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House of Commons Hansard #134 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was scientists.

Topics

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:35 p.m.

NDP

Mylène Freeman NDP Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, this member has talked about all the investments the government is making. I have often been asked by the government if I support its aerospace research and development, for instance. In February, the Montreal aerospace industry said that there is not enough research and development in the aerospace industry in Canada and that the government should be doing a lot more to make us competitive.

Why does the government not understand that it needs to be putting publicly funded research as a priority in order to increase our innovation and competitiveness internationally?

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:35 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Conservative Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, I find the question from my hon. colleague from the NDP quite interesting and somewhat amusing. This is a member of a party claiming to support the aerospace industry, which is largely based in the Montreal area but has other important aspects of the sector across the country.

This is a sector that is anxious to see the government move forward with our next generation fighter aircraft, and of course the NDP finds every opportunity to oppose that. We have renewed our government's commitment with Canada's involvement in the international space station, and we continue to lead the world in the aerospace industry.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:40 p.m.

Independent

Bruce Hyer Independent Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, an internationally famous scientist, Dr. Cynthia Gilmour, is a senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center who has done research all over the world with her team in mercury, acid rain, acid lakes and climate change. She has used the Experimental Lakes Area for experimentation. She is not from this country. She has no political stake in this. This is what she said in a letter last week to the minister involved, “By shutting down ELA, you remove a critical tool for finding the most reasonable and cost-effective solutions to national and international environmental issues. The small federal investment in the research station has been returned thousands of times over in public, in ecosystem, in human health.”

My question to this hon. member, and to every member on that side of the House is, will they all follow in mindless lockstep in muzzling scientists and killing research, or will a few of them dare to stand up to their party?

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:40 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Conservative Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is important to point out that with respect to the Experimental Lakes project, our government is looking to transition this particular project to a partner that will take on responsibility for whatever remaining research priorities there may be.

It is important to point out that our science and technology policy, first developed by this government in 2007, is really unprecedented in the Government of Canada's support for science and technology. As part of that, we embrace and we celebrate the work that our Canadian scientists and researchers do in this country, at our universities, for our federal government departments. We will continue to celebrate the excellent work they provide.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:40 p.m.

Liberal

Frank Valeriote Liberal Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, while the member opposite certainly pointed out some investments that the government has made, I think he has misled us to a certain degree with respect to the exodus of scientists from this country.

The agriculture committee has travelled across Canada on at least one occasion in the last couple of years. All we heard about was the exodus of our scientists to other countries because of the lack of investment by the government in basic science. The agricultural adaptation program was ended completely. It was science-based.

My question to the hon. member is, why would he mislead us like this and suggest that our scientists are staying, when in fact they are leaving this country?

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:40 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Braid Conservative Kitchener—Waterloo, ON

Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Guelph is clearly out of touch. Under the previous Liberal government, there was a brain drain. Since our government has taken office, there has clearly been a brain gain.

We are attracting some of the world's greatest researchers. Many are coming to my riding of Kitchener—Waterloo. I would be happy to host a visit of the hon. member for Guelph to show him the fantastic research that is taking place, not only at our two universities, Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Waterloo, but also at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics and the Institute for Quantum Computing.

He should come on down Highway 7.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:40 p.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is probably a good thing for the member that his time ran out before I had a chance to ask him a question. I would have been asking the member about the RADARSAT Constellation mission. I introduced a motion in the industry committee to have MacDonald, Dettwiler and industry ministry officials come to the committee to explain what has happened with that program and why we are off track. Unfortunately the member opposite who just spoke introduced a motion to take the meeting in camera. I cannot imagine why we would need to discuss such important issues in secret. They concern all Canadians.

I am proud to stand today in defence of science and research. Canada's ability to compete in the 21st century is inextricably linked to science and research. Science and research touch every aspect of our daily lives and must be preserved and enriched. In Canada, we must foster an environment that encourages more research and science. Sadly, the 2012 budget and recent changes by the Conservative government take Canada down a path of darkness rather than enlightenment.

The muzzling of scientists and the assignment of chaperones by the government is repugnant. This has been widely condemned and rightly so. Only ideologues and people afraid of the truth would resort to such actions. If nothing else, scientists must be free to report the findings of their work, free from political interference. They should only need worry about the critiques of their peers, which in the end leads to better scientists. Peer review and not political review must be the standard.

The cuts announced affect far more than I could possibly say in 10 minutes. The Conservative members of the industry, science and technology committee have a much better understanding of just how much I have to say on this issue.

