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House of Commons Hansard #21 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-10.

Topics

Citizenship and ImmigrationStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro Liberal York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the past 10 months have been a time of historic change for millions living in places like Yemen, Egypt and Libya.

Starting in Tunisia and sweeping across the Arab world, the winds of change have toppled governments and altered social structures in ways that most of us could never have foreseen. However, inasmuch as some things have changed, much has not. In places like Syria, human rights are regularly violated by the state, particularly for those practising Christianity.

Canada is known for its religious tolerance and human rights protections, and because of this, many persecuted souls have already completed their paperwork to make a new life for themselves here in Canada. In many cases, security and health checks have already occurred, and all that remains is approval from the minister and the department.

The Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism has it within his power to address this problem and to prevent further abuses from befalling these desperate people, so I ask why he has not done so.

JerusalemStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

James Lunney Conservative Nanaimo—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, this past summer I visited the death camps at Majdanek and Auschwitz. I saw young people weeping before mounds of human ashes, shoes of victims, mass graves and monstrous crematoria.

Sadly, the threat to the Jewish people is still with us today. It is clear in the determination of those sworn to destroy the collective Jew, the Jewish state.

The world needs a strong Israel. Israel needs secure borders and neighbours who recognize the state and choose peace.

There are those who advocate dividing Jerusalem, separating the Old City, historic Jerusalem, from the Jewish state, leaving a state without a soul.

The recent Basel Declaration highlights the San Remo commitment of 1920 and the Mandate for Palestine approved by the League of Nations in 1922, solemn commitments that gave the legal foundation for the modern state of Israel, including Jerusalem.

In the pursuit of justice and peace in the Middle East, I urge all nations to handle Jerusalem carefully. The stakes are high; the cost of failure will impact every nation.

Mystery Novel AwardsStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

François Lapointe NDP Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, for 10 years a yearly gala for the Prix du roman policier has been held in the municipality of Saint-Pacôme, in Kamouraska. Well-known mystery novelists have passed through Saint-Pacôme, including Patrick Sénécal and Chrystine Brouillet. The 2011 awards were presented on Saturday, September 24.

I would like to quote this year's recipient, Martin Michaud, who won for his novel La chorale du diable. He said, “The Prix Saint-Pacôme du roman policier plays a huge role in promoting...Quebec culture...a vital part of the Canadian identity.”

I would like to pay tribute to the volunteers and bibliophiles who have succeeded in making this a worthy national event while still maintaining its local roots. I would also like to pay tribute to the elected municipal officials who promote this gala.

In conclusion, I congratulate the winners in the category for junior short story: Flavie Gauthier-Chamard from l'Islet, Catherine Girard from Saint-Prime, and Ève Gaumond from Cacouna.

The people of Saint-Pacôme can be very proud of this event.

Canadian ValuesStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Chungsen Leung Conservative Willowdale, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour and privilege for me to stand in this place today to thank the people of Willowdale for the trust they have placed in me to represent them in the House.

I would also like to thank my wife, Deborah, and my daughter, Elysia, for their support and understanding.

I am honoured to represent a riding such as Willowdale, which is rich in culture and diversity. I believe the diversity provides us our strength as Canadians.

When I became a Canadian citizen over 35 years ago, I was moved by the words of the Right Hon. John Diefenbaker in his definition of a “Canadian”. He said:

I am a Canadian, free to speak without fear, free to worship in my own way, free to stand for what I think right, free to oppose what I believe wrong, or free to choose those who shall govern my country. This heritage of freedom I pledge to uphold for myself and all mankind.

These words from our former prime minister describe the Canadian values that we all hold and that we all, in this place, must defend.

CancerStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Mike Lake Conservative Edmonton—Mill Woods—Beaumont, AB

Mr. Speaker, today my thoughts are with two friends back in Edmonton, who are inspiring literally thousands of people as they each battle aggressive forms of cancer.

Calvin Kuhn and Kristen Fersovitch are 44 and 28 respectively, both married, with young children. In Kristen's case, her three kids are all under four years of age.

In the face of unexpected and considerable adversity, both Calvin and Kristen are models of faith and courage. Invariably, those who visit them with a mind to cheer them up come away themselves immeasurably more encouraged. It is impossible to spend time with either of them and not leave with a renewed awareness of the purpose and the people in your own life.

Calvin and Kristen are daily living out the words of the apostle Paul, who counselled the Thessalonians to:

Be joyful always; pray continually; give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.

May they know that we are inspired by their joy, united with them in prayer and ever thankful for the remarkable model of faith in the most heart-wrenching of circumstances.

The EconomyStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Chris Charlton NDP Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, when the Conservatives cancelled the long form census, we knew that they were abandoning evidence-based decision-making in favour of implementing their narrowly partisan agenda.

The proof was in the pudding last week, when they introduced the omnibus crime bill.

