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House of Commons Hansard #140 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-37.

Topics

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, just a few weeks ago the Prime Minister heard first-hand the struggle of Ontarians who are facing out-of-control hydro rates at the hand of his mentor, Kathleen Wynne. Struggling Ontarians cannot afford the Prime Minister's plan to make a bad situation far worse by adding more costs through a carbon tax. A carbon tax would increase the costs of almost everything from gas to groceries.

When will the Prime Minister abandon this irresponsible tax on everything, and start defending the interests of Canadians?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Ottawa Centre Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, we will continue defending the interests of Canadians, such as reducing emissions and growing a clean economy. That is exactly what carbon pricing would do. I would like to remind the member that our carbon pricing will not come in until 2018, and all revenues will be given back to the provinces.

We are committed to growing a clean economy, reducing emissions, and ensuring a more sustainable future for our children.

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Conservative Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, the 2016 census figures show a worrisome trend in eastern Quebec. While the population of Canada increased by 5% over the past five years, the population of the Lower St. Lawrence region and the Gaspé dropped by 1.3% and 4%, respectively. Will the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development commit to scrapping the disastrous policies that prevent our businesses from keeping jobs in the region, or would he rather see our young people continue to move to large urban centres?

Regional Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, our government continues to focus on Quebec's economic development in order to create good jobs. Our government has taken measures to help Quebec. For example, since 2015, Canada Economic Development has invested over $406 million in Quebec and supported the development of over 10,500 businesses and organizations. We are going to continue to work hard for Quebeckers and all Canadians.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Shannon Stubbs Conservative Lakeland, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals took months to finally meet with the union representing employees of the case processing centre in Vegreville. Yesterday, it gave proof that the decision to close the office is unfounded, and that the quality of work being done by employees is exemplary and regularly surpasses departmental expectations.

I know that staff are scrambling to justify their advice, but is the minister now prepared to do the right thing, respect Vegreville families and rural Alberta and reverse this heartless decision?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, our government has a responsibility to make decisions on government spending of the hard-earned middle-class tax dollars.

When it comes to the issue of the case processing centre in Vegreville, I am happy to engage with the community. I met with the mayor, and yesterday I met with the regional representative from PSAC, as well as a community advocate on this issue. My door is always open to the community.

The relocation of the case processing centre to Edmonton is one hour away. All indeterminate employees will have an opportunity to continue their positions there. In fact, the relocation will result in more jobs for Alberta.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Shannon Stubbs Conservative Lakeland, AB

Mr. Speaker, the minister clearly has not been to the community.

The union reps presented the minister and his staff with detailed facts that his department will not share with Canadians. For example, Vegreville employees are right this minute working on new overflow cases from other processing centres, like they have done many times before. However, according to the minister, staff in Vegreville do not fit the requirements to process work from across the global departmental network.

Will the minister finally admit that his excuses for closing this office are complete nonsense and unfounded?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, we have a responsibility to make decisions on government spending of hard-earned tax dollars. The relocation we understand will have an impact on the community and staff, and all indeterminate employees are able to take positions in the new location.

The new location will have an expanded case processing centre and will actually create more middle-class jobs for Alberta.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Romeo Saganash NDP Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, an Ontario judge ruled in favour of those affected by the sixties scoop.

I have a simple question for the minister: will she give us her word in the House today that her government will not appeal this decision?

After the Ontario court found Canada liable for failing to protect survivors of the Sixties Scoop from losing their cultural identity, I have a very simple question for the minister. Will her government uphold this ruling? A simple yes or no would suffice.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I want to be perfectly clear. We will not be appealing this judgment. We want to get to the table as quickly as possible and be able to put in place the remedies necessary around language and culture, and all that these people lost during this dreadful chapter in our history.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Sheila Malcolmson NDP Nanaimo—Ladysmith, BC

Mr. Speaker, for almost 30 years families across Canada have been marching on Valentine's Day with Sisters in Spirit to honour the memory of murdered and missing indigenous women and girls.

We are glad the national inquiry was announced, but the government promised it would act right away to prevent further tragedies. More than 700 recommendations over two decades remain waiting for this government to act on, so there is a lot that can be done right now.

What will the government do now to prevent no more stolen sisters?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I believe that so many of the women marching today do expect results, and they do not expect to wait for the recommendations of a commission.

The commission is looking at all of those previous reports, but right now we know we need to act on shelter space, better housing, and the reforms of the child welfare system and the grievous harm that was done not only to the children that were taken, but also the moms who were left behind.

