House of Commons Hansard #142 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was islamophobia.

Topics

International Trade
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, about all I can do is tell my hon. colleague what this government has done and what this government will continue to do. We are the party that put supply management in place. We are the party that will protect and take care of supply management. We are the party that put a transition fund in place to make sure that the supply management sector in the dairy industry is modernized. We put money in place to make sure that the processing sector is modernized.

This government and this party will take care of supply management.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, every day there are more stories about refugees trying to cross the border into Canada from the U.S. These individuals are desperate, fleeing a country that is no longer safe for refugees. They know that the world has changed since the election of Donald Trump, and they are willing to risk their lives for a more secure future here in Canada. In these circumstances, why does the Liberal government insist that it is business as usual?

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

York South—Weston
Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen Minister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, we have proven to be a compassionate government when it comes to welcoming those fleeing war and persecution. We have a system in place that is one of the most compassionate refugee systems in the world. The U.S. executive order has had no impact on domestic asylum policy. Each and every eligible asylum claimant has access to a fair hearing, and each case is assessed on its merits.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
Oral Questions

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, except that there is a safe third country rule that says that, if they are coming from the United States, they are coming from a safe country and they cannot be treated as pure refugees as they normally would. That is the problem. Why does the government not see it?

With President Trump's order, the number of people seeking refuge here in Canada continues to grow, particularly because of the smuggling ring at the border, in Montérégie.

What practical measures will this government take to help these people and to support the communities that are taking them in?

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount
Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, we expect travellers to be treated respectfully and according to the law, on both sides of the border. Officers from the Canada Border Services Agency and U.S. Customs and Border Protection are in regular contact on this issue, and the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness will personally discuss the issue with his American counterpart, Secretary Kelly, in the next few days.

Political Party Financing
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the NDP has written a letter to Elections Canada asking for an investigation into the Liberal Party accepting donations that would violate elections law. Once again, there are ethical questions swirling around the governing party that promised to be the most ethical government Canada has ever seen. My question for the Liberal government is simply this. Under the law, what is the maximum donation they can legally accept?

Political Party Financing
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Burlington
Ontario

Liberal

Karina Gould Minister of Democratic Institutions

Mr. Speaker, Canada has strict rules when it comes to fundraising and political fundraising. In fact, it is because of these rules that parties report all contributions they receive to Elections Canada. All parties in the House have received over-contributions this year, as was the case in previous years and, as such, all parties in the House have repaid their over-contributions. I look forward to bringing forward legislation to continuously improve, to make our fundraising more open and more transparent.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Thomas Mulcair Outremont, QC

Mr. Speaker, the problem is that the Liberals have not and they have broken the law.

It is a matter of ethics. Canadians rejected a Liberal government and its sponsorship scandal, and then they rejected a Conservative government and its Senate scandal.

Do the Liberals really believe that, if they continue to deny the evidence of their turpitude, in the end, Canadians will believe them? That is highly unlikely.

Ethics
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Waterloo
Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as has been said in the House many, many times, the Prime Minister will answer any questions that the commissioner has. The Prime Minister has taken unprecedented levels of consultations and engagement with Canadians. This government is both approachable and reachable. That is why we will continue to respond to the very real challenges that Canadians are facing.

Taxation
Oral Questions

February 16th, 2017 / 2:25 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals say their carbon taxes are revenue neutral. Look at B.C., they say. Today, the Fraser Institute released proof that, over the next five years, B.C.'s carbon tax will collect $865 million more from British Columbian taxpayers than they will get back in tax relief. That is $728 per family of four. The federal Department of Finance has data tables showing exactly how much people will have to pay by income indicating the impact on the poor and middle class.

Will the government release those data tables now?

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ottawa Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, I will once again explain why pricing pollution makes sense, because it is pricing what we do not want, which is pollution, and it is fostering what we do want, which is innovation and cleaner technology—

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Geoff Regan

Order, please.

I realize everyone wants to take part in question period, but not everybody can. Everybody has to wait their turn until they have a chance to do so. I ask members to try to be patient, whether that turn comes today or another time, but to wait their turn and not interrupt and not speak when they do not have the floor.

The hon. Minister of the Environment.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

Catherine McKenna Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, we understand that putting a price on pollution will actually drive innovation and grow our economy, and as the former governor of the Bank of Canada said, now governor of the Bank of England, there is a $30 trillion opportunity, and we're going to take advantage of that in clean technologies.

Taxation
Oral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, they are not talking about putting a price on poverty. They are talking about putting a price on the poorest Canadians. They are the ones who will disproportionately pay the most because they spend a disproportionate amount of their income on the things that will be taxed, all to fund things like $150,000 Teslas here in Ontario, which I guess the government believes are affordable and in reach to the middle class and those wishing to join it.

When will the government put an end to the process of taxing those with the least to give to those with the most?