It really is a shame that this morning's meeting was also cancelled and that industry ministry officials were not available to discuss the estimates so that we could learn more about these reckless cuts. We are still looking forward to seeing them and, we hope, the minister before the summer recess.

The first issue I want to raise is about good government. One might ask why. It is pretty simple. To provide good government, one needs to assemble a tremendous amount of facts, primarily obtained through large quantities of research from places like Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Library and Archives Canada, National Research Council, Statistics Canada, and of course the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

I forgot to request to have my time split with the member for Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel, so I would like to do that now.

Limiting research at all levels of government and all agencies of government restricts everyone's ability to make fact- and evidence-based policy. This is a critical issue because I cannot possibly see how limiting that information would be a good thing. Yet here we are, debating a motion being brought forward by our science and technology critic and our industry critic.

The seconding by the member for LaSalle—Émard is significant because these cuts also largely touch industry. Cuts to Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, and the National Research Council affect our ability to monitor industry to ensure adherence to environmental regulations that are there to protect us, the air we breathe and the water we drink. As an aside, I will definitely be taking a pass on drinking tailing pond water. There is absolutely no way, but the Minister of Natural Resources can do as he likes.

Cuts to research and science affect our ability as parliamentarians to make the best policies to foster innovation and economic growth. I am proud to stand as deputy industry critic with our industry critic, our science and tech critics, and all NDP members of this House to say that cuts need to be reversed for the long-term benefits of Canadians. The government needs to knock it off.

A lot of research is done independently and in conjunction with industry that has a great impact on our economy, and that will only grow with time. Cuts to Statistics Canada from the policy-making side and the National Research Council from the innovation side will only hinder our long-term development. The time to invest and not pull back is now.

I would like to address two of the looming cuts in wildly different areas that are of particular concern to me.

The closing of the Experimental Lakes Area, as we have already heard today, is particularly troubling because of its international importance and its repeated successes that have only proven its worth.

I would like to cite from an article in the June 1 Globe and Mail about its pending closure:

Former top researchers at the centre say the decision is emblematic of the government’s anti-science approach to environmental policy and its emphasis on resource development with little regard for impacts on the ecosystem unless they affect commercially important fish stocks.

“I think they are uninterested in the environment and scientific research into the environment,” said John Rudd, who served as chief scientist at ELA and now consults for private labs. “They don’t want to see things that might get in the way of promoting industry.”

Now a senior scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in the United States, Dr. Gilmour, said:

By shutting ELA you remove a critical tool for finding the most reasonable and cost-effective solutions to national and international environmental issues.

She also wrote:

The small federal investment in the research station has been returned thousands of times over in public and ecosystem health.

Frankly, the further we go on, the more I start to believe the government's motto is, “Never let a good policy get in the way of bad decision making”.

On a similar note, we have the RADARSAT Constellation mission, where a committed minister and a committed parliamentary secretary say they are on board, but the money is just not in the budget.

This vital Canadian satellite program, with the multi-mission of environmental monitoring, Arctic sovereignty, ocean safety and ice monitoring, and disaster management, as well as the ability to attract other governments and agencies as clients, all makes good business sense and science and safety sense, yet the government has put the program in jeopardy.

What is worse, the government is, unlike what the former member said, precipitating a brain drain from a company that is of such strategic importance to Canada that the government blocked the sale of MacDonald Dettwiler.

Delays in this project could also put Canadian lives at risk. If the Constellation satellites are not in space before RADARSAT-2's end of mission, we could have a coverage gap, and that would put Canadians' lives at risk. It is critical that the situation not be allowed to occur or to continue. The government needs to get off the mat.

These and many other reasons are why we are calling upon all parliamentarians to support and adequately fund these agencies and programs because the return is better government through a fact-based evidence policy, a better and stronger economy that has fewer negative impacts on the environment, through science and innovation dependent from and in conjunction with industry. It is as simple as that.

The cuts just go on and on in this budget, as we mentioned, with several different agencies. The cuts that are happening at Environment Canada and ozone monitoring and with the Arctic monitoring stations, they just have absolutely no basis to be there. These are the programs that keep us safe. They are the programs that keep our air clean. They are the programs that keep our water drinkable. They need to be given the appropriate amount of funds in order to continue to keep us safe. As well of course, on the innovation side, which is very important to me, we certainly need to do a lot more in order to foster innovation and productivity, not a lot less, which is what the government proposes.

