House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-23.

Topics

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, our fear that the Liberal commitment to the defence of Ukraine is fading became reality today. After ignoring appeals from Ukraine for almost a year, we now have an 11th hour bare bones extension of Operation Unifier, but this extension does not speak to the recent deadly surge in the Russian-backed war. It does not respond to Ukraine's request for an expansion of Operation Unifier, or to the appeal for defensive military weapons.

Why are the Liberals coming up short for a democratic ally?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

University—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, as I hope the hon. member for Thornhill will have the honour to recognize, our government and I personally stand very strongly in support of Ukraine. That is why I was absolutely delighted for us to extend Operation Unifier. We are there in Ukraine, as is the U.S., as is the U.K., with our 200 men and women in uniform. That is why I was delighted to meet with President Poroshenko on the outskirts of the Munich security forum two weeks ago.

I know the Ukrainians appreciate our support and understand Canada is Ukraine's strongest ally.

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, Ukraine expects more. We know the minister used to speak much more directly to the Russian invasion and occupation of Crimea and to the Russian-backed war in eastern Ukraine. For example, a year ago the minister stressed emotionally, “the Ukrainian people have made their decision [for democracy] in blood and we need to support it. That is essential for Ukrainian democracy”.

Why has the minister slipped into Stéphane Dion mode and ignored what Ukraine so desperately needs?

Foreign Affairs
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

University—Rosedale
Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, yet again I would like to say that I believe Canadians of all parties, the Conservatives, the Liberals, and the NDP, stand together in our support of Ukraine. That is why we had unanimous support in this House for the Canada–Ukraine free trade agreement. Our government, I personally, and the Prime Minister stand absolutely firmly in support of Ukraine. That is why our troops are staying there for another two years. The Ukrainians know it.

As for Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea and aggression against Ukraine in the Donbass, we condemn that as well.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Fin Donnelly Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, we were just shocked to hear the Liberals' response and that they are passing the buck to the provinces on first nations health and the environment.

A study funded by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans confirmed that a deadly disease has reached B.C. salmon farms. This disease is the third-largest killer of salmon in Norway, and now it is on our coast. If this disease grows, it will not only devastate farmed salmon but wild salmon as well. When will the minister do the right thing, strengthen the Fisheries Act, and protect west coast wild salmon? Thousands of jobs are at stake.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Minister of Fisheries

Mr. Speaker, I agree with my colleague that we need to strengthen the Fisheries Act. One of the things the Prime Minister has asked me to do is work with members of the standing committee, including the member who just asked the question, to strengthen the Fisheries Act and to restore lost protections, which were deleted some years ago. I look forward to that work with him.

With respect to investing in the science and the proper oversight to ensure that aquaculture operations on every coast can be done safely, the member knows we are committed to doing that. The member knows that we believe that middle-class economic opportunities on both coasts depend on aquaculture and wild fisheries, and we think the two can coexist safely together.

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

NDP

Rachel Blaney North Island—Powell River, BC

Mr. Speaker, Canadians deserve to know what went wrong on Sunday, when 1,500 litres of diesel spilled from a fish farm on the B.C. coast. This spill threatens the biodiversity of our coast and first nations' traditional food sources. As my constituents watched, horrified, many questions remain unanswered. Our coastal communities will live with the impacts of this spill for a long time to come. Will the government please update Canadians on its response plan?

Fisheries and Oceans
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Beauséjour
New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc Minister of Fisheries

Mr. Speaker, we share the member's concern and the concern of all Canadians when contaminants like this are leaked into Canada's marine ecosystems. I can confirm that on Sunday morning, when this spill was discovered, the Canadian Coast Guard and other partners, the Department of the Environment, Transport Canada, and the Province of British Columbia reacted very quickly to contain the spill, to clean up the spill. It would appear that some 600 litres of diesel fuel were released. Obviously, there will be an investigation. We believe firmly that the polluter should pay for a circumstance like this, but we also believe that we can do more to protect marine ecosystems and to invest in marine safety.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

John Barlow Foothills, AB

Mr. Speaker, in the last election, the Liberals promised to fund infrastructure projects, but I do not recall any promises about paying down Alberta's NDP debt. Alberta municipalities are furious. The NDP is funnelling hundreds of millions of dollars from the new building Canada fund to pay for its out-of-control spending.

In Okotoks, growth has stagnated, because we need a new water pipeline. A major flood-mitigation project in High River is on hold, because we need funding. What are the Liberals doing to ensure that money from the new building Canada plan is actually going to pay for these vital infrastructure projects?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods
Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform the hon. member that since taking office, we have approved 127 projects throughout Alberta. Of those 127 projects, with the exception of one, 126 projects are in municipalities of all sizes: Edmonton, Calgary, Red Deer, Lacombe, Lethbridge, and many others. We have committed to deliver infrastructure on behalf of municipalities, and we are delivering on that commitment.

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Matt Jeneroux Edmonton Riverbend, AB

I am sorry, Mr. Speaker, but Alberta cannot wait. The infrastructure minister is taking his friendship with Rachel Notley to a new level. The minister is now looking the other way while Notley funnels $300 million from the building Canada fund to pay down her debt, but none is going to job-creating infrastructure projects. Alberta is in a jobs crisis. This minister has chosen loyalty to Premier Notley over struggling Albertans. Why has this minister betrayed Albertans in crisis?

Infrastructure
Oral Questions

March 6th, 2017 / 2:50 p.m.

Edmonton Mill Woods
Alberta

Liberal

Amarjeet Sohi Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

Mr. Speaker, let me say what the president of the Alberta Urban Municipalities Association had to say:

We are pleased to have a federal colleague who is willing to work collaboratively with us. Our members value the ongoing infrastructure investment that is on the federal agenda, which will support significant and shovel-worthy municipal projects across Alberta.

There are 127 projects, 126 in municipal sectors, with a combined investment of $4.2 billion going into Alberta's economy.

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Phil McColeman Brantford—Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, we learned last week that defence plans on how to deter a 9/11 cell terrorist attack were inadvertently leaked to the CBC. On one hand, the minister puts a lifelong gag order on bureaucrats who are directly involved in executing his political orders, while on the other hand, the minister's department is openly sharing national security documents.

When will the minister stop playing politics with the defence department and take seriously the responsibility for Canadian security?

National Defence
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Vancouver South
B.C.

Liberal

Harjit S. Sajjan Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces take the security of sensitive information extremely seriously. We are constantly working to balance the requirement for openness and transparency while safeguarding information related to the security and defence of Canada.

In the last fiscal year, the department received over 2,000 access to information requests and released over 200,000 pages of documents to the public.

The classified documents were inadvertently released as a result of a human error. To avoid this in the future, we are reviewing this process to ensure that such a situation does not reoccur, and we continue to meet our legal obligations.

Science
Oral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Darshan Singh Kang Calgary Skyview, AB

Mr. Speaker, our government was elected on a promise to make historic investments in infrastructure, because we understand that infrastructure plays an important role in driving growth while delivering the housing, bridges, and roads Canadians need.

My question for the Minister of Science is: What investment is our government making in research infrastructure so that scientists have the tools to make Canada a world leader in research and innovation?