House of Commons Hansard #182 of the 41st Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pipelines.

Topics

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Françoise Boivin NDP Gatineau, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians and many experts are increasingly concerned about Bill C-51.

Now we can add to that long list Canada's Privacy Commissioner, Daniel Therrien, who said he is very concerned about the repercussions of Bill C-51 on people's privacy and the protection of their personal information. He is calling for better oversight mechanisms for intelligence agencies.

Will the minister listen to the commissioner and will he be open to amendments?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Scarborough Centre Ontario

Conservative

Roxanne James ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, information sharing is absolutely essential. Canadians would expect that if one branch of government had information pertinent to national security, it would be able to share the information with other branches of government.

When we talk about activities that would warrant information sharing, I am just going to list a few: espionage, sabotage, covert foreign influence activities and terrorism.

The legislation, Bill C-51, which is coming to committee tomorrow, has adequate safeguards built in to protect the privacy of Canadians. We are not going to privilege the rights of terrorists over the rights of Canadians with this bill.

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison NDP Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, first it was former prime ministers and former Supreme Court justices. Now the Privacy Commissioner and even the Canadian premiers have weighed in on the risks of adopting Bill C-51. Even the B.C. Premier says that Bill C-51 could impinge on the fundamental rights enjoyed by Canadians, and that if we give away our freedoms, “We will regret that forever...it's very hard to get them back”.

Experts and Canadians all across the country have recognized that this bill is fatally flawed. Why is the minister refusing to listen to them?

Public SafetyOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Scarborough Centre Ontario

Conservative

Roxanne James ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, again, Canadians would expect, if they do not already think, that when one branch of government has information pertinent to national security, it will be able to and is currently sharing that information. That is simply not the case. It is one of the gaps that was identified. It is one of the measures that is included in Bill C-51.

Let us talk about some other activities that warrant information sharing. They include proliferation of nuclear, chemical, radiological or biological weapons; interference with critical infrastructure; and interference with global information infrastructure as defined in the National Defence Act.

This legislation already has adequate safeguards built in to protect Canadians' privacy. It is why we brought forward the measures that Canadians expected.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Stella Ambler Conservative Mississauga South, ON

Mr. Speaker, for several years, our men and women in uniform have been taking part in a multinational campaign against trafficking and organized crime in the Caribbean Sea.

Can the Minister of National Defence update the House on the status of our operations in the Caribbean Sea to prevent illegal drugs from coming to our shores?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Calgary Southeast Alberta

Conservative

Jason Kenney ConservativeMinister of National Defence and Minister for Multiculturalism

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform members that this month, Her Majesty's Canadian Ships Goose Bay and Shawinigan seized over 1,000 kilograms of cocaine in a major drug bust in the Caribbean Sea. These dangerous narcotics would have otherwise landed on our streets and in our communities.

We are proud of our Canadian Armed Forces members who worked with the United States Coast Guard and U.S. Navy in this successful disruption. We will continue to work with our allies to fight transnational criminal activity and keep Canadian communities safe.

AgricultureOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies NDP Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, when the latest case of BSE was discovered, the Minister of Agriculture said he did not think it would interfere with trade, but here we are, a month later, and the list of countries that have banned Canadian beef is growing.

Last week, China closed its borders. Including South Korea and Taiwan, that makes six important markets that have now banned beef exports.

With every week that passes, these restrictions cost our farmers and our economy. Why have the Conservatives failed to protect our beef exports, and what are they doing to restore them?

AgricultureOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture

Mr. Speaker, our government continues to proactively engage with our trading partners to ensure that our markets stay open, and to reopen markets to Canadian beef as quickly as possible.

With regard to the countries that have imposed temporary restrictions, these markets, while important, represent a small percentage of our overall beef trade. Meanwhile, the World Organisation for Animal Health recognizes Canada as a controlled risk status country. We expect our trading partners to continue to recognize this status.

AgricultureOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Ruth Ellen Brosseau NDP Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, after Belarus, Peru, Taiwan, South Korea and Indonesia, now China is closing its borders to Canadian beef in the wake of the latest case of mad cow in Alberta.

By cutting the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's budget by 20%, the Conservatives jeopardized Canadian beef exports. The Conservatives played fast and loose with our producers' livelihood, and that is completely irresponsible.

When will the Conservatives take action to protect our Canadian producers and avoid a new crisis?

AgricultureOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

South Shore—St. Margaret's Nova Scotia

Conservative

Gerald Keddy ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture

Mr. Speaker, as I said, the World Organisation for Animal Health recognizes Canada as a controlled risk status country. We expect our trading partners to continue to recognize this status. Meanwhile, our government will continue to proactively engage our trading partners to ensure that markets stay open and to reopen markets to Canadian beef as quickly as possible.

HealthOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Christine Moore NDP Abitibi—Témiscamingue, QC

Mr. Speaker, on Friday, the Minister of Health suddenly announced financial assistance for thalidomide victims. However, this was done without consulting the victims, who were notified just a few minutes before the minister's press conference, and the announcement was short on details.

Why did the minister not meet with the members of the victims' rights group before making her announcement?

HealthOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo B.C.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and for Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, these events from the 1960s remind us of why we need to take drug safety so seriously.

On Friday, the minister announced historic assistance to cover the health care needs. There is going to be up to $180 million distributed among fewer than 100 survivors, until that last living survivor.

She has been in ongoing conversations with the group. Of course, these will be important payments: a $125-million immediate payment, tax free, and then $168 million, tax free, in ongoing support.

HealthOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Murray Rankin NDP Victoria, BC

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian government has a moral obligation to help thalidomide survivors.

