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House of Commons Hansard #173 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was air.

Topics

VeteransOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer NDP Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, many RCMP and military personnel when they are medically released from the RCMP or the military end up on the Canada pension plan disability benefit. The problem is that the amount of money they get for CPP disability is automatically deducted, dollar-for-dollar, from any other form of payment they receive. It does not matter whether they walk out of the military or RCMP or get carried out, their financial burden remains the same.

We are asking the government, will it now stop the CPP disability clawback on the heroes of our country so they can get the pensions they so richly deserve?

VeteransOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney ConservativeMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that on this side of the House we are standing up and delivering for our veterans. Whether we look at the Auditor General or the ombudsman, they acknowledge the effort we have made, and also our stakeholders. Ray Kokkonen, from the united peacekeeping mission, has said that we are heading in the right direction with the decision not to appeal the court decision but going over and beyond by harmonizing our program.

We are moving forward, and I will table legislation to keep on with this good work.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, a government report says that foreign students at Canadian universities benefit our economy, with greater brainpower, innovation and productivity. The minister says he wants more of them to stay, but his treatment of two Nigerian students in Regina sends the contradictory message that foreign students risk unfair, inconsistent and arbitrary abuses of power based on disinformation.

Both the University of Regina and the Government of Saskatchewan oppose deportation of these two young women for a small honest mistake. Will the minister agree?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeMinister of Citizenship

Mr. Speaker, the truth is the opposite of what the member for Wascana just suggested. First of all, one of the students told the CBSA that she had not been enrolled in classes and had been academically disqualified, and she had documents confirming that. Secondly, the system is of course not administered in an arbitrary or political fashion, but rather in an objective fashion, in this instance by the Immigration and Refugee Board. Both of these individuals had hearings before the immigration division before receiving exclusion orders. Both of their social insurance numbers indicated that they did not have permission to work in Canada.

We are open to legal immigrants and to foreign students. We merely ask that people respect our fair rules.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, Dennis Manuge fought the Conservatives in court and won on behalf of disabled veterans. RCMP veterans are now suing the Conservatives but the government refuses to even talk to them.

Yesterday, our brave Afghanistan veterans launched a class action lawsuit because they are being treated like second class citizens by the government. Hundreds of other veterans have been forced to the Federal Court to overturn bad decisions by the veterans appeal board.

Is this how the government stands up and delivers for veterans, by fighting them in court?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney ConservativeMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, coming from a member of the Liberal Party and its years of neglect, I am proud to say that yes, our government is standing up and acting for veterans.

We have been acting unprecedentedly. We created the veterans ombudsman. We created a bill of rights. Moreover, last month I announced that not only are we not appealing the court decision but we are going beyond that decision. We are investing $177.7 million more into the pockets of our veterans. I will table legislation as well to address the war veterans allowance.

We are standing and acting for--

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

The hon. member for New Westminster—Coquitlam.

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Fin Donnelly NDP New Westminster—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, the 2009 Fraser River sockeye salmon collapse should have been a dire warning to the Conservatives about their fisheries mismanagement. However, instead of investing in fishery science and protecting fish habitat, the Conservatives gutted the Fisheries Act and dismantled scientific capacity in DFO. Now B.C. will be left with half the habitat protection staff it had a decade ago.

How does the minister expect to protect wild salmon if he is slashing funding for fishery science in B.C.?

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

3 p.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, we have actually increased funding for fishery science in the last budget. We are focusing on protecting the productivity of Canadian fisheries. Fisheries and Oceans is consolidating its habitat management operations into 16 locations across Canada to provide for better protection of fisheries resources that Canadians value.

A new fisheries protection program will be better positioned to regulate serious harm to fish and the habitats that support them. It is very important.

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Robert Chisholm NDP Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, today Canadians are finally going to get some answers about Conservative fisheries mismanagement from Justice Cohen. After 18 months, $26 million and 150 witnesses, one thing is clear: this report cannot sit on the shelf to gather dust. The stakes are far too high for Canadian fisheries.

Will the government advise us when we can expect an action plan to rehabilitate the Canadian fishery here on the west coast as a starting point?

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

3 p.m.

Egmont P.E.I.

Conservative

Gail Shea ConservativeMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, we certainly recognize the importance of salmon to British Columbia. That is why we commissioned the Cohen commission back in 2009 after the slow returns of sockeye salmon to the Fraser River.

We want to thank Justice Cohen and his team for their hard work and dedication on this report. We are pleased to be tabling it this afternoon.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Wladyslaw Lizon Conservative Mississauga East—Cooksville, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to deepening our relationship with the dynamic and growing countries of the Asia-Pacific. Canada and Hong Kong enjoy a rich and diverse relationship and strong trade and investment ties. Family and cultural ties between Canada and the Philippines are growing every year. Nearly 500,000 people of Filipino origin now call Canada home.

Could the minister please share with the House how our government is building on our strong ties with these countries?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Abbotsford B.C.

Conservative

Ed Fast ConservativeMinister of International Trade and Minister for the Asia-Pacific Gateway

Mr. Speaker, in the past few years our government has been expanding Canada's relationships within the Asia-Pacific region to create jobs and economic benefits right here at home.

