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House of Commons Hansard #126 of the 40th Parliament, 3rd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was liberals.

Topics

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Provencher Manitoba

Conservative

Vic Toews ConservativeMinister of Public Safety

Mr. Speaker, the heart of the problem is the law now allows the individual to get out of prison after serving one-sixth of his or her sentence.

The New Democratic Party is standing in the way of reforms that would ensure individuals like that serve their debt to society and are not released back on the street to victimize other individuals.

Government appointmentsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Pierre Paquette Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is handing out partisan appointments left, right and centre. After Rights & Democracy and the CRTC, it is now the turn of the CBC to be subjected to the Conservatives' attempts to take control by appointing Pierre Gingras to the board of directors of the crown corporation.

Will the Prime Minister admit that his government is packing the boards of the organizations he wants to control with his party's cronies in order to impose his Conservative ideology?

Government appointmentsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, as I just told the NDP, that accusation is completely false. Mr. Gingras will do a very good job at the CBC. I would also like to point out that Mr. Gingras was a candidate for the Liberal Party of Canada, not the Conservative Party, in 2004. He is at arm's length from the government and he will do a good job at the CBC.

Government appointmentsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Bloc

Jean Dorion Bloc Longueuil—Pierre-Boucher, QC

Mr. Speaker, the widow of Rémy Beauregard, the former president of Rights & Democracy who died while still in office after being harassed by some members of the board of directors appointed by the Conservatives, said she is stunned and deeply shocked by the renewal of Jacques Gauthier's and Elliot Tepper's terms. She is calling on the Minister of Foreign Affairs to reverse, and I quote, “this completely irrational decision”.

Will the minister listen to Suzanne Trépanier, who is calling for the removal of these board members?

Government appointmentsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we informed the opposition of our intention to renew the terms of some board members. As with other appointments to Rights & Democracy, we are consulting the opposition in the hope of obtaining a positive response. If the opposition members have strong opinions and wish to make constructive comments, we would be pleased to listen to them. This is the standard procedure for such appointments.

International Co-operationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Liberal Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Teachers' Federation Project Overseas is now in its 50th year. It has sent nearly 2,000 teachers to over 50 countries to train teachers, develop curriculums and teach children.

Canada has made a commitment to help these countries meet their millennium development goals, but the Conservative government is abandoning its responsibility to these children.

How can the Conservatives spend $2 million on a fake lake, while they cut $2 million to help kids learn in developing countries?

International Co-operationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday and last Friday, this decision was made at the program level in the agency. We understand that agency officials expressed concern with CTF regarding a lack of focus, a lack of sustainability and a lack of budgetary information.

CTF is more than welcome to address these issues and to apply for funding under the new call for proposals.

International Co-operationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Maria Minna Liberal Beaches—East York, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is unacceptable.

In Kenya, Canadian teachers have trained 3,600 teachers who in turn are now teaching 350,000 kids. The local programs also educate both teachers and students about HIV and AIDS in Kenya.

Teachers in Sierra Leone have said that without our good Canadian teachers the country will fail to meet its development goals.

These volunteer teachers help save lives, empower women and reduce poverty.

Once more, how can the Conservatives find $2 million for PMO press clippings, but find nothing for dedicated teachers abroad?

International Co-operationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Newmarket—Aurora Ontario

Conservative

Lois Brown ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Cooperation

Mr. Speaker, our government is bringing real accountability to development funding to ensure that taxpayer dollars bring real results.

Canadian International Development Agency staff have been working with the Canadian Teachers' Federation for the last six months to help it adapt its program to the funding criteria. CTF knows full well why the agency refused its proposal.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Nathan Cullen NDP Skeena—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, after a completely inadequate review process, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission gave the green light to ship more than 1,600 tonnes of radioactive waste through the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway. Only a few hours of hearings were held to rush through a scheme that would impact the drinking water of more than 40 million people.

People in places like Owen Sound, Windsor, Sarnia, Toronto, Montreal and Trois Rivières are hardly fearmongering. They are deeply concerned for their own safety and the safety of their families.

The minister must step in now and stop this dangerous nuclear shipment. Will he finally listen to the concerns of Canadians and stop this radioactive flotilla?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, this is fearmongering of the worst sort.

Paragraph 48 of the decision clearly notes that surface radiation from one steam generator is no more than one would find in a package of medical isotopes, the same packages that are delivered in each hospital every day in the country.

I do not know why the member is once again trying to undermine the credibility of a quasi-judicial organization, which is arm's-length from the government.

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Fin Donnelly NDP New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the federal court ruled that the government must protect orca whales and their critical habitat on the Pacific coast.

Because these majestic whales are in danger, they are protected under the Species at Risk Act. Now we learn the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans plans to appeal this decision, arguing DFO has no duty to protect Canada's orcas.

Why is the minister wasting time and money on an appeal rather than doing her duty and protecting this important icon in British Columbia?

