House of Commons Hansard #142 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was islamophobia.

Topics

Opposition Motion—Systemic racism and religious discrimination
Business of Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Conservative

Kelly Block Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, SK

Mr. Speaker, I cannot do that question justice. I would simply point out that again today, and even last night during the debate, there have been different definitions of the word thrown out. There have been suggestions that we can figure it out as we go, which does not do a service to all Canadians.

Opposition Motion—Systemic racism and religious discrimination
Business of Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

Iqra Khalid Mississauga—Erin Mills, ON

Mr. Speaker, I thank all colleagues in the House for the great passion and support they have shown on this very important issue. When I tabled Motion No. 103, I approached everyone. I approached grassroots organizations, civil society, and Canadians at large to see how they felt about an important issue that affects all Canadians: systemic racism and religious discrimination, including Islamophobia. The amount of support I have received from the House and from Canadians at large has been overwhelming.

As is part of my collaborative nature, I went across the aisle to seek support from members in opposition. I received tremendous support from members of the NDP caucus, and it was amazing to see. I approached members of the Conservative caucus, and I felt division among them, and it astounded me. I could not understand why they were so divided on this issue. Where one member proposed that “Islamophobia” be removed and replaced with “anti-Muslim discrimination”, another member proposed that the whole reference to e-petition 411, which was signed by 69,000 Canadians, be removed. There were other members who had not even read the text of the motion but were still opposed to it, based on I do not know what.

I really tried to build consensus in the House to raise awareness on this very important issue and to shed light on the more than one million Canadians who suffer because of Islamophobia, who are victimized on a daily basis. It astounds me, but I am very flattered that the opposition has used one of its very precious opposition days to continue the debate on this very important issue.

I believe that my time is up, and I will be continuing my speech after question period.

Opposition Motion—Systemic racism and religious discrimination
Business of Supply
Government Orders

1:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Mississauga—Erin Mills will have seven and a half minutes to complete her speech following question period.

Seasonal Work
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Bloc

Marilène Gill Manicouagan, QC

Mr. Speaker, on the North Shore, the fishery and forestry sectors provide thousands of jobs for Quebeckers. Thousands of families back home live from the sea and the forest.

Seasonal work is nothing new. No one has ever gone fishing in February and crops have never been planted in March, which means that there are people who work for the better part of the year, but who have to rely on employment insurance to fill the gap.

The spring gap, that time of year when neither income nor EI benefits are received, is 14 weeks. Fourteen weeks without a decent income is just terrible. Back home people are forced to leave the region, go into debt, or rely on the community's generosity even though they do work that is essential to Quebec's economy. The spring gap is 14 weeks. Ottawa is hindering regional development, contributing to the exodus from the regions, and leaving people in misery. It is disgusting.

The House can be sure that the Bloc will always be there for the unemployed in our regions who have been abandoned by this heartless government.

Val-Martin Infrastructure Project
Statements By Members

February 16th, 2017 / 2 p.m.

Liberal

Eva Nassif Vimy, QC

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to inform the other members of the House about all the work that has been carried out by various levels of government and has led to a decision that will help many people in my riding of Vimy.

On January 16, 2017, $18.2 million in federal funding was allocated for the first phase of the Val-Martin infrastructure project to renovate 124 social housing units in Vimy.

This significant investment in Quebec shows that Canadians' priorities are respected and that we are following through on our commitments.

I would like to thank everyone at the provincial and federal levels who worked on the long negotiation and planning process for this massive investment. This is a giant step that will help the most vulnerable people in Vimy gain access to affordable housing.

Phoenix Pay System
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Banff—Airdrie, AB

Mr. Speaker, Canada is known globally for its natural wonders, and people from all over the world come to experience our national parks. In my riding, millions of visitors come to Banff National Park every year. Banff is Canada's first national park and the crown jewel of the parks system. With free admission this year for Canada's 150th, more visitors than ever are expected to come see the beauty of Banff National Park.

Unfortunately, there are many Parks Canada employees who work in Banff who are not being paid their proper salaries, or even being paid at all, due to the issues with the Phoenix pay system. These employees help to make Banff National Park the top tourism destination it is. However, many of them are being forced to leave to take other jobs so they can finally receive a paycheque.

First, the government forced the implementation of the Phoenix system, despite warnings that it was not ready to go, and now it is dragging its feet while thousands of employees are struggling to makes ends meet.

I stand today to acknowledge the hard work of these employees and to demand that the government come up with a fix immediately for this pay fiasco.

Surrey—Newton Constituency Youth Council
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Sukh Dhaliwal Surrey—Newton, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to celebrate the impressive youth who attended the Surrey—Newton constituency youth council meeting this past Saturday. Over 60 young people of different ages, cultural backgrounds, educational pursuits, and political beliefs gathered to launch this initiative. Their ambitions include discussing public policy issues, advancing them through organizing events that will help to better integrate and involve youth within our local community, and most importantly, working together to make a positive impact for the residents of Surrey—Newton. Their enthusiasm is contagious, and their many ideas are exciting.

This is just the first gathering of this group, and I am very much looking forward to continuing to work with them over the coming months and days.

I thank all members of the Surrey—Newton constituency youth council.

