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House of Commons Hansard #214 of the 41st Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was municipalities.

Topics

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian NDP Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

Mr. Speaker, this is the 21st century and companies have regulatory obligations and social responsibilities. These responsibilities also apply to the Northern Gateway and Keystone pipeline projects. Yet, rather than establishing clear and specific regulations, the Conservatives have chosen inaction and improvisation.

When will the government show that it is serious about protecting our commercial and environmental interests and the health of Canadians? When will it present clear regulations for the sustainable development of natural resources?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, he knows full well that the Northern Gateway is being reviewed at this point, but I would like to point out a little bit about the NDP.

The NDP is opposed to all oil and gas development projects. It is opposed to mining projects, clean energy projects and nuclear energy. The NDP even speaks out against the forestry industry.

Is there one sector in natural resources the NDP actually supports?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian NDP Burnaby—New Westminster, BC

We support environmentally and economically sustainable development, Mr. Speaker.

These guys have been warned. They have been warned by the environment commissioner that failing to make sure that environmental protection keeps pace with resource extraction will endanger Canada's economy. They have been warned by the American ambassador, who hinted at the huge political and economic cost of continued climate inaction, and they have been warned by Canadians from coast to coast to coast, who are standing up against Conservative attacks on environmental protection.

When will the minister get the message to stop making it up as he goes along and to start protecting our environment and our economy?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Cypress Hills—Grasslands Saskatchewan

Conservative

David Anderson ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources and for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, when is the NDP going to join with us in trying to create good, skilled, well-paying jobs in communities across Canada? We want to do that while maintaining science-based environmental reviews. We have made that clear.

Our economic action plan has made Canada a leader in a troubled global economy. The NDP has opposed that at every turn. We have the lowest debt burden by far. We have the strongest job creation in the G7, with over 920,000 new jobs created since July 2009. Why does the NDP oppose all of that?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

John Weston Conservative West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, BC

Mr. Speaker, our government is focused on what matters to Canadians: jobs, growth and long-term prosperity. That is why our government made the strategic and historic decision to support the Canadian marine industry, to revitalize Canadian shipyards and to build ships for the Navy and Coast Guard right here in Canada.

It has been estimated the national shipbuilding procurement strategy will contribute 15,000 jobs from coast to coast to coast and over $2 billion in annual economic benefits over the next 30 years. Can the minister provide the House an update on this key job-creating strategy?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for his support for the Vancouver Shipyards workers.

Our government is very proud of our historic decision to build our ships for our navy and Coast Guard right here in Canada, in Halifax and Vancouver. Great progress is being made. Both shipyards are investing hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade their yards. This Friday, I announced a series of contracts for our joint support ships, our polar icebreaker and our offshore fishery science vessels with the workers at Vancouver Shipyards.

The national shipbuilding strategy means stability for the industry. It means good jobs and vital equipment for the navy and Coast Guard.

National DefenceOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

John McCallum Liberal Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, two weeks ago I asked the same question, twice, about shipbuilding costs, and each time I got the same non-answer from the minister, so I will give it another try.

Does she accept the 7% to 11% industry estimate of military shipbuilding inflation? If so, what is it going to be? Will she increase her shipbuilding budget by $14 billion, or will she build 10 large combat ships instead of 15? It is a very simple question, and it deserves a serious answer.

National DefenceOral Questions

3 p.m.

Edmonton—Spruce Grove Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeMinister of Public Works and Government Services and Minister for Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, we have allocated $33 billion for the procurement of new ships that will be built in Halifax and Vancouver. The member also knows that those cost estimates come from military planners. In fact, I believe that the member posed that question to those very experts on this issue at committee, and he was satisfied at that time with their answer.

However, I will reiterate that those cost estimates do come from military planners. They involve the oversight of auditors and cost estimators at the Department of National Defence and, of course, oversight by Treasury Board Secretariat.

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

February 26th, 2013 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Dubé NDP Chambly—Borduas, QC

Mr. Speaker, on February 8, when I asked a question about the government's chronic undervaluation of historic sites, I was told that I would be given an answer in a week. It has now been two weeks.

I would like to remind hon. members that, on June 15, 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in favour of the City of Halifax. The government has to compensate the municipalities for the loss of tax revenue. With regard to Fort Chambly in my riding, this problem is depriving the city of half a million dollars a year.

When will the government comply with this ruling and how is it going to do so?

