House of Commons Hansard #142 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was islamophobia.

Topics

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, I am always happy to stand and explain why it is important that we take serious action on climate change, not only because it is the right thing to do for the future of our children but also because it is going to make us more competitive, not less. We have created a scheme where we put a price on pollution. It is revenue neutral. It goes back to the provinces, and it is up to them to determine the best way to move forward.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Geoff Regan

I encourage the member from Banff—Airdrie, and others, to listen quietly during question period and wait their turn, as I was saying.

The hon. member for Parry Sound—Muskoka has the floor.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, here is the reality. Times are so tough for small businesses that Dave Purdon, a Gravenhurst butcher in my riding, was recently forced to sell off frozen meat at cut-rate prices just so he could pay his hydro bill. The Wynne Liberals are literally turning the lights out on small businesses, while their Liberal friends here in Ottawa are upping payroll taxes and dumping a carbon tax to boot.

It is clear the Liberals have no regard for our small businesses. When will they wake up and stop hurting our greatest job creators?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Toronto Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we know that having a competitive and effective business community is critically important. We know that the most important thing for businesses, large and small, is an economy that is successful. What we have done is help middle-class Canadians so they can buy things that they need and want. What we have done is help those most vulnerable so they can buy things for their families.

Importantly, we are making investments in our economy so we can actually grow the economy in the future, which will help small, medium, and large businesses to be better and to help our economy.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Dave Van Kesteren Chatham-Kent—Leamington, ON

Mr. Speaker, in my riding of Chatham—Kent—Leamington, greenhouse growers met Sunday to discuss their survival under the new Ontario cap and trade program. One owner said his electrical bill rose from $19,000 in December to over $40,000 in January. This new tax is forcing small family businesses to either shut down or leave town. Greenhouse growers are now talking about moving their operations to the United States.

How can the Prime Minister justify imposing a carbon tax, and follow down the same disastrous path of his mentor, Kathleen Wynne?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Ottawa Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, once again, I want to explain how carbon pricing works. We are putting a price on what we do not want, which is pollution, and putting a price on what we do want, which is good jobs in the economy of the future. We are going to take advantage of these opportunities. We are going to create a cleaner future, because that is the smart thing to do, and it is also the right thing to do.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Dianne Lynn Watts South Surrey—White Rock, BC

Mr. Speaker, close to a billion dollars in infrastructure funds will lapse this year. The Liberal election platform stated, “We will make sure that no money intended for investment in communities is allowed to lapse”.

The Liberals promised that any lapsed money would go directly to communities through the gas tax fund. However, only 4% of the $800 million is going into that fund. Will the Liberals commit to flow the entire $800 million in lapsed funding to communities, or is it just another broken Liberal promise?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods
Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, we are delivering more infrastructure for Canadian communities to grow the economy and create jobs for the middle class. Since taking office, our government has approved more than 1,200 projects, with a combined investment of more than $14 billion.

The member opposite knows very well that money committed to specific projects continues to be available for those projects. They may not happen this year; they happen in the next year. We are delivering on commitments, and we will continue to do so.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, new information is confirming what the parliamentary budget officer said and what everyone here in the House has been saying over and over again for months now.

The minister is late in distributing infrastructure funding, and this poses a huge risk to our country's economic growth. The Liberals promised that any lapsed money would go directly to municipalities all across Canada through the gas tax fund.

Can the minister assure us here today that he intends to keep the Liberal promise to redirect the $800 million to the gas tax fund, or is he going to break yet another Liberal promise?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

February 16th, 2017 / 2:35 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods
Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, the member very well knows that once we approve the project, then money is attached to that particular project, and all the project components are reimbursed when we receive the invoices for them.

We do transfer money through the gas tax. That is surplus money. We have done that. This year, $30 million was transferred through the gas tax to the municipalities.

Let me tell the hon. member that we are actively supporting the projects for all municipalities that are currently funded through infrastructure dollars.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Tracey Ramsey Essex, ON

Mr. Speaker, today the Prime Minister told Europeans what he has yet to admit to Canadians that concerns about trade deals like CETA are valid. He said, “Some people are worried that the current system only benefits society’s narrow elite. And their concern is valid.”

Does the Prime Minister realize that not everyone will benefit from CETA? Does he realize that it is estimated to cost 23,000 jobs in Canada alone? Canadians deserve to know what specifically the government will do to address job losses in Canada and the increased inequality that will be generated by this deal.

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country
B.C.

Liberal

Pam Goldsmith-Jones Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister said in his address to the European Parliament, CETA is a modern, forward-looking agreement that reflects a truly progressive agenda, which means societies have the ability to promote the public good. As well, CETA will create jobs, will increase our share of prosperity, and will help to grow the middle class.

We have put the interests of workers and consumers at the centre of our trade discussions so that Canadian companies from all regions and all sizes may have unprecedented access to 500 million people in the European Union.

Dairy Industry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Ruth Ellen Brosseau Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to rise in the House today to mark Canada's Agriculture Day for the first time.

However, the Liberals have every reason to feel a little uncomfortable, considering the 17,700 tonnes of fine cheeses entering Canada from Europe, the completely inadequate compensation, and some very troubling signs regarding our supply management system. This is an extraordinary and special day for our farmers.

Is the minister going to repeat the same old tune or is he going to announce an outstanding, solid plan for dairy producers?

Dairy Industry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I think my hon. colleague is fully aware that CETA will benefit the agricultural sector by $1.5 billion a year. I think she is also aware that this government put a transition plan in place for the dairy sector of $350 million, of which $250 million is to ensure that the dairy farmers—and I know what it is like to be a dairy farmer—have transition funds, and $100 million is to make sure that the processing sector has transition funds to ensure it—

Dairy Industry
Oral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Red Deer—Lacombe.