There are also disturbing reports that hundreds of small and medium-sized enterprises have disappeared from Canada in the last several years. Of course, these are companies that, by and large, are more productive. They contribute more heft to the Canadian economy than their sizes would indicate. Yet they are disappearing because there is a lack of investment, there is a lack of opportunities, they are being gobbled up by larger enterprises or the unbalanced approach that the government has taken to the economy has put them out of business.

I could, of course, go on for another 20 or 30 minutes, or maybe a couple of hours, as I may or may not do in committee before long, but I will leave it at that. I look forward to hearing what the member for Argenteuil—Papineau—Mirabel has to say.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

Liberal

Ted Hsu Liberal Kingston and the Islands, ON

Mr. Speaker, could the hon. member tell my why the Conservatives have decided to eliminate the National Council of Welfare? This organization gives advice to the federal government on how to best improve the living conditions of low-income Canadians. In addition, it only costs about $1 million, which is 10% of what the Conservatives are planning to spend on advertising in their budget.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:50 p.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member for his question, since it is definitely a topic that I did not have time to address.

I personally do not see why they think it makes sense to cut the program, given that the research conducted by the council helps parliamentarians make better legislation, creating more opportunities for the poorest people in the country.

In my view, the only reason that explains why the Conservatives want to eliminate the National Council of Welfare is that they are afraid of what information we might find.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Dubé NDP Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am aware that the hon. member is very knowledgeable on this matter, as the former science and technology critic and current industry critic.

It is interesting that, on the one hand, we are talking about reducing the number of scientists, muzzling them and preventing them from speaking, and, on the other hand, we often hear arguments about how much it costs the public to keep these “bureaucrats”. In reality, these scientists provide us with data that can help us create good laws and govern properly, which will reduce the costs of environmental damage in the long term.

Keeping these scientists on the job will permit us to introduce legislation to ensure that the next generation can count on a healthy environment with all the benefits that go with it. Could the hon. member expand on that?

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hon. member for his question.

Most certainly, the challenge is even greater for young people, who will have to work until age 67 because of the changes, meaning two years more than previously, or perhaps more, because they will first have to wait for new job opportunities.

Specifically, changes are currently being made to the economy and we need an educated labour force. But education itself is far too expensive. In addition, the job opportunities need to be there once they complete their studies.

Cuts to innovation, science and technology will harm the industry and young people, who will not be able to find jobs and will not be able to help improve the world. We do not know what the scientists of the future are going to discover. The fact is that we must give them the opportunity to do so.

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Anne-Marie Day NDP Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, what impact does the hon. member think the Conservatives' research and development policy will have on our country's future?

Opposition Motion—Scientific and Social Science ExpertiseBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

1:55 p.m.

NDP

Dan Harris NDP Scarborough Southwest, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' research and development policy will be detrimental in a number of ways. If there are fewer opportunities, fewer people will pursue a career in science and technology, thereby limiting innovation and invention. We need to lend our support to a large number of scientists to ensure that discoveries are made in health, the environment and industry.

The oil sands are problematic. A lot of work in science and research still needs to be done in that area, so that the oil sands will not harm the environment, as they currently do.

“MP for a Day” CompetitionStatements by Members

1:55 p.m.

Bloc

André Bellavance Bloc Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the sixth winner of the “MP for a Day” competition, Samuel Daigle, experienced a memorable day on Parliament Hill last week. The student at the Cégep de Victoriaville attended the Bloc Québécois caucus, met the Minister of Foreign Affairs and members of Parliament from the other parties, and participated in an interview on CPAC, among other things.

This competition, organized with the political science and geography teacher, Jean-François Léonard, helps demystify the job of a politician, gives a behind-the-scenes look and helps the student become more familiar with our democratic mechanisms.

I would like to thank my colleagues and everyone else who took time to explain their jobs to Samuel and who welcomed him warmly. Although he maintains a necessary critical eye, I think he now has a much different perspective of the job we do.

I would also like to thank the partners who make this competition possible: Équipe Sévégny-Baril from Via Capitale, the UPA Centre-du-Québec and the Association générale des étudiants et étudiantes du cégep de Victoriaville.

Erin DoyleStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod Conservative Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, BC

Mr. Speaker, on May 25, the community of Kamloops held a commemoration service for Master Corporal Erin Doyle. His name was added to the cenotaph in Kamloops, joining those who died in the cause of freedom.

