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House of Commons Hansard #77 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was investment.

Topics

National DefenceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

National DefenceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order, please. I see the hon. associate minister has more to say. The House should turn its attention to the minister so he can finish his response.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Julian Fantino Conservative Vaughan, ON

Mr. Speaker, that report is absolutely biased. It has no objectivity whatsoever. It denigrates everything we do in order to help our military men and women do their job, look after jobs for Canadians and do the absolute right thing for the men and women doing these missions.

PensionsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Judy Sgro Liberal York West, ON

Mr. Speaker, during the 2004 campaign, the Prime Minister said that he would never raise the age of retirement to 67. In the campaign of 2006, he said that taxation of income trusts was robbing the nest eggs of our seniors. Do members remember that comment? During the 2008 and 2011 campaigns, he again claimed that transfers to seniors would never be cut.

As he did not keep his promises in 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2011, how can any Canadian trust a Prime Minister who continually breaks his so-called solemn promises?

PensionsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, I recall a promise by the Liberals back in the 1990s to eliminate the GST and yet we still have it.

During four different campaigns, the Liberals promised a national child care plan. The reason they kept promising was that they did not deliver it. By contrast, we promised to reduce the—

PensionsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

PensionsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order, please. There are far too many cross-conversations going on. If members want to talk to their colleagues they can step into one of the lobbies and have a private conversation there but let us not do it across the floor during question period.

The hon. minister has about 10 seconds left to finish her response.

PensionsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Conservative Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, by contrast, we promised to reduce the GST from 7% to 6% to 5% and we did it. By contrast, we promised to bring in a universal childcare benefit and create over 100,000 childcare spaces. We did it and kept our promise.

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Liberal Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, from the chaos surrounding the government's about face on foreign investment in potash more than a year ago, the former minister of Industry promised a new policy, a definition of “net benefit”, greater transparency, enforceable conditions, quick remedies, reciprocity and commercial behaviour by state enterprises. He said that he would act “with alacrity”.

However, now the new Minister of Industry says that there will be no new investment rules, even though the issues are more serious now, not less.

Why is the new minister making a monkey out of the minister from Muskoka?

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Mégantic—L'Érable Québec

Conservative

Christian Paradis ConservativeMinister of Industry and Minister of State (Agriculture)

Mr. Speaker, nothing could be further from the truth. We already made changes in 2009 to provide more transparency and to welcome foreign investment. Those guys, during 10 years, did nothing. They did not want to do anything about transparency. What we do will improve it. We are still improving it.

We will welcome any foreign investment that will have a net benefit for Canada. We will continue working for economic growth and job creation, and not play cheap politics on the backs of the workers as they are doing now.

International TradeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Liberal Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, with the Prime Minister's propaganda machine in full flight from China, his record of failure on the United States gets worse.

Expanding trade elsewhere is important but the U.S. market is crucial, yet the government is proposing to close eight consulates in the United States. Destroying the service and information base so important to promote and defend Canada's trade interests makes no sense. Abandoning Canada's exporters in our largest market is plain stupid. It is not mere speculation, it is a warning shot. Just where is the government's head?

International TradeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, whatever the member says, but let me say it once more quite clearly that this is pure speculation. As of yet, no decision has been made. Foreign Affairs and Canadian diplomats around the world will continue to do Canada proud by protecting Canada's interests and promoting Canadian values.

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, again today, a Tibetan monk tried to set himself on fire. Shortly after first being elected, the Prime Minister said he would make human rights a top priority in our relations with China. Now he is putting trade above everything else. We are not against trade, but human rights have to remain at the forefront. Will the Prime Minister

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order. The hon. member for Laurier—Sainte-Marie.

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, will the Prime Minister truly engage the Chinese authorities on the issue of human rights, or will he just mention it in passing?

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, human rights is one of the government's core principles of foreign policy. Our government will continue having constructive discussions with China on a full range of human rights issues. It is the government's policy to try to develop closer ties with China, as it is vital to Canada's economic prosperity.

I can say in no uncertain terms that human rights remains one of the government's core principles. We will continue constructive engagement with the Chinese on this issue.

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, we are quite pleased to hear that human rights are going to remain at the heart of the discussions, but all the information we are receiving and everything we have seen so far truly leads us to believe that human rights are taking a back seat to other issues.

When are the Conservatives finally going to put as much effort into international issues, like the situation in Syria and human rights issues, as they do into their obsession—

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

The hon. parliamentary secretary.

Human RightsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary East Alberta

Conservative

Deepak Obhrai ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, let me correct the member's information so that she can have the right information.

This government has been very clear in reference to Syria. The killings must stop now. Assad must go. That information has been made very clear.

As far as human rights and the issue of Syria are concerned, the Prime Minister has raised the issues with his Chinese counterpart, giving Canada's position.

I hope the member now has the right information that she was looking for.

Persons with DisabilitiesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet NDP Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to a document obtained by the NDP under the Access to Information Act, 85% of the money in the enabling accessibility fund has gone to Conservative ridings. Coincidence? Not at all.

Time and again successive governments have punished the people who did not vote for them. People are tired of the same old story. The Prime Minister promised to govern for all Canadians. When will he start doing so?

Persons with DisabilitiesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, we are very proud of this program, which has made more than 600 buildings accessible to people with disabilities. That is great.

The awards were made exactly in proportion to the applications received. We are very proud that more Canadians will have access to these facilities.

It is too bad the NDP did not support this program when we brought it in.

Persons with DisabilitiesOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet NDP Hochelaga, QC

Mr. Speaker, that may be so. By the way, we voted against Duplessis's patronage.

With so few Conservative MPs in Quebec, we are not surprised to learn that Quebec is not receiving its fair share. Less than $2 million has gone to the 75 Quebec ridings, but more than $57 million has gone to Conservative ridings.

Where does it say that their strong mandate gives them the right to ignore and neglect thousands of Canadians living with a disability? Why are the Conservatives attacking the vulnerable? Why the double standard?

Persons with DisabilitiesOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Haldimand—Norfolk Ontario

Conservative

Diane Finley ConservativeMinister of Human Resources and Skills Development

Mr. Speaker, our government has done more than any other Canadian government to help the disabled. In addition to the enabling accessibility fund, there are programs that provide financial assistance to the families of the disabled.

The enabling accessibility fund has already made more than 600 buildings accessible to the disabled. It is too bad the opposition did not support it.

National DefenceOral Questions

February 9th, 2012 / 2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Patricia Davidson Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians gave us a strong mandate to protect law-abiding Canadians from those who wish to harm us. Canada is not immune from the threats of radical-led terrorism. Far too often, we see cases where those who would seek to destroy our way of life are plotting to harm us.

Could the Minister of National Defence please tell us what the government is doing to protect us?