Despite a well-documented 20-year decline in the crime rate and an acknowledgement by even U.S. Republicans that increased incarceration has done nothing to reduce recidivism, the Conservatives are ploughing ahead with mandatory minimum sentences and megajails, all evidence be damned.

Regrettably, the government is adopting the same ostrich-like approach to dealing with the current economic turmoil. The Prime Minister cannot just stick his head in the sand and ignore the fact that 1.4 million Canadians are out of work, that the unemployment rate for students was a staggering 17% this summer, that Moody's is reporting record levels of household debt and that every senior economist is warning of another deep recession.

Canadians need, and deserve, their government's support. Glibly suggesting that we are in a relatively stronger position than countries like Greece is an insult to the hard-working Canadians and seniors who are worried about making ends meet.

The time is now for the government to finally acknowledge the legitimate concerns of Canadians, act on the evidence and present a credible plan to safeguard Canadian jobs and our economy.

Chinese CanadiansStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Wai Young Conservative Vancouver South, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today regarding an issue of great importance to the Chinese community in Vancouver south and across Canada.

Earlier this year the CBC reported that many leaders in Canada's cultural communities had called upon the Liberal Party to fire its current outreach leader after he made objectionable and discriminatory statements.

Chinese media have recently reported that after the story appeared on the CBC, the Liberal multiculturalism critic called the leader in the Chinese community in Toronto and said, “I'm glad you've learned to write English.”

It is deeply offensive to imply that Canadian citizens of Chinese origin cannot speak or write English. The Liberal Party should be ashamed of itself. When will it learn to respect Chinese Canadians and the important contributions we have made to this great country and not insult hundreds of thousands of us by mocking our English?

Riding of Compton—StansteadStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Jean Rousseau NDP Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, since this is my first speech here in the House, I would like to sincerely thank the people of Compton—Stanstead for their courage in voting for change.

Having been elected, I vowed to work for everyone in my riding, regardless of their allegiance and their beliefs. Over the next four years, I will try to help this government, which was elected by only 39% of Canadians, to see its social and economic policies more clearly in order to guarantee a more prosperous and fair future for all Canadians.

I would also like to congratulate the organizers of the Virée gourmande, or gourmet tour, that was held on September 24 and 25 as part of the Comptonales festival. The goal of this agro-food event was to highlight the quality and contributions of the region's farmers, whose products are the pride of the region. Whether at the Ferland orchard, BioBon, the Tremblay winery, Domaine Ives Hill or the Fromagerie La Station, just to name a few, the determination—

Riding of Compton—StansteadStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order, please. The hon. member for Calgary East.

ZambiaStatements By Members

September 27th, 2011 / 2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai Conservative Calgary East, AB

Mr. Speaker, there is some good news coming from Africa. Canada congratulates President Michael Sata on his election as Zambia's new leader. We also applaud all candidates and the Zambian people on their role in bringing about a peaceful political transition through the ballot box.

We would also like to congratulate the outgoing president, President Banda, who has accepted the will of the Zambian people and has peacefully transitioned power to the newly elected president. This is another example of Africa's drive towards building stronger democratic institutions and principles on the continent.

Zambia remains a key partner for Canada. Canada contributed to the Zambian electoral process through the United Nations and the Commonwealth. Two Canadian officials took part in the European Union's election observation mission.

Our best wishes to the Zambian people.

World Tourism DayStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Liberal Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, today is World Tourism Day.

Today we have an opportunity to celebrate the beauty that makes our country an attractive destination.

Canadians could spend a lifetime travelling and experiencing different sceneries, cultures and traditions without ever stepping foot outside Canada. Generations of Canadians have sewn our flag on their backpacks and cultivated respect abroad.

However, the way we are perceived in the world is changing and we must call on our government to do everything it can to restore our precious reputation.

Canada must raise its profile again in the eyes of the international public by accepting South Korea's invitation to Expo 2012.

We must reinstate the GST rebate for travellers, lower uncompetitive airport rents, taxes and fees and reconsider the new visa requirements that have deterred international visitors to support our important tourism businesses.

I encourage all Canadians to continue to enjoy the beauty of our country.

War MemorialsStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, our cenotaphs and monuments are powerful reminders of the sacrifices made by generations of Canadians. They are symbolic places where people can gather in memory of our fellow Canadians, our loved ones and family members who served our country in the name of peace and the freedom we all enjoy today.

Unfortunately, this morning we learned that a war memorial in Girouard Park in Montreal had been vandalized. We have an obligation to preserve and respect memorials in tribute to the service and sacrifices of our men and women in uniform.

I commend Sergeant Jones, who notified the police about this vandalism, and I hope the guilty parties will be held accountable for the seriousness of their mischief.

Wangari MaathaiStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin NDP Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was with great sadness that I learned of the death yesterday of Wangari Maathai, the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

An advocate for environmental protection, democracy and women's rights in Africa, this great lady from Kenya was able to turn words into action all her life.

Ms. Maathai established the Green Belt Movement, which planted 30 million trees in order to combat soil erosion.