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of Fisheries and Oceans

Mr. Speaker, it is also our duty to speak for the fishing industry. To appeal this decision is in the best interest of Canadians and the fishing industry.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Conservative Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, John Diefenbaker was a champion of human rights throughout his public life, culminating in the adoption of the Bill of the Rights in 1960, something he regarded as the caps on his career.

Today Canadians learned that the Government of Canada has created a prestigious new human rights award named after John George Diefenbaker. Could the Minister of Foreign Affairs inform the House about this award?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Pontiac Québec

Conservative

Lawrence Cannon ConservativeMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Diefenbaker award will honour individuals and groups showing exceptional courage and leadership in defending human rights and freedoms. This annual award also reflects our government's strong support for human rights and the efforts of individuals and organizations to promote freedom and democracy worldwide, often under very difficult circumstances.

Our government will continue to be a relentless advocate of human rights around the world.

CensusOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative head count in our far north is already under way without the long form census.

As Elisapee Sheutiapik, the mayor of Iqaluit, told the industry committee this summer:

—to keep Canada strong, we need to know how the country is changing, where people live, work, and raise their families. This census helps us do that.

Poverty, hidden homelessness and education are serious challenges for people of the north. How does the government plan to address them with only a head count survey?

CensusOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for giving me an opportunity to report on the success so far of the initial stages of the census and the national household survey.

She is right. We have already started to roll out, in advance of the May national census, the short form in northern Canada, as well the national household survey. She would be pleased to know that so far all of these are an absolute success.

CultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Carole Lavallée Bloc Saint-Bruno—Saint-Hubert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the end of the assistance program for literary and artistic magazines with low circulation will have a dramatic effect on French-language periodicals. Forty-four specialized periodicals are being threatened as a result of yet another ridiculous decision by the Department of Canadian Heritage. After targeting the performing arts by eliminating assistance for tours and after introducing a bill that robs creators of their income, the Conservatives are now attacking literary publications for no reason.

When will the Conservatives stop picking on the cultural sector?

CultureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Port Moody—Westwood—Port Coquitlam B.C.

Conservative

James Moore ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, these changes to government policy were announced a year and a half ago and the Bloc Québécois is just now opening its eyes and seeing what was done. We established our policy in this regard after consulting with cultural organizations. In addition, more Quebec periodicals than ever will receive federal government subsidies as a result of these changes. We are increasing funding; we are not making any cuts. We are protecting culture throughout Canada, including in Quebec.

AgricultureOral Questions

February 8th, 2011 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Alex Atamanenko NDP British Columbia Southern Interior, BC

Mr. Speaker, I received over 12,700 letters of support for my private member's bill, Bill C-474. This bill would protect farmers from economic harm that could arise from GE crops of which our export markets want no part.

B.C. fruit growers in the Okanagan and Similkameen Valley are saying that they are dead against the release of a genetically modified non-browning apple. They are worried about cross-pollination, which could kill the organic apple industry.

Why is the government continuing to take farmers for granted and refusing to protect them against the release of genetically modified crops, like alfalfa, wheat and apples?

AgricultureOral Questions

3 p.m.

Battlefords—Lloydminster Saskatchewan

Conservative

Gerry Ritz ConservativeMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food and Minister for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, I know this evening we will have five hours of this. Certainly this is an appetizer.

However, I can assure members that every farm group across the country stands with sound science and the regulatory system that we already enjoy.

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Armstrong Conservative Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, NS

Mr. Speaker, Canadians lose confidence in the justice system when the severity of the punishment no longer matches the severity of the crime committed.

Sexual offences committed against our children are the most deplorable acts imaginable, committed against our most vulnerable citizens, the youth of this nation.

What is the Minister of Justice doing to ensure that those who commit these deplorable acts do not get off with a simple slap on the wrist?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Niagara Falls Ontario

Conservative

Rob Nicholson ConservativeMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am proud our government has introduced legislation that proposes mandatory jail time for sexual offences against children. We are also proposing increasing penalties for seven child-specific sexual offences that ensure conditional sentences or house arrest are never available for any of these crimes.

What we really need is for the Liberal-led coalition to step up to the plate and start supporting these important changes. The message from this government is clear: if people commit a sexual offence against a child, they will go to jail.

CensusOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, late last year the legislative assembly of the Northwest Territories unanimously passed a motion to retain the long form census. The House also passed a motion, my private member's bill, to reinstate the long form census at second reading.

When will the current government put the “count” back into accountability, restore the long form census and ensure that the people living in our majestic north are counted in to the real solutions for northern sovereignty?

CensusOral Questions

3 p.m.

Parry Sound—Muskoka Ontario

Conservative

Tony Clement ConservativeMinister of Industry

Mr. Speaker, I already indicated to the House that so far initial indications are very promising with the response rate for both the short form census and the national household survey. I am sure the hon. member will join with me in appreciating the fact that Canadians are filling out both the national household survey and the short form census and will join me in encouraging Canadians to fill their responsibilities and make the choice when it comes to the long form census.