They have paid a lifelong price for the government's belief that thalidomide was safe, but three months after the House unanimously passed a motion calling for full support, the minister announced a package that may or may not meet the needs of the thalidomide survivors.

There was no consultation and very little communication from the minister. Before making the announcement, what did the minister do to ensure that the compensation would meet the needs of the thalidomide survivors?

HealthOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo B.C.

Conservative

Cathy McLeod ConservativeParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health and for Western Economic Diversification

Mr. Speaker, nothing can ever change, and we certainly have deep sympathy and regret for the ongoing struggle thalidomide inflicted.

There have been ongoing conversations since the motion passed in the House, and actually prior to that. In actual fact, the historic announcement the minister made on Friday is for up to $180 million for the fewer than 100 survivors. This support is going to be available for the last living survivor.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Adam Vaughan Liberal Trinity—Spadina, ON

Mr. Speaker, under the former government of former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien, the premier of Ontario and the mayor of Ontario stood on the shores of Lake Ontario and committed to transform the waterfront of our great city.

It is time for the next investment. The province is ready. The city has set aside its money. But where is the federal government? Three hundred and twenty-five million dollars is needed, and much like the budget, the finance minister is hiding under his desk and will not come forward.

Will the finance minister please commit this money, fund the flood proofing that is needed in the Lower Don Lands, fund the transit, and get the Unilever site off to the races? Will the federal government please commit to the city of Toronto and the province—

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

The Speaker Conservative Andrew Scheer

The hon. Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and Intergovernmental Affairs.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel ConservativeMinister of Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, we always work with our partners. We respect the jurisdiction of provinces and municipalities. We do not manage the cities here in Ottawa. We respect the fact that there are city councils and mayors doing their jobs, and we will continue to do so. The Minister of Finance is doing his job.

CBC/Radio-CanadaOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Stéphane Dion Liberal Saint-Laurent—Cartierville, QC

Mr. Speaker, a quote:

We have said that we will maintain or increase support for the CBC. That is our platform and we have said that before and we will commit to that.

Who said that in Vancouver on CBC News on May 3, 2011? It was the former heritage minister, now the Minister of Industry.

Why did the Conservative government's budget 2012 take a hatchet to Canada's national broadcaster, slashing $150 million from the CBC budget? Why did it break its promise?

CBC/Radio-CanadaOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Saint Boniface Manitoba

Conservative

Shelly Glover ConservativeMinister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

Mr. Speaker, I find the question somewhat surprising from that member, who used to be a Liberal minister during the nineties when they cut almost $400 million from CBC. Aside from the hypocrisy, we in fact provide over $1 billion a year to the CBC, and we all know that there are some challenges in the media environment right now. The president has indicated that as well. We will continue, as I said before, to monitor the situation, but I am not going to respond to another question from a party that frankly does not deserve to ask a question about cuts.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

March 9th, 2015 / 2:50 p.m.

NDP

François Lapointe NDP Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, from 2010 to 2014, the Economic Development Agency for the Regions of Quebec failed to use $131 million.

While employment is in decline and the retail and manufacturing sectors need help in modernizing, the government has been sitting on money voted by Parliament.

Why is the minister trying to save money at the expense of the economic development of Quebec's regions? Will he at least commit to using all the money voted by Parliament for that purpose this year?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel ConservativeMinister of Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, that is completely false.

It seems awfully difficult to ask the NDP to understand balance sheets and budgets. When amounts are not spent, they are carried forward from one year to the next.

We announced a program over seven years for Lac-Mégantic. I am informing my colleague that he will see some of the money for Lac-Mégantic again next year because it will not all be spent this year. This program is over seven years, over many years. These ad hoc programs in the forestry industry and community infrastructure are multi-year programs.

When the money is not all spent over the course of one year, it is still available the next year. It is as simple as that.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

François Choquette NDP Drummond, QC

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that 99% of the money that goes unspent is returned to the consolidated revenue fund. The minister needs to stop his tall tales.

Instead of diverting $131 million earmarked for the economic development of Quebec, the minister should start listening to the regions. Then we could create some jobs in the regions.

For example, we could improve the facilities at the Drummondville airport, which is in serious need of some federal funding.

Does the minister realize that his incompetence is compromising the economic development of Quebec's regions?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Roberval—Lac-Saint-Jean Québec

Conservative

Denis Lebel ConservativeMinister of Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, that is absolutely false and ridiculous. After more than four years here, the member should know how things work.

As a matter of fact, I was back in Drummondville, the member's riding, last week to promote economic development because the local member does not appear to be doing his job. Members on this side are continuing to do their jobs.

What those people are saying is untrue. It is easy to understand. Everyone knows that the money is not spent all at once. It depends on how proponents progress with projects. If a project is not completed over the course of a year, the money is carried over to the following year and remains available. It is not hard to understand.

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

John Carmichael Conservative Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, under our government, trade, investment, and tourism between Canada and China has been growing to the benefit of Canadian families and workers. Could the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration please tell us more about the exciting announcement made this weekend that will make it easier for Canadians to travel to China?

Citizenship and ImmigrationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Ajax—Pickering Ontario

Conservative

Chris Alexander ConservativeMinister of Citizenship and Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the hard-working member for Don Valley West for his question and for his work on this issue. Yesterday I was very pleased, together with my colleague, the Minister of International Trade, to announce that Canada has reached an arrangement with the Chinese government whereby Canadians will have the opportunity to apply for 10-year multiple-entry visas to go to China.

Today Chinese business people and family members who travel often to China have to apply for a new visa every time they go, whether that is twice a year, twice a month, or every few days. Under this new arrangement, they will make one application and get a visa for 10 years. That is great for our business relations, it is great for families, and it is great for Canada-China relations.