House of Commons Hansard #107 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was families.

Topics

Sikh CommunityStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound.

Veterans WeekStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Larry Miller Conservative Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to honour veterans across this country and remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

During Veterans Week, I met and talked to dozens of veterans. Whether it was over breakfast at the Hanover Legion, or after Remembrance Day services in Tara, Chatsworth, and Owen Sound, it was an honour to personally thank veterans of Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound.

I spoke with 101-year-old veteran Art Haley, who was recognized as Ontario senior of the year, and 92-year-old Ken Reimer, who celebrated 70 years with the Chatsworth Legion.

We must make no mistake. Canadians would not enjoy our free and democratic way of life without the sacrifices of these Canadian heroes. Veterans are veterans 365 days a year, not just on Remembrance Day.

I urge all members of the House and every Canadian citizen, if they see a veteran, to shake their hand, thank them for their service, and never forget their sacrifice.

To all veterans, we thank them.

New Circles Community ServicesStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Yasmin Ratansi Liberal Don Valley East, ON

Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize the work of New Circles community service, a not-for-profit organization in my riding of Don Valley East.

New Circles operates the largest clothing bank in Toronto, GLOW, gently loved outfits to wear. GLOW donates contemporary used clothing to those in need, including Syrian refugees, in a retail setting where they can pick outfits for themselves and their families. It also trains youth in retail marketing.

In addition, New Circles has a mobile mall, which travels to six Toronto community housing seniors residences, enabling them to shop at their leisure.

I applaud New Circles for the generosity of the organization and the positive impacts it has had on so many people.

Worthy Devotion DayStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Anthony Rota Liberal Nipissing—Timiskaming, ON

Mr. Speaker, Abbey Thompson founded Worthy Devotion 2015 as part of her senior year project at Chippewa Secondary School in North Bay, Ontario. She wanted to do something that would have a lasting impact even after she graduated.

Ultimately, the goal of the program is to give students in grades seven to ten at Chippewa secondary school the necessary tools to build healthy self-esteem.

Local businesses have given students the opportunity to attend workshops that promote physical activity and healthy eating, and that teach self-defence.

I would like to thank Abbey, who is now a first year student at Nipissing University, for helping to build strong young women and thank her for her continued dedication in organizing Worthy Devotion Day.

Violence Against WomenStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to rise today to highlight wear purple day in support of the London Abused Women's Centre's Shine the Light on Women's Abuse campaign.

Today we wear purple to raise awareness of violence against women and girls, and to stand in solidarity with abused women and support them in understanding that any shame or blame they may feel does not belong to them but belongs to the perpetrators of their abuse.

During the month of November, cities, regions, and counties across Canada are lit up purple to show support, and here in Ottawa I am honoured to advise that tonight the Peace Tower will be illuminated in purple, beginning at 7:10 p.m.

I invite all members, senators, and staff to attend the reception to Shine the Light on Women's Abuse tonight from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

I thank Megan Walker and her team from the London Abused Women's Centre and centres from across Canada for their incredible work.

I hope to see everyone there as we shine a light on women's abuse.

Violence Against WomenStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Lloyd Longfield Liberal Guelph, ON

Mr. Speaker, the month of November is Woman Abuse Prevention Month. This month, from community groups to the House of Commons, Canadians will come together to fight gender-based violence. In my own riding of Guelph, groups like Women in Crisis offer support and raise awareness of abused women.

This past November 3, members from Burlington, Sarnia—Lambton, and Nanaimo—Ladysmith hosted Hope in High Heels on Parliament Hill. With both my male and female colleagues, I was honoured to kick off my shoes and don pink high heels to march for the rights of women.

To the organizers and my fellow participating MPs, I extend my most sincere thanks.

It is important to keep in mind a quote from Guelph's Women in Crisis Centre, “You don't have to be hit to be hurt”.

Louis RielStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dan Vandal Liberal Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, MB

Mr. Speaker, on this historic day, I would like to pay tribute to Louis Riel.

Today, the Government of Canada and the Manitoba Metis Federation signed a historic framework agreement setting the path toward reconciliation.

Tomorrow, Manitoba's Métis community will gather at the tomb of Louis Riel, in the cemetery of St. Boniface Cathedral, to commemorate the 131st anniversary of his death.

We have long recognized the important role that Riel played in creating our country. He is the Father of Manitoba, and his photograph now hangs alongside those of the premiers of Manitoba in the legislature.

Louis Riel is highly regarded as the father of Manitoba and is widely respected for his ability to build consensus among those around him. Tomorrow, I will join the Manitoba Metis Federation, l'Union nationale métisse, and the community to honour our Métis leader, a great Canadian, Louis Riel.