She was also the co-chair of the Congo Basin Forest Fund, established to protect the second-largest rainforest in the world, which plays an important role in the fight against climate change.

Ms. Maathai believed that the future of the human race is inextricably tied to respect for and the preservation of our environment, and that it is possible to protect forests and pursue sustainable economic development at the same time.

I invite the House to salute and pay tribute to the memory of an exemplary pioneer who was known as “the woman who planted trees”.

JusticeStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Kelly Block Conservative Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar, SK

Mr. Speaker, earlier today the interim leader of the third party called the safe streets and communities act “dumb on crime”. Dumb on crime? This is from the same party whose former public safety critic said that its primary public safety concern was inmate morale. Sadly, out-of-touch statements like this are not surprising from the Liberals.

The safe streets and communities act is reasonable and tough, and it is what Canadians gave us a mandate to do. For example, it stops those who have committed sexual offences against children from getting pardons.

We believe that often while a criminal's jail term may end, the suffering caused to his or her victims will last a lifetime. Canadians have been clear. It is unacceptable to ever forget the harm that child molesters have caused their victims.

I call on the Liberals to finally put the rights of law-abiding Canadians ahead of the rights of convicted criminals and support the safe streets and communities act.

Government MinistersOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel NDPLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in his Guide for Ministers and Ministers of State, the Prime Minister says, and I quote:

As a Minister, you are individually accountable to Parliament for the discharge of all responsibilities vested in you. You must answer all questions pertaining to your areas of responsibility...

Can the Prime Minister tell us what happens when his ministers do not follow his guide?

Government MinistersOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this government has established rules and these rules are enforced. I think that the Leader of the Opposition is talking about a specific situation. The minister responsible has answered questions a number of times in the House of Commons.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel NDPLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has not taken any action in the face of the coming economic crisis. Since we returned, we have not seen any initiatives or any action plan. The only bill introduced has nothing to do with the economy, unless the Prime Minister is telling us that more prisons are the key to the recovery. The Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance are meeting with the Governor of the Bank of Canada today.

Will we have a job plan tomorrow?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this government is continuing with a plan that has been a big success. That is why Canada has created many more jobs than the vast majority of industrialized countries. Obviously, we reject the NDP's proposals to increase taxes and shut down key industries in the Canadian economy. Such proposals would kill employment and this government will never agree to those kinds of NDP proposals.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer Québec

NDP

Nycole Turmel NDPLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the consensus among economists and business gurus is that the Canadian economy will slow down. We are facing another recession.

The chief economist for BMO Nesbitt Burns compares the Prime Minister to President Hoover, who brought on the Great Depression by responding, like this government, with austerity measures.

Why will the Prime Minister not bring forward a job creation plan instead?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the government's plans are oriented toward job creation, which is why Canada has one of the best job creation records in the entire industrialized world. That is the path we will continue to pursue.

We seek, obviously, any useful ideas from the opposition on how we can improve Canada's performance, but we will tell you that what they have proposed lately, raising taxes and shutting down key industries, are not proposals that will create jobs and not proposals that this government will ever accept.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash NDP Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' failure to act has proven to be an economic disaster for young workers. Today there are 110,000 fewer jobs for young people than before the recession, and the unemployment rate is over 14%, not counting the thousands of young people who abandoned the labour market and are now on social assistance or living on the street. Canada cannot deprive itself of its talented youth.

Where is the Conservatives' plan to put our young people back to work?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, in the second phase of Canada's economic action plan there is a hiring credit for the 525,000 small businesses in Canada. I hope that the official opposition will support these measures to help job creation in Canada.

We remain focused on the economy and job growth, and I welcome any useful suggestions the member opposite has.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peggy Nash NDP Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, we have seen just how out of touch the government is. Conservatives are boasting about precarious jobs, part-time jobs, jobs that pay just half of what they did before the recession because of Conservative economic mismanagement.

Canada has lost too many good, high-skilled, highly paid manufacturing jobs. TD Bank says these workers, if they can find work, are now paid an average of $10,000 less a year.

Where is the Conservative plan to create good jobs. Where is the jobs plan?

The EconomyOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the plan is working.

I hear what the member opposite asserts; of course, it is not accurate. We have created about 600,000 net new jobs in the Canadian economy in past couple of years, of which 80% are full-time jobs for Canadians.

This is just the opposite of what the official opposition, the NDP, suggests. What the NDP suggests is a brand new tax increase of $10 billion on Canadian business to kill jobs in the Canadian economy.

The EconomyOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Rae Liberal Toronto Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, Dr. Sherry Cooper of BMO Nesbitt Burns said recently in her newsletter:

We are in danger of repeating the deflationary policies that caused the 1929 stock market crash and the Great Depression.

She goes on to say:

The misplaced belief that the road to economic prosperity is paved by near-term fiscal tightening, as espoused by our Prime Minister...shows we have learned nothing from Herbert Hoover's response to the Great Depression.

I wonder if the Prime Minister would care to comment on these words from a distinguished economist?