Today, the Prime Minister announced that he will travel next month to the Philippines and to Hong Kong, where he will highlight our growing people to people ties and strengthen our already deep and historic relationships.

I look forward to joining him on these visits to further build upon the partnerships that exist between Canada, the Philippines and Hong Kong.

CensusOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett Liberal St. Paul's, ON

Mr. Speaker, yet again, the Conservative government says one thing and does the exact opposite. It fear-mongers about jail time for the mandatory long form census, yet two years later, people can still go to jail if they do not fill out the mandatory short form census, the labour force survey or the census on agriculture.

Will the Conservatives stop the hypocrisy and immediately remove jail time for every type of census in Canada, yes or no?

CensusOral Questions

3 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, quite the contrary. We hope the opposition will agree that Canadians deserve to be treated like adults.

That is why we brought in this reform. We have always believed that, with a balanced approach, we can collect the information needed concerning the long form census. Statistics Canada agrees that this new approach will yield useful and usable data.

We hope to finally have the support of the opposition during this reform.

EmploymentOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Isabelle Morin NDP Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Lachine, QC

Mr. Speaker, our young people are paying the price for the Conservatives' policies. A report released yesterday by certified general accountants, indicates that young people cannot fully realize their potential or develop their skills because available jobs do not match their qualifications. As a result, wages and productivity are affected. In the end, the entire Canadian economy is suffering because of the Conservatives.

Why do they still not have a job creation plan that will allow our young people to use their skills?

EmploymentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we are investing in students and youth, by helping them go to college and university. We have also expanded the youth employment strategy by providing an additional $50 million dollars in the budget this year.

Unfortunately, as always, the NDP opposed these initiatives to help our youth.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

David Tilson Conservative Dufferin—Caledon, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the coming weeks, Canadians across the country will celebrate and remember our country's veterans. We must never forget the sacrifices made by those who selflessly served Canada in defence of our core values and freedoms.

Canada's war memorials are sacred ground. Sadly, there are those who would desecrate these monuments to our veterans. This is unacceptable to our government and to all law-abiding Canadians.

Would the minister please inform this House about the government's position on Bill C-217?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney ConservativeMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, all members should thank the member for Dufferin—Caledon for bringing this important legislation forward.

Our nation's war memorials are sacred ground and those who would dishonour the memory of our veterans should face serious consequences.

This legislation would create a new offence related to protecting war memorials and would establish tough new penalties for anyone who intentionally damages or defiles these permanent tributes to Canada's fallen heroes.

There will be a vote in a few minutes. I encourage all members to support the bill. Our fallen soldiers deserve nothing less.

The Aluminum IndustryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Dany Morin NDP Chicoutimi—Le Fjord, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of State for Small Business and Tourism indicated that the Aluminum Technology Centre in my riding would remain open.

However, he has not said a word about the centre's budget. We are wondering whether the centre will be spared from the Conservative government's irresponsible cuts. The entire aluminum industry in my riding and the workers who make a living in that industry are concerned. The aluminum industry in my riding and throughout the region is very important in terms of the secondary and tertiary processing that make it possible to develop and diversify our economy.

Will the government maintain the Aluminum Technology Centre's budget? It is of the utmost importance.

The Aluminum IndustryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Beauce Québec

Conservative

Maxime Bernier ConservativeMinister of State (Small Business and Tourism)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to reassure the hon. member and the people of Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, Quebec and Canada who benefit from the research done at this centre. As I said yesterday, the government's position is clear: the centre will remain open.

SecuritiesOral Questions

October 31st, 2012 / 3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Louis Plamondon Bloc Bas-Richelieu—Nicolet—Bécancour, QC

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Minister of Finance is still dreaming of getting his hands on Quebec securities. Even after he was turned down by the National Assembly of Quebec and the Supreme Court of Canada, the minister did not try to hide his desire to come back and interfere in this key sector of Quebec's economy.

The minister now seems to want to take a back door approach to accomplish things that he cannot accomplish in the light of day, and clauses 168 and 169 of Bill C-45 are particularly worrisome.

What did the Minister of Finance try to hide in this bill with regard to securities?

SecuritiesOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Whitby—Oshawa Ontario

Conservative

Jim Flaherty ConservativeMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, nothing, actually.

The Supreme Court of Canada has given the federal government as well as the provinces guidance on what our respective constitutional responsibilities are relating to securities, and I said “respective responsibilities”. The Supreme Court of Canada was clear that the federal government has a responsibility, for example, with respect to the global oversight of securities in Canada. The provinces have their own responsibilities with respect to securities.

We have had some continuing discussions with the provinces with respect to this issue and I am hopeful that we will be able to be creative together.

Tabling of DocumentPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

York—Simcoe Ontario

Conservative

Peter Van Loan ConservativeLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, earlier today in question period I made reference to the budget implementation bill of the government of the province of Quebec when the leader of the opposition was a member of that government. I would like to table it right now. It is one of the rarer things that actually dwarfs me at 778 pages in length.

The House resumed from October 25 consideration of the motion that Bill C-217, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (mischief relating to war memorials), be read the third time and passed.