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House of Commons Hansard #145 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was pre-clearance.

Topics

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi LiberalMinister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, we are proud of doubling our infrastructure investments. Out of the $180 billion we will invest, only 8% will be flowing through the bank and we will leverage that money to engage the private sector to build more infrastructure to be able to meet this need, in order to close the gap that the previous government left through its inaction for the last decade.

InfrastructureOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, the minister should talk to the parliamentary budget officer. I think that conversation would be rather enlightening.

Yesterday, the parliamentary budget officer said that he might not be able to conduct an analysis of the new infrastructure bank.

It comes as no surprise that a Liberal initiative lacks transparency, but this only adds to our mistrust of the Liberals, who would rather come up with even more bureaucratic structures for their friends than approve job-creating projects across Canada.

Does the minister still plan to implement his bank or will he finally approve the thousands of projects for the small- and medium-sized municipalities that are still waiting for a green light?

InfrastructureOral Questions

February 22nd, 2017 / 2:55 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi LiberalMinister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, we have approved 1,300 projects since taking over and 50% of those projects are in communities with a population of fewer than 100,000. Out of those 1,300 projects, based on the information provided to us by our partners, provinces, and municipalities, 60% of those projects are currently under way, creating opportunities for Canadians from coast to coast to coast. We are proud of what we are doing in partnership, we are delivering infrastructure commitments that we made to Canadians.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, we know the Prime Minister broke with standard diplomatic process by announcing Stéphane Dion's dual diplomatic assignments to Europe before consulting the intended hosts. While dual responsibilities do occur occasionally, the Berlin and Brussels postings are among the most important relationships Canada has to manage. Could the Prime Minister explain the logic of Mr. Dion's twofer appointment?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the Hon. Stéphane Dion has always fought for a better Canada, a greener Canada, a Canada that is more united, and a Canada that is strong.

The European Union and Germany are strong friends and allies of Canada, as emphasized—

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order. I am having trouble hearing the answer. Members should see enough pink shirts around to know that it is anti-bullying day, and certainly interrupting and yelling is a form of aggression and bullying. Let us not have it here.

The hon. parliamentary secretary.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey Liberal Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, as I was saying, our relationship with Germany and the European Union was evident in the Prime Minister's visit last week.

We know that Monsieur Dion is extremely competent, talented, and progressive, and that Canadians can be assured that he will fiercely represent Canada and strengthen our relationship with both Germany and the European Union.

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, many of Canada's foreign service professionals, past and present, are highly critical of the mixed message the dual appointment sends to Germany and the EU.

A former Canadian high commissioner to the United Kingdom, also a former ambassador to the EU, says “We look like amateur hour.” Another former diplomat, also on the public record, says, “It will be impossible to do justice to both EU and Germany with one ambassador”.

Again, can the Prime Minister explain what message he is sending to our important allies with this bizarre appointment?

Government AppointmentsOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, once again, the hon. Stéphane Dion has always fought for a better Canada, a greener Canada, a more united Canada, and a stronger Canada. He is extremely competent, talented, and progressive.

The European Union and Germany are good friends and allies. As the Prime Minister emphasized in his speech before the EU Parliament last Thursday and during his bilateral visit to Germany, Canadians can rest assured that Mr. Dion will proudly represent Canada throughout the world.

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies NDP Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, this week the Liberal government approved a foreign takeover of vital health care and seniors facilities in British Columbia.

We know Anbang is a massive company whose ownership structure is murky at best. Recently, Morgan Stanley refused to do business with it, because it does not meet its code of ethics.

Seniors, health care workers, and British Columbians are greatly concerned by this takeover. Can the Prime Minister explain exactly what the net benefit of this takeover is, and whether this issue was ever discussed at a Liberal cash-for-access fundraiser?

Foreign InvestmentOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, as the member knows, we engaged with the B.C. government to make sure it was up to speed and to get its feedback.

Overall, this is about our government's commitment to being open to investment. We realize when we are open to investments, it helps grow the economy and create jobs.

Speaking about jobs, one of the commitments we obtained was to make sure that we have the current levels that exist within the organization. More importantly, we are going to make sure that we work with the company associated with this transaction to grow and expand its facilities.

The bottom line is this was done under the Investment Canada Act. There was a due process that was followed. This is in the best interests of Canadians.

Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

NDP

Niki Ashton NDP Churchill—Keewatinook Aski, MB

Mr. Speaker, it took a whole year and a half for the Prime Minister to visit the Far North, but northerners are still waiting for action from his government.

This week, northern leaders are meeting to discuss and develop a plan for the future of the Port of Churchill. They want the federal government to step in and nationalize the port, and work with first nations and local partners to take it forward. However, first, we need the government to stand up to the American billionaire who is holding us hostage.

When will the government show leadership, step in, stand up for Canadian jobs, and save the port and the community of Churchill?

Economic DevelopmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Mississauga—Malton Ontario

Liberal

Navdeep Bains LiberalMinister of Innovation

Mr. Speaker, I had the opportunity to go to Churchill and visit with the northern delegation. Based on the conversations I had with the community in the town hall session we had, our focus is really around jobs and growth in that area.