Moose Hide Campaign
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

NDP

Gord Johns Courtenay—Alberni, BC

Mr. Speaker, February 16 marks the sixth annual gathering of men who belong to the Moose Hide Campaign. The Moose Hide Campaign is a grassroots movement of aboriginal and non-aboriginal men who are standing up against violence towards women and children. It was started by Paul Lecerte and his daughter Raven in response to Canada's missing and murdered indigenous women. Today there are 300 men on Vancouver Island fasting to demonstrate humility, sacrifice, and their determination to effect change.

The cycle of violence against women must stop. I am proud to wear the moose hide pin in support of the campaign, and I invite all members to do the same. Wearing this moose hide signifies a commitment to honour, respect, and protect the women and children in our lives and to work together with other men to end violence against women and children.

It is critical that we engage men and boys in our strategies to end gender-based violence. The Moose Hide Campaign is exactly the kind of leadership we need.

Louis Riel
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

MaryAnn Mihychuk Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, on Monday, Manitobans remember our founding father, Louis Riel.

Born in Winnipeg in 1844, he studied for the priesthood and law in Montreal. In 1868, he returned to the Prairies, and like his father, became a Métis leader.

He fought for all Manitobans. He was the head of our provisional government, which negotiated the Manitoba Act that established the Province of Manitoba. He was elected three times to the House, but was unable to take his seat. He believed and fought for bilingualism and multiculturalism. He is a hero to the Métis and all Manitobans. He is a father of Confederation.

Manitobans will remember him as a hero on Monday. In 1885, on the way to the gallows, he said, “I have nothing but my heart and I have given it long ago to my country.”

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, in a few short days, four months will have passed since the government agreed to bring Yazidi sex slave survivors to Canada. Yet, today, the government has brought zero, none, not one government-sponsored Yazidi refugee to Canada.

The international community is watching what Canada does on this issue. NGOs are waiting for the government to engage with them. I have a feeling that the government's inability to prioritize genocide victims as refugees to Canada, or to do anything to help them, is going to become the shame of our country.

Every one of us should be ashamed of the fact that there has been no action taken to date on this file. I implore the government to put partisan politics aside, to stand and actually do something, as members opposite laugh on this matter. We need to act now.

Bitter Harvest
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Borys Wrzesnewskyj Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to inform the House about the long-awaited motion picture premier of Bitter Harvest, on February 28, at the Canadian War Museum. This film was inspired by one of the most harrowing genocides of the 20th century, the Holodomor, or genocide by famine, planned and executed by Soviet dictator Stalin against the Ukrainian people in 1932-33.

Bitter Harvest is the compelling story of dignity, rebellion, and the power of love in the midst of horrific evil as seen through the eyes of a young couple caught up in the midst of Stalin's genocidal policies. It features such talented Hollywood actors as Terence Stamp, and Canada's own Barry Pepper. It is directed and co-written by Canadians George Mendeluk and Richard Bachynsky-Hoover.

The principal producer of this epic, Ian Ihnatowycz, is a constituent and successful entrepreneur, as well as generous philanthropist.

I encourage all members of the House to attend the premier of Bitter Harvest on February 28. I congratulate Ian without whom this motion picture would not have been possible.

Conservative and Liberal Hockey Teams
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Kyle Peterson Newmarket—Aurora, ON

Mr. Speaker, tonight an event of epic proportion will take place at 8 p.m. at the Canadian Tire Centre, home of the Ottawa Senators.

There is a buzz all across the national capital region. For the first time in years, the Conservative and Liberal hockey teams will faceoff for hockey supremacy. Two teams will compete, but only one will lift the trophy after the match.

I am not one to make predictions, and I will not attempt to do so today. I hear the Conservative team has some strong right-wingers, but our team has the ability to move from left to right, to left to right, which will come in very handy tonight.

Tonight's game is in support of the Terry Fox Foundation. Admission is free and donations will be accepted at the gate.

I urge every member of the House, especially those in the Ottawa area, to attend and to encourage their constituents to come out to support a great cause and to see, hopefully, a good game.

Defibrillators
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Scott Reid Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, ON

Mr. Speaker, statistics from Canadian police forces show that one life is saved every year for every 17 installed defibrillators in police cruisers. Thus, placing defibrillators in the trunks of all 5,600 RCMP cruisers would save 320 lives per year.

This was true when I raised this matter in the Commons three months ago. In the interim, 80 Canadians have died whose lives could have been saved. It was also true a year ago when I first raised this issue in the House. Since then, 320 Canadians have unnecessarily died.

Since the present minister in charge of the RCMP took office in October 2015, 420 Canadians have died. Of course, introducing defibrillators could not have been done with a snap of the fingers. However, with the passage of time, that excuse is no longer available to the minister, and the blood of most of these dead Canadians, enough to fill every seat in this room, is on the minister's hands.

Winnipeg Winter Festival
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Dan Vandal Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, MB

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, the Festival du Voyageur will be celebrated in the streets and restaurants by residents of Saint-Boniface—Saint-Vital.

The Festival du Voyageur takes us back to the days of the voyageurs and the fur trade at Fort Gibraltar.

The Festival du Voyageur's Fort Gibraltar, official sites and trading posts await us. In addition to amazing fiddling and jigging, there are also a winter fashion show, a new wood sculpting competition, and an incredible international snow sculpting symposium.

On February 20, we will celebrate Louis Riel Day, in honour of a Canadian whose vision is particularly relevant today.

His vision is one of inclusion of all cultures and all religions.

I invite everyone to attend the Festival du Voyageur being held in the heart of the continent at Saint Boniface and St. Vital.

Winnipeg Winter Festival
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hey ho!