Pancreatic CancerStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Conservative Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadians' awareness of pancreatic cancer is unfortunately exceptionally low compared to other cancers, despite it being the most deadly form. November is national awareness month for this disease, and Pancreatic Cancer Canada has initiated a purple lights program to encourage landmarks across Canada to shine a purple light to raise awareness.

Pancreatic Cancer Canada is asking us to help literally shed light on this terrible disease and its presence in the life of Canadians.

I encourage all members of the House to reach out to their community leaders and request that a local landmark be turned purple. They can also request that the city or municipality declare November as national awareness month, or November 17 as world pancreatic cancer day.

Pancreatic cancer knows no bounds. It can strike anybody, at any time. It is estimated that 5,200 Canadians will be diagnosed with this disease this year alone.

I encourage all my fellow members to wear purple this November 17 to shed light on pancreatic cancer and to help educate Canadians about this deadly disease.

Violence Against WomenStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Kate Young Liberal London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, this November marks the seventh year of the Shine the Light on Woman Abuse campaign. Launched by the London Abused Women's Centre, the campaign engages communities across Canada to stand in solidarity with abused women and girls, while supporting them in seeking services, by turning cities and regions purple for the month of November.

Purple is a symbol of courage, survival, and honour, and it has come to symbolize the fight to end woman abuse. This year, we honour two women: Paula Gallant, a 36-year-old Nova Scotia resident who was murdered by her husband while her baby slept upstairs; and Mary Meadows, a southwestern Ontario woman who survived abuse with the support of the London Abused Women's Centre.

I encourage all my colleagues to join me and representatives from the London Abused Women's Centre for the lighting of the Hill ceremony on the steps of Parliament tonight, after the votes, to shine the light on abuse against women.

Operation Red NoseStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach NDP Salaberry—Suroît, QC

Mr. Speaker, the 26th Operation Red Nose campaign has begun in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. This year, the goal is to provide transportation for 1,000 people.

Between November 25 and December 31, hundreds of volunteers will give rides to drivers who have been drinking while celebrating. Proceeds will go to Fondation Tournesol, an organization that helps families with children who are critically ill or have a major disability.

This year, the honorary chair is Marilyne Picard, co-founder of the Parents jusqu'au bout movement and mother of a four-year-old girl, Dylane, who has had several serious illnesses since birth.

I would also like to point out the new youth component, “Party sans déraper”, organized by Liberté de choisir, a local organization that promotes healthy living and addiction prevention. Let us remember that young people continue to be the primary victims of motor vehicle accidents in Quebec, where young people under the age of 35 account for over one-third of traffic fatalities.

I therefore encourage all those who want to get involved and help to go and meet with the Operation Red Nose volunteers this Saturday, November 19, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 247 Larocque Road in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield.

Let us save lives together.

Natural ResourcesStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

John Barlow Conservative Foothills, AB

Mr. Speaker, as an Albertan it has been incredibly difficult to hear the stories of my friends and neighbours who have been affected by the economic downturn in our province.

Last week I held round tables throughout my Foothills constituency as part of the Alberta jobs task force, and I heard countless stories of job losses, mental health concerns, faltering businesses, and families struggling to make ends meet.

However, the resurrection of Keystone XL has brought renewed hope to thousands of unemployed energy workers in Alberta. The U.S. president-elect supports Keystone XL and I hope our Prime Minister will also make this a top priority and work with the proponents of this pipeline to get it built. Keystone XL would create critical jobs for Canadian workers and offer a new route to get our energy resources to market. We cannot afford to let this opportunity pass us by.

Steelworkers in Saskatchewan and Ontario, welders in Nova Scotia, and engineers in Alberta are counting on the government to show leadership, abandon a job-killing carbon tax, and support a job-creating pipeline.

Get Keystone XL approved.

Anti-SemitismStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

David McGuinty Liberal Ottawa South, ON

Mr. Speaker, we were shocked and horrified to learn of the anti-Semitic incident targeting a local Jewish home in Ottawa just last night. Residents woke to find part of a swastika and anti-Semitic slur spray-painted on their front door. This incident clearly demonstrates that anti-Semitism still exists in Canada and that all of us must be vigilant, speak out, and actively work together to combat it. We simply cannot let this kind of discrimination go unanswered, or worse, seep into the everyday lives of Canadians.

All of us in the House and in our communities must signal that religiously motivated attacks are indeed contrary to Canadian values and principles. I ask all members to stand together, side by side, in condemning, denouncing, and most of all, repudiating this incident and any others like it.

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, today we wear purple to shine the light on violence against women. We stand in solidarity with women subject to violence, and we give them our unconditional support.

When I was health minister, I was pleased to announce a 10-year $100 million investment to prevent, detect, and combat family violence and child abuse, with 30% of that funding going to aboriginal women, who, of course, are the most vulnerable of the victims.

