.

Status of WomenCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I see other members rising to make comments, but I should read Standing Order 35(2). It states:

Upon presentation of a report accompanied by supplementary or dissenting opinions or recommendations pursuant to Standing Order 108(1)(a), a committee member of the Official Opposition representing those who supported the opinion or opinions expressed in the appended material may also rise to give a succinct explanation thereof.

Therefore, I am afraid the hon. member for Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel is the only one who can speak to this report at this time.

The EnvironmentPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Liberal Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present two petitions this afternoon. The first one is on ozone monitoring.

The petitioners say that the following are examples of questions the government has failed to answer on ozone. Why have both the minister and the parliamentary secretary repeatedly said that there will be no cuts to ozone monitoring despite their own briefing document titled, “Ozone monitoring cuts”? Will monitoring be maintained in the lower atmosphere? By what percentage, in terms of money and positions, was the experimental studies division to be cut? What percentage has been cut? Do Brewers and ozonesondes perform the sound task?

The petitioners therefore call upon the Minister of the Environment to develop a plan to ensure the integrity of the ozone monitoring program and commission a report to assess the adequacy of Canadian contributions to the global observing system for climate in support of the United Nations framework convention on climate change.

Multiple SclerosisPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Kirsty Duncan Liberal Etobicoke North, ON

Mr. Speaker, my second petition is regarding CCSVI.

The government claims most of what I am asking for in Bill C-280 is already under way. This is absolutely not the case.

First, follow-up care remains a problem today and has not been adequately addressed.

Second, phase I/II trials will not put Canada at the forefront of international research.

Third, funding for trials has still not been provided.

Fourth, there is no advisory panel composed of CCSVI experts.

Fifth, I am suggesting that clinical trials begin in Canada by March 1, 2012. The government is suggesting that CIHR announce the successful research team by then.

Therefore, the petitioners call for the Minister of Health to consult experts—

Multiple SclerosisPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I am just going to stop the member there. She has had the floor for about two minutes and the Standing Orders do call for a brief or succinct summary of the petitions. I just want to ensure she does not have any other petitions to present.

SeniorsPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition, signed by a significant number of people across the country, in response to a motion that I brought to the House in June of this year, calling on the government to take action against the rising levels of poverty among Canadian seniors.

As members will recall, that motion passed the House, but unfortunately we have seen no real action. The government talks a good game and provided less than half of what is needed to raise seniors in Canada out of poverty. In a country this rich, 300,000 seniors living in poverty is not acceptable.

Therefore, I submit this petition.