House of Commons Hansard #329 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-77.

Topics

International TradeOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is funny that the Liberals are trying to take credit for things we have already had for 25 years. They are trying to take credit for something that was negotiated under a previous Conservative government. We know what they sacrificed, what they gave up, in backing down to Donald Trump: higher drug costs for Canadian consumers and higher profits for American companies. We know they gave up a lot to Donald Trump, but what about on softwood lumber? Tariffs have killed jobs in the forestry industry in Canada for a long time. Have they finally put an end to Trump's tariffs on softwood lumber, yes or no?

International TradeOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, let me tell the member what we got for the softwood lumber industry. It is something called chapter 19. This dispute settlement mechanism is absolutely essential for our industry, and we—

International TradeOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

International TradeOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

Order.

I would ask the hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent to restrain himself.

The hon. member for Jonquière.

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Karine Trudel NDP Jonquière, QC

Mr. Speaker, the United States, Mexico and Canada have a new trade deal, but people in my riding and other Quebec regions are feeling left out. The Liberals opened yet another breach in supply management, not just on dairy but also on poultry, and they did not even manage to get rid of the aluminum tariff.

Where did we come out ahead? Nowhere.

Can Quebec really count on the Liberals to protect the strategic sectors that are aluminum, agriculture and softwood lumber?

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I will start with supply management. We fully support our dairy farmers, their families and their communities. This agreement will open up access to markets, but the most important thing is that the future of supply management is secure. I also want to emphasize that our dairy farmers will receive fair and equitable compensation.

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

NDP

Alistair MacGregor NDP Cowichan—Malahat—Langford, BC

Mr. Speaker, for months we have asked the Liberals if they would make concessions on supply management. Unfortunately, today we have our answer. Over 200,000 Canadian families depend on dairy, yet the current government just sacrificed domestic production. Our farmers are again on the hook for another country's overproduction problem. All five supply management sectors will take a serious hit, including chicken, turkey and eggs, making access to locally produced food more difficult, and increasing food safety concerns. The Prime Minister promised to protect supply management. Why did he break that promise?

International TradeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the members opposite of where this negotiation started. This negotiation started with a U.S. demand that supply management be abolished entirely. Throughout the negotiation Canada was clear this was a political choice for Canadians and that only Canadians would make it. This deal preserves supply management. It preserves a secure food supply for Canadians.

JusticeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Conservative Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Liberal government has the political, legal and moral authority to reverse the transfer of child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic to a healing lodge. The public safety minister knows the bureaucrats got it wrong, and it is his job to fix their mistakes. When will the minister, and the Prime Minister incidentally, do the right thing and put Tori Stafford's killer back behind bars?

JusticeOral Questions

October 1st, 2018 / 2:35 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as I said several times last week, Tori Stafford's brutal death in 2009 was a horrible gut-wrenching crime for the whole country. The killer, McClintic, was reclassified as medium security in 2014. The government of that day did not challenge that decision. In fact, McClintic remains in a medium security correctional facility today. I have asked the commissioner of corrections to examine the decision-making process to make sure that all policies were properly followed, and more than that, to ensure that the policies themselves are correct, and to identify—

JusticeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Parry Sound—Muskoka.

JusticeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Tony Clement Conservative Parry Sound—Muskoka, ON

Mr. Speaker, the killer was behind bars. Now the killer is enjoying life in a healing lodge after being convicted of the first degree murder of Tori. It is very clear and very simple actually. The government can give a policy direction, and the policy direction can include Terri-Lynne McClintic as the killer of Tori Stafford. When will the minister immediately give that direction in response to this outrageous transfer and reverse it for the people of Canada and the family of Tori Stafford?

JusticeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, the issues involved in this case are being very carefully examined by the commissioner of the correctional service, subsequent to my request that she do so. I have asked her not only to look at the decision-making process to ensure that proper procedures and policies were followed, but also to look at the policies themselves and to report to me on whether those policies are in fact sufficient, proper and appropriate in the circumstances to protect public safety and to ensure that justice is done.

JusticeOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, this weekend, in a letter to the Prime Minister, Tori Stafford's dad Rodney asked for one simple thing, that his daughter's killer be put back behind bars, where she was when we were in government.

Rodney wrote, “I really have to question our Federal Government as to why convicted child murderers, such as Terri Lynne McClintic, deserve more rights than their victims & law abiding Canadians?”

Tomorrow, we will be debating our motion calling on the Liberals to take action to ensure that this murderer is put back behind bars. Will the Liberals support our motion and will they act?

JusticeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to reviewing in great detail the correspondence from the father of Tori Stafford. The hearts of all Canadians go out to him and other members of the family who have suffered such anguish. Obviously, the objective here is to ensure that justice is done, and to ensure that Canadians are always safe and secure. I have asked the commissioner of the correctional service to examine all of the facts of this case and all of the policies that were applied to ensure that the proper standards are adhered to.

JusticeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Candice Bergen Conservative Portage—Lisgar, MB

Mr. Speaker, the government has the authority today and the responsibility to do something about this injustice. For starters, as a government it can change the policy to ensure that this killer is put back behind bars. It can hide behind empty excuses, but ultimately the buck stops with the Prime Minister.

As Tori's dad said, “Obviously, every Canadian out there can tell you this is wrong.” We agree with Tori's dad. Do the Liberals agree with Tori's dad? Will they act with the power and authority they have, and make this wrong right by putting Tori's killer back behind bars?

JusticeOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, I will await very anxiously the report that I have requested from the commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada. It is very important to proceed in this manner, in an appropriate, strong way. I will do that. I am waiting for her report. As soon as I get that report, I will take the appropriate action.

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Brigitte Sansoucy NDP Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, QC

Mr. Speaker, not only does the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada fail our agricultural producers, but it is also going to increase prescription drug prices for some chronic diseases such as arthritis. This is a really tough pill to swallow, especially considering that this is Seniors Week. Seniors are one of the most vulnerable groups in our society and are already struggling to pay for their medication.

Do we really need another Liberal study to bring in a national pharmacare program?

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we know how proud