Public Works and Government ServicesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Oak Ridges—Markham Ontario

Conservative

Paul Calandra ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, of course, we are reviewing that, but as the hon. member knows, we have made significant investments in arts and culture across the country and have been working very hard with the Minister of the Environment to make sure our national historic sites are preserved. Through all of our economic action plan, we have made sure that historic sites, arts and culture lead to positive outcomes for Canadians. We know that it creates jobs and economic opportunity across the country. Unfortunately, the NDP has always voted against that.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Erin O'Toole Conservative Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, our government knows that veterans' mental health can be either a gateway or a barrier to transitioning back to civilian life. Those Canadians who have served our country and are dealing with mental health issues need our support if those issues arise as a result of their service.

Could the Minister of Veterans Affairs please inform the House about a new tool that will soon be available to help our veterans?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

3 p.m.

Lévis—Bellechasse Québec

Conservative

Steven Blaney ConservativeMinister of Veterans Affairs and Minister for La Francophonie

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Durham for the great question. He is a man who is serving in the House and who has proudly served in our Canadian armed forces.

Yesterday I was pleased to announce a new tool that is being piloted with veterans to help identify and treat post-traumatic stress disorder. This new self-assessment tool builds on our partnership with the University of British Columbia. It is a soldier-to-soldier, veteran-to-veteran approach. It is happening here, now, in Ottawa.

PTSD Coach Canada is one more step forward in our veterans transition action plan that continues to deliver concrete results for our great Canadian veterans.

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Dennis Bevington NDP Western Arctic, NT

Mr. Speaker, Statistics Canada's latest report shows that consumer costs in the north have risen twice as fast as elsewhere in the country. The report shows that the major factor increasing the price of food is the Conservative's own nutrition north program. This flawed program has stuck northerners with overpriced, over-packaged, poor-quality food. Clearly, the government has to take action to reduce the high cost of living in the north.

The NDP has long called for a 50% increase to the northern residence tax deduction. Will the government include such a measure in its upcoming budget?

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

Madawaska—Restigouche New Brunswick

Conservative

Bernard Valcourt ConservativeMinister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, the fact of the matter is that there is no government in the history of this country—

TaxationOral Questions

3 p.m.

An hon. member

In the world.

TaxationOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Valcourt Conservative Madawaska—Restigouche, NB

Yes, in the whole world, that has done as much for northern Canadians.

Let us just look at the example of the northern jobs and growth act, which is geared especially to trying to improve the situation of people living in northern Canada. Instead of opposing that legislation, the opposition should support us.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, recently tabled numbers put before this House by Environment Canada make it clear that by 2020, Canada will totally miss the Copenhagen target adopted by the Prime Minister. It will not even be close.

Here are the numbers: 17% below 2005 levels by 2020 is 126 megatons. Environment Canada is now projecting that it will have achieved only 20 megatons, which, amazingly, is more than current emissions.

Will the government accept that the so-called sector-by-sector, piecemeal, smoke-and-mirrors approach is not working and that we need real climate action?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Calgary Southwest Alberta

Conservative

Stephen Harper ConservativePrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, of course, this is the first government in Canadian history to actually reduce emissions of greenhouse gas.

The Minister of the Environment, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities and my colleagues have taken a number of important actions, including the announcement on truck harmonization standards, just recently. We will continue to look at ways to move forward on this important file.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

I would like to draw the attention of hon. members to the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Elaine Taylor, Deputy Premier, Minister of Community Services and Minister Responsible for the Public Service Commission, the Women's Directorate, and the French Language Services Directorate for the Yukon.

Presence in GalleryOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear!

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Scott Brison Liberal Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, during question period, the President of the Treasury Board overstated the advertising spending of the last Liberal government during its last year in office by 125%. He has done that repeatedly. In fact, it was—

Oral QuestionsPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

Order, please. All I heard there was a continuation of debate. Perhaps the hon. member can wait until a future question period to make that point, but question period is over for today.

The House resumed consideration of the motion.

Opposition Motion—Federal Infrastructure PlanBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

3:05 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel ConservativeMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with the member for Lotbinière—Chutes-de-la-Chaudière.

I would like to take this opportunity to highlight our Conservative government's unprecedented support for infrastructure initiatives across the country. No federal government in Canadian history has invested as much in infrastructure as we have. The provinces, territories and municipalities have never had a better partner than our government.

The same cannot be said of the opposition. For seven years, the NDP have voted on ideology alone. They have voted against all of our government's measures to support our partners. I would like to remind the House that it was our government that, despite the NDP's opposition, implemented the first long-term infrastructure plan in 2007. The building Canada fund has an envelope of $33 billion over seven years. Our government also—

Opposition Motion—Federal Infrastructure PlanBusiness of SupplyGovernment Orders

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!