House of Commons Hansard #201 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was vehicles.

Topics

TaxationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, to the Minister of Finance having a deficit 80% bigger than planned is the signal of success.

The signal of success to Bombardier is that companies like them will be excluded from any of these tax increases, because they are big enough to trade on the stock market. The billionaire owners will pay only 55% on passive income held inside the corporation, while Stan Stewart, the roofer in my riding, will pay the new 73%. How is that fair?

TaxationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, what we know is that over the last 15 years, we have seen wealthy Canadians take advantage of the system that allows them to incorporate so they can pay lower tax rates than middle-class Canadians. We do not see how that makes sense.

I know the members opposite might feel that it is okay that wealthy Canadians pay a lower rate of tax, but we do not. We are looking to make sure our system works. That is why we are putting in measures that will actually make sure our system encourages investment in active business, that encourages our economy to be successful over the long term, while making sure our tax system is fair.

TaxationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Phil McColeman Conservative Brantford—Brant, ON

How about a small company?

TaxationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

TaxationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order, please. I have asked the hon. member for Brantford—Brant a number of times to try to calm himself. These are issues that people feel strongly about, but we need to take our turns, speak when it is our turn, and not when it is not.

The hon. member for Beloeil—Chambly.

Privacy ProtectionOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Matthew Dubé NDP Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Privacy Commissioner is worried that American customs will subject Canadians to intrusive searches of their electronic devices. Searching an iPhone is not the same as searching a suitcase. It is looking directly into people's private lives.

Could the minister stand and finally confirm once and for all that Liberals will stand up for Canadians' rights at the border, rather than playing right into President Trump's hands by giving more powers to American agents on Canadian soil with bills like Bill C-23? Let us not hear this talk about respecting the law, because the law is completely silent on this issue. Maybe we can get an update on that, while we are it, to protect Canadians' privacy.

Privacy ProtectionOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I hear, most definitely, the concerns of the Privacy Commissioner with respect to certain U.S. procedures. I also notice in the same report that he was far more positive about Canadian procedures and the work of the CBSA.

This is an area where technology is emerging and changing all the time. Obviously it is an area where we will have consultations and discussions with our American counterparts to ensure that the treatment of Canadians at the border is fair and professional, and consistent and respectful of the rights they have the right to.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, this afternoon, veterans and their families are gathering on the Hill to demand action on mefloquine, an anti-malaria drug with potentially severe side effects.

CF members were ordered to take mefloquine as part of a botched drug trial, and the results have been tragic. Both Conservative and Liberal governments have long ignored the calls for an investigation, leaving veterans and their families suffering.

Will the minister finally do something right and initiate a study to determine the long-term neurotoxicity of mefloquine?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, whatever the cause, we support veterans with service-related illnesses and injuries. Every situation is unique. We work with each veteran on his or her individual circumstances.

The health and well-being of our veterans is our top priority.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Luc Berthold Conservative Mégantic—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Finance showed that his government does not know anything about the reality of Canadian producers, ranchers, and farmers. His proposed tax changes will mean the end for family farms in Canada. Yesterday, the minister said the he wanted to talk to farmers about his proposal. That is the problem: it is harvest time and our farmers are hard at work.

If the minister really wants to talk to farmers, will he agree to extend the consultation period and listen to farmers who will tell him in person that his tax reform is not a good idea?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I can understand that my hon. colleague is from a party that fully encourages wealthy Canadians to form a tax system that means they do not pay the rate of tax that middle-class Canadians pay. We are going to fix that.

Along with that, I am very proud to say that we are improving the grain transportation system, which is a very vital part of making sure that the agricultural sector prospers. We have worked with farmers and are going to continue to work for farmers and we will make sure that farmers prosper.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Luc Berthold Conservative Mégantic—L'Érable, QC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, many farmers tried to get in touch with the Minister of Finance, but his voice mail is full. No one bothers to listen to the messages. What worries me is what the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food has said, or not said. He did not utter a word in defence of farmers who will have to pay for the Liberal government's out-of-control spending.

Does the minister agree with his Prime Minister, who has said that farmers, ranchers, and producers are wealthy, privileged people who are using their businesses to pay less taxes?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we inherited the tax system from the Harper government, which encouraged wealthy Canadians to incorporate to make sure they paid less taxes than the middle class. We think that is unfair.

I am certainly very proud to be part of a government that invested $100 million in science research in the agricultural sector. We have invested, and will continue to invest, in the agricultural sector to make sure that it is competitive worldwide.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

John Barlow Conservative Foothills, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals believe that it is only wealthy folks in gated communities who are going to be impacted by these punitive tax changes. Canadian farm families do not live in gated communities, and they will be impacted by these tax changes. Of course, the finance minister would know that if he picked up the phone and returned their calls, like he promised to yesterday.