Master Corporal Doyle served our nation and the Afghan people with distinction over the course of three tours of duty. It was with great sadness that we learned in 2008 that he was killed in action during a Taliban attack.

Beyond his role as a soldier, we also remember him as an irreplaceable man who was loved and cherished. He was truly our “local boy done good”, starting his career as a reservist in our Rocky Mountain Rangers.

In his military career, he not only worked to safeguard Canadian communities, but to assist people halfway around the world in rebuilding theirs. This was a role he willingly took on in the hope of making a difference, and he paid the ultimate price.

On behalf of the Government of Canada, we salute the life and legacy of Master Corporal Erin Doyle.

Festivals in Vaudreuil-SoulangesStatements by Members

June 5th, 2012 / 2 p.m.

NDP

Jamie Nicholls NDP Vaudreuil—Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to invite all Canadians and Quebeckers to take on the pleasant task of supporting the local tourism industry this summer. More specifically, I would like to draw the attention of my colleagues to what is happening in my riding.

On June 10, I invite my colleagues to take part in the very first S.O.U.P.E. festival, a free festival that provides an opportunity to bring generations and cultures together. From June 22 to 25, there is the Vaudreuil-Dorion circus festival, the first international circus competition of its kind in Canada. What is more, it is a carbon-neutral event.

Then there is the Hudson Music Festival, which will be held from July 31 to August 5.

Finally, the 28th Maison Trestler summer festival will hold concerts all summer long.

This summer, let us support the events in our regions. Let us travel at home.

Citizenship ActStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Devinder Shory Conservative Calgary Northeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I recently introduced Bill C-425, an act to amend the Citizenship Act (honouring the Canadian armed forces).

First, it outlines another pathway to integration for permanent residents. Second, it underscores the incredible worth of Canadian citizenship. Third, it honours the contribution of our brave men and women in uniform.

According to the bill, permanent residents who sign a three year contract with the Canadian armed forces would receive a one year credit toward citizenship. Additionally, a Canadian who commits an act of war against the Canadian armed forces would be deemed to have renounced his or her Canadian citizenship.

To serve Canada in our military is a patriotic act of service worthy of reward. Conversely, to commit an act of war against Canada's armed forces signals a clear rejection of Canadian responsibilities, values and citizenship.

In the coming months, I ask for support from all sides of this House for the bill.

World OceansStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Joyce Murray Liberal Vancouver Quadra, BC

Mr. Speaker, with every breath we take, every drop of water we drink, human beings are connected to the ocean. They are our life support system, give us more than half the oxygen we breathe, regulate our climate, provide invaluable resources and are an endless source of magic and mystery for the human spirit.

Eighty percent of the world's population lives within 100 kilometres of an ocean and three and a half billion people depend on the oceans for food. Yet, scientists estimate that up to one-third of commercial fisheries are overfished, climate change is making oceans warmer and more acidic, and a mere half a percent of global marine habitats are protected. We have work to do.

June 8 is World Oceans Day, a great opportunity to celebrate oceans, but our aim must be to protect them as a way of life. That is why this year's theme, “Youth: The Next Wave for Change”, is so critical. We welcome young people's creativity and innovative ideas so that we can truly sustain oceans as they sustain us.

D-DayStatements by Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Gary Schellenberger Conservative Perth—Wellington, ON

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, June 6, will mark the 68th anniversary of D-Day when nearly 25,000 Canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen stormed Juno Beach in Normandy and helped to turn the tide of the Second World War.

Our troops would pay a brutal cost to begin the liberation of Europe, with 5,400 Canadian graves in Normandy, the highest in the British army group.

I am very proud to have several D-Day veterans in my riding of Perth—Wellington, men like Chief Warrant Officer Art Boon and Battery Sergeant Major Stuart Jeffra who landed with the 19th Field Regiment, as well as Chief Warrant Officer Bill Broughton and Corporal Ray Huras who landed with the Highland Light Infantry.

Canada has always been a peaceful nation but our warriors have always brought an equal measure of determination and courage to battle when peace or freedom is at stake.

I know hon. members will join with all Canadians in recognizing our D-Day veterans.

World Environment DayStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe NDP Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, on this World Environment Day, I would like to congratulate all those who are taking real action to protect the environment.

This year, supported by their devoted principal and teachers, about 30 students participated in the CFER program at Riverdale High School.