We will get on with these things right now. We will not be waiting for the results of the commission.

Public TransitOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Don Rusnak Liberal Thunder Bay—Rainy River, ON

Mr. Speaker, many residents of my riding of Thunder Bay—Rainy River rely on public transit to get to school, work, or doctors' appointments. In the fall, Thunder Bay received more than $6 million for new buses, transit shelters, and bus stop signage improvements, and on Friday, I was pleased to announce a new handi-van bus in Fort Frances. These investments will mean better transit services for the residents of my riding.

Could the minister explain how public transit investments are supporting communities like mine by growing the middle class and getting people home faster.

Public TransitOral Questions

February 14th, 2017 / 2:40 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi LiberalMinister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, as a former bus driver, I want to convey our thoughts and prayers for the Winnipeg Transit bus operator who was stabbed last night while serving his community and on duty.

I want to thank the hon. member for his question and his hard work. On Friday, in partnership with the municipalities and the Province of Ontario, we announced 79 transit projects in 29 municipalities. From new buses in Milton, Renfrew, and Orillia, to new transit shelters in Huntsville—

Public TransitOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Red Deer—Lacombe.

EthicsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Conservative Red Deer—Lacombe, AB

Mr. Speaker, apparently the ethics commissioner was not satisfied with the defence the Prime Minister attempted to use to clear up the ethical mess of his new year's trip. As a matter of fact, she confirmed in writing yesterday that she is launching yet another formal investigation.

The ethics commissioner, like all Canadians, is not buying the Prime Minister's nonsensical talking points, so when will the Prime Minister admit that he broke the rules, and finally admit that he is not above the law?

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to once again rise and remind members and Canadians that the Prime Minister has said many times that he will respond to any questions the commissioner has.

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Blaine Calkins Conservative Red Deer—Lacombe, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is going to be busy. We cannot throw a snowball around here without hitting a commissioner investigating the Prime Minister. He is under two ethics investigations as it is right now. We have the lobbying commissioner looking into his friends. We have the language commissioner, even, looking into things.

The Prime Minister is under all these investigations. He has no regard for the ethics laws. He just does whatever he wants. Does the Prime Minister really think he is above the law and the ethics rules do not apply to him?

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister and the government are committed to working hard for Canadians. That is why we are taking the steps and actions to ensure that we can respond to the very real challenges they are facing.

To respond to the member's question, I will remind the member, all members in the House, and Canadians that the Prime Minister will respond to any questions that the commissioner has.

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, after more than a year of questionable ethics, the Prime Minister has finally reached rock bottom.

The Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner finds that there is cause to launch a formal investigation into the Prime Minister's vacation on the Aga Khan's private island, despite the answers the Prime Minister himself provided to the commissioner's questions.

Now that he is formally under investigation, will the Prime Minister finally admit that he is not above the law?

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, our government is here to work very hard for Canadians, to deal with the real challenges that they are facing. As the Prime Minister said, and as we have said many times, we will answer any of the commissioner's questions.

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Marilyn Gladu Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, when I heard the Prime Minister, a Liberal MP, the head of the Liberal Party, and the founder of Canada 2020 took a private helicopter and were hosted by the Aga Khan for a week on a private island, I knew immediately this was against multiple rules. The ethics commissioner has examined the evidence for over a month, and during this time the Prime Minister has had the opportunity to alleviate her concerns. The fact that she is proceeding with a formal investigation speaks volumes. Will the Prime Minister just admit he broke his rules and admit there is no defence for his unethical behaviour?

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to once again remind members in this place, and to remind Canadians, that the Prime Minister will respond to any questions the commissioner has.

International TradeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Tracey Ramsey NDP Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, on the heels of yesterday's meetings in Washington, in an official release from House Speaker Paul Ryan, the U.S. is warning that it wants improved market access for America's dairy farmers. We all know that means our supply-managed sectors will be on the table.

Again, we see the Liberals in backroom conversations that are not being shared with Canadians. Thousands of jobs and families depend on Canada standing up for a fair deal. When will the Liberal government start telling Canadians the truth about NAFTA, and what exactly are the Liberals prepared to tweak?

International TradeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our government will continue to stand up for our farmers, producers, and their families.

In Washington yesterday and in the meeting with Speaker Paul Ryan, I strongly defended our dairy sector, as I always do and as I am proud to do.

We will look out for the interests of Canadians and their jobs. We will fiercely defend the national interest and will stand up for our values while doing so.