Will the Prime Minister commit today to extending the deadline for these consultations past October 2 so that the finance minister can keep his promise and call our farmers back?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Toronto Centre Ontario

Liberal

Bill Morneau LiberalMinister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as I said, we want to work to make sure that we have a fair system. We want to make sure that we have a system that does not encourage wealthy Canadians to incorporate so they can pay a lower rate of tax than the middle class. This is really important. I assume that the members opposite do not want a system where the wealthy few can pay a lower rate of tax than the middle class. This is what we are going to address.

I will continue to listen to Canadians. When I heard yesterday of a gentleman named Terry, I called him today. I do not yet have the phone number for Nicole, but I would be happy to call her too. What I am trying to do is to listen to people across the country to make sure that our measures have the intended consequences and that we move forward with an economy that works for all Canadians.

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Kevin Sorenson Conservative Battle River—Crowfoot, AB

Mr. Speaker, Jake Vermeer owns a dairy farm in my riding. Jake has told me that these massive tax increases that the Finance Minister is threatening to impose on all Canadians will damage the successful farm and cost jobs.

Farmers often mortgage their homes, their home quarter, and their land in order to expand, innovate, and create jobs for the local rural community. Why is the Liberal finance minister treating these farms as nothing more than cash cows and jeopardizing the future of farmers in Canada?

Agriculture and Agri-FoodOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Cardigan P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay LiberalMinister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, I can understand that my hon. colleague is from a party that supports the ability of people to incorporate and pay less tax than the middle class. The fact is, we as a government feel that is not fair. We are going to fix that.

Also, for the dairy farmer, my hon. colleague must be fully aware that we have invested $350 million to make sure that the agricultural sector is on the cutting edge: $100 million for the processing sector, and $250 million for the dairy farmers. It is obvious that my hon. colleagues do not want to hear this, but we have worked and will continue to work with the agricultural sector.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

September 19th, 2017 / 2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow, the treaty on the prohibition of nuclear weapons opens for signature at the United Nations. More than 120 countries have approved the treaty, but not Canada. Tomorrow as well, on Parliament Hill, a huge treaty will be unveiled and open for signature to all those who believe in nuclear disarmament.

My question for the Prime Minister and all Liberal members is the following: will you join the thousands of Canadians who will be signing the nuclear weapons ban treaty tomorrow?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

I would remind the hon. member that she is to address her comments to the Chair.

The hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our goal is certainly nuclear disarmament and we are taking the necessary steps to achieve that goal. That means working hard on having something tangible. In 2016, for the first time, Canada rallied 159 states to support and adopt a resolution on the fissile material cut-off treaty. That is a clear step toward eliminating nuclear weapons both for nuclear countries and non-nuclear countries.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Jenny Kwan NDP Vancouver East, BC

Mr. Speaker, today the Department of Citizenship and Immigration still rejects permanent residency of family members based on their having a disability. The minister has admitted that this practice is outdated and “out of step” with what Canadians expect. The Liberals have been reviewing this issue for two years, and last week the minister met with the provinces, but there has still been no action. In the meantime, the future of families like those of Mercedes Benitez hangs in the balance.

Will the minister stop discriminating against children with disabilities and scrap this outdated provision?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Acadie—Bathurst New Brunswick

Liberal

Serge Cormier LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, I truly understand the concerns raised by the families grappling with this situation. We are conducting a thorough review of the policy regarding excessive demand, including by consulting the provinces and territories, because health care falls under their jurisdiction.

In fact, the minister recently met with the provincial and territorial ministers on this issue, and our goal is to strike the right balance between welcoming new members of Canadian society and protecting our public health and social services.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Mike Bossio Liberal Hastings—Lennox and Addington, ON

Mr. Speaker, I was proud last month when the government announced it was moving forward with dissolving the old colonial vestige of the Department of Indian Affairs and is in the process of working in partnership to create two new departments: one focused on moving the relationship with indigenous peoples to one based on recognition of rights, respect, and co-operation; and another department focused on improving current service delivery to indigenous peoples.

Recent comments by a member of the Conservative caucus have caused outraged. Can the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs comment on the impact these comments will have on the efforts of all Canadians toward reconciliation?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Toronto—St. Paul's Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Bennett LiberalMinister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, the senator's ongoing offensive comments regarding indigenous people are ill-informed, hurtful, and simply wrong. These disturbing views expressed by a sitting parliamentarian undermine progress toward reconciliation. Her removal from the Senate's aboriginal peoples committee was the right thing to do. If the Conservative leadership wants to demonstrate its commitment to reconciliation, it should remove the senator from its caucus.

TaxationOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Bob Saroya Conservative Markham—Unionville, ON

Mr. Speaker, Canadian entrepreneurs work hard and want to ensure that their children have a better life than theirs. These new tax changes will hurt these Canadians. The Prime Minister's intentions are clear: he wants to make local businesses pay more taxes to fund his out-of-control spending. This is not fair.

When will the Liberals stop their attacks on small business owners?