That is why, under the Western Economic Diversification fund, we committed to $4.6 million. These funds are allowing opportunities for people within that region to find opportunities for good jobs, particularly around Arctic research and tourism. We have approved a few projects.

It is about jobs. It is about supporting that region. We are committed to that particular initiative.

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Liberal decision to arbitrarily lift the visa requirement for Mexico will cost Canadian taxpayers at least a quarter of a billion dollars.

What is worse is that government officials also advised the Liberals that lifting the visa requirement on Mexico could mean that travellers involved in organized crime, illegal drugs, or human trafficking could enter Canada with greater ease.

Given that Mexico is a key origin point for drugs like cocaine, in lifting the visa requirement, are the Liberals charging Canadian taxpayers a quarter of a billion dollars to put their safety at risk?

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, our government is committed to rebuilding and strengthening the relationship with Mexico that was considerably damaged by the previous government.

I can tell members that the Mexico visa lift has resulted in lasting economic benefits for Canada, more tourism, and more international students coming to Canada. We work very closely with Mexican officials to address any risks and we continue to make sure that we work closely with Mexico to ensure that the visa lift is a success.

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Cooper Conservative St. Albert—Edmonton, AB

Mr. Speaker, last week, child killer and triple murderer Douglas Garland was sentenced to life in prison. Thanks to consecutive sentencing passed by the previous Conservative government, he will not be eligible for parole for 75 years.

Since the Prime Minister will not, will the Minister of Justice assure Canadians that consecutive sentencing for multiple murderers will not be gutted by the Liberals' so-called Criminal Code review, yes or no?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Granville B.C.

Liberal

Jody Wilson-Raybould LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to answer this question, and want to emphasize that egregious, heinous crimes are wrong and should be punished.

In terms of the Criminal Code, it already imposes the highest mandatory sentence of life imprisonment for murder, and judges have the ability to exercise their discretion in imposing consecutive sentences. We recognize and applaud judges who undertake to impose, based on their discretion, based on the individual in front of them, the appropriate sentence for the appropriate crime.

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

David Sweet Conservative Flamborough—Glanbrook, ON

Mr. Speaker, we will try another question for the justice minister.

Women and children are disproportionately the victims of human trafficking and are most commonly exploited for sex, yet the Liberals introduced Bill C-38, which would remove the requirement for human trafficking sentences to be served consecutively.

If the Prime Minister wants to have any credibility as a feminist, then he should start protecting the rights of human trafficking victims over the rights of perpetrators. Why is he giving human traffickers a break and turning his back on their victims?

JusticeOral Questions

3 p.m.

Vancouver Granville B.C.

Liberal

Jody Wilson-Raybould LiberalMinister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the question because it gives me the opportunity to speak to Bill C-38, which we introduced. Our government is committed to combatting human trafficking and better protecting victims of these crimes. We are going to ensure that this bill moves forward as expeditiously as possible. The changes that we made with respect to the previous private member's bill, Bill C-452, were to ensure that our bill is in compliance with the charter.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Fragiskatos Liberal London North Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, my community of London, Ontario, is home to one of the largest Yazidi populations in Canada.

Every member of the House agrees that helping the world's most vulnerable is a proud Canadian tradition.

Yazidi women, children, and other survivors of Daesh will be arriving in Canada, and the almost 400 who have already arrived have been through severe physical and emotional trauma. Would the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship please give this House an update on efforts to help this vulnerable group adjust to life in Canada?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for London North Centre for that excellent question and all members of this House for their advocacy and leadership on this really important matter.

Yazidi women and girls and other victims and survivors of Daesh have suffered the worst atrocities imaginable. We continue to work very closely with provinces, municipalities, and other government agencies, including school boards, to make sure that the right settlement supports are in place to meet the group's psychological and integration needs.

I also want to take the opportunity to thank Nadia Murad, with whom I spoke last night, for her tireless leadership. We know that Canadians will never forget her leadership on this file.

TaxationOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Blake Richards Conservative Banff—Airdrie, AB

Mr. Speaker, another day, another way the Liberals are trying to overtax small businesses. When they announced new rules requiring Canadians to report the sale of their principal residence to the CRA, it turns out it was just the Liberals trying to sneak in another new tax grab on small business owners.

Financial advisers are warning small business owners that this change will eliminate the capital gains exemption on the sale of their primary residence if they run a business from their home office. The Liberal war on small business continues.

Would the finance minister commit today to reversing this attack on hard-working Canadian small business owners?

TaxationOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to improving our economy, which will help small and medium-sized businesses to be successful. We know that making sure people actually register the principal residence when they sell it means that people do pay their fair share of taxes, if they are in fact required to pay taxes. We do know that in this country people have the ability to sell their principal residence without taxes, assuming that they in fact have that as their principal residence. That is the law of the land and that continues to be our position.

Persons with DisabilitiesOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Cheryl Hardcastle NDP Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, New Democrats believe that any legislation resulting from the government's accessibility tour starts with the full implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The measures resulting from consultations must deliver more than voluntary standards and awareness-raising activities. They have to support implementation. Will the Liberals do what they promised during the election and implement these important measures?