Thanks to their skills, to the stockrooms and machines in their school, as well as to the good co-operation they maintain with different companies, these students recycle televisions and computer systems. With the Caravan project, they also visit elementary schools to raise awareness about the environment and recycling.

They can be proud of the important work they do for our community.

Other initiatives also deserve to be recognized, including: the Pierrefonds-Roxboro Éco-quartier, which demonstrates leadership in waste management and in the cleanliness and beautification of our community; the Ferme Bord-du-Lac, which provides local, organic produce to people from the region; and the City of Dollard-des-Ormeaux, which offers an organic waste collection service.

There is still much to be done but, in my riding, we are taking real action for the environment and we can be proud of that.

George AbdallahStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Conservative Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is with a touch of personal sadness that I rise today to remember prominent Pembroke citizen, George Abdallah, who passed away this week.

George was a public man, in business, politics and community service.

“Trader George” joined his father in business in the early fifties, running a furniture and appliance business in Pembroke “at the block at the bridge”.

A member of the Pembroke City Council from 1963 to 1972 and then mayor from 1972 to 1974, George impressed upon me the importance of every single voter as he missed being returned to office as mayor by less than a handful of votes. I valued his counsel.

Always active in politics, he was my driver in the last two federal elections.

George went on to serve over 20 years on the local hydro commission.

George was very active in charitable activities, as a one-time member of the Kiwanis, the Masonic Lodge and the Shriners. As a member of the Ottawa Valley Shrine Club, George could be seen on its float every Santa Claus parade.

On behalf of the community, I ask his wife of 57 years, Joan, and his children, Kathryn, Sandra and Brian, to please accept our appreciation of George of a life well-lived.

ALS Awareness MonthStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

David Tilson Conservative Dufferin—Caledon, ON

Mr. Speaker, June is ALS Awareness Month.

ALS, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a rapidly progressive fatal motor neuron disease that affects approximately 3,000 Canadians.

My father succumbed to ALS a number of years ago and, as a result of my very personal encounter with this devastating disease, I reintroduced my private member's bill last year to have June officially designated as national ALS month.

I commend the ALS Society of Canada for its tireless work in increasing awareness among Canadians, in funding research to find a cure and in providing quality care for those affected.

I encourage each member to wear a cornflower today to show their support in the fight against ALS. I also invite all hon. members to attend this evening's ALS reception in the parliamentary restaurant to learn more.

Together we can find a cure.

Foreign AffairsStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to salute the staff of Rights & Democracy, a great Canadian organization that will, unfortunately, be closing its doors in July.

Rights & Democracy was created in 1988 by an act of Parliament that received unanimous approval. Its mandate was to promote respect for human rights and the development of democracy abroad. It was doing exceptional work in many places, including some of the most dangerous areas of the world.

The organization is being abolished, but as Jean-Louis Roy, former president of Rights & Democracy, told me recently, the organization is not dying. It will live on through all those it has helped throughout the world.

I will be hosting a non-partisan reception for the staff of Rights & Democracy on the Hill on June 14. I invite all my fellow MPs to attend this reception and to join me in thanking the employees of Rights & Democracy for their service.

Budget ImplementationStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière, QC

Mr. Speaker, our government has an excellent track record when it comes to job creation and economic growth. Over 750,000 jobs have been created since 2009. Our most recent budget is the next phase of our plan for job creation and long-term prosperity in Canada.

Given that the global economic recovery remains fragile, particularly in Europe, Canadians want the government to focus on what matters most. That is exactly what our government is doing through the implementation of our economic action plan.

This is the longest debate that any budget bill has had in the House and in committee in nearly two decades. It is high time that the NDP made the economy a priority instead of playing partisan procedural games.

Why do the leader of the NDP and his party always side with the interests of radical activists rather than the interests of honest, hard-working Canadians?

HealthStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer NDP Sackville—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Mr. Wayne Hanley, national president of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Canada; Mr. Mark Dobson, regional director for Atlantic Canada; and Mr. Tim Hosford, as well as all members of the UFCW across the country.

Last year, they had another record-breaking fundraising year for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, raising over $2 million. To date, UFCW Canada has raised over $23 million for leukemia and lymphoma research in Canada, making UFCW Canada the number one donator to this very important cause.

On behalf of the House of Commons on both sides, we congratulate UFCW Canada and all its membership for their fantastic work, one day hoping to find a cure for that terrible scourge of leukemia and lymphoma disease in this country. We congratulate UFCW Canada and thank its members for their continued efforts in this regard.