Can the health minister reassure the House that this funding and investment is still ongoing?

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:15 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I think we all stand in solidarity with women who are experiencing violence in their everyday lives. It is heartwarming to see so many people wearing purple today.

I am very excited to be working on a federal gender-based violence strategy that is going to take into account the tremendous work that needs to be done in this country to address this issue. I am very much looking forward to reporting to this House in 2017 how our strategy will unfold.

TaxationOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the new reality Canada faces is simple. The president elect in the United States has promised major personal and business tax cuts. The current Prime Minister has raised income taxes, business taxes, and is implementing a carbon tax. His approach will drive new investment away from Canada to the United States. This means less jobs for Canadians and less growth.

Faced with this new reality, will the Prime Minister cancel his tax hikes so Canada can compete?

TaxationOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Kings—Hants Nova Scotia

Liberal

Scott Brison LiberalPresident of the Treasury Board

Mr. Speaker, we inherited a slow growth economy, and our government has invested in jobs and growth. It is why we reduced taxes for the middle class. It is why we introduced a Canada child benefit, which will raise 300,000 Canadian kids out of poverty. It is why we are investing in infrastructure to build more livable communities, a more competitive economy, and to create jobs and growth.

When the member talks about taxes, why did she vote against a tax cut for the middle class, one that really helps generate economic activity in communities across Canada?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the reality is that it has been a year and the current government has not created one new, additional full-time job.

One year ago, the Prime Minister claimed that he was disappointed with President Obama's decision to reject the Keystone pipeline, but now that the new president elect has expressed his support, will the Prime Minister do the right thing and move quickly to lend his personal and public support to the Keystone XL pipeline?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Winnipeg South Centre Manitoba

Liberal

Jim Carr LiberalMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, the government had indicated its support for Keystone XL, and it also said that it was disappointed when President Obama saw it a different way.

All of the necessary approvals in Canada are in place. They have not timed out. If the company decides that it wants to introduce it once again, the government will, as it was before, be supportive of the application.

InfrastructureOral Questions

November 15th, 2016 / 2:20 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's infrastructure bank should offer his billionaire buddies a return on their investment. This means user fees and tolls. The Prime Minister eliminated the toll from the Champlain Bridge. Is he now saying that he supports tolls?

Who will make these decisions, the Prime Minister, mayors, the provinces, or investment firms?

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we are very proud of the unprecedented investments our government is making. Some $180 billion will be invested over the next 12 years in green infrastructure, social infrastructure, public transit, and transportation corridors to enhance trade.

We also created an infrastructure bank so that investors can contribute and we can do even more to enhance our infrastructure. That is what Canadians want.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Sturgeon River—Parkland Alberta

Conservative

Rona Ambrose ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, if foreign billionaires loan the Canadian government money for bridges, hospitals, and schools, they are not doing it out of the goodness of their hearts. They are looking for a return. Jobs will be a cost that is kept to a minimum, and taxpayer dollars will come second to their profits whenever a project goes over budget.

Can the Prime Minister explain what safeguards he will put in place to ensure that taxpayer dollars are treated with respect, and do not simply become a backstop for the margins of billionaire investors?

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we always treat our tax dollars with great respect in this government.

We have decided to make unprecedented investments in infrastructure, something that was never done by the previous government. We will invest $180 billion during the next 12 years in green infrastructure, social infrastructure, public transit, and transportation corridors. This is a good thing for Canada, and we have created an infrastructure bank so we can get even more money to put into our infrastructure.

Canadians want this. It creates jobs. It is good for the economy.

PensionsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair NDP Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal bill on pensions will penalize women who take time out of the workforce to raise kids, a protection that has existed since 1977.

The Liberal government insists that it is proud of the new Canada pension plan. How can it be proud of a plan that penalizes women? My question is simple. Was this an oversight in the drafting of this legislation, and if so, when will the government fix it?

PensionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Families

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to hear our hon. colleague talking about how proud everyone in the House is of the improvements to the Canada pension plan. These improvements will lift 300,000 families out of income insecurity in a few years. Most of these families consist of women. Beginning in 2019, this will lift 6,000 low-income workers out of insecurity, again, most of them women, all thanks to an increase in the working income tax benefit. This is very good news for all Canadians, and especially for women.

PensionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair NDP Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister dodged the question, and he knows it. I guess he must not really be that proud after all, which is why he imposed time allocation.

In 1977, the government reformed the Canada pension plan to ensure that women would no longer be penalized. The prime minister of the day was Pierre Elliott Trudeau.

Forty years later, the current Prime Minister is refusing to admit to the mistake and is using closure to shut down debate.

Trampling on women's rights like that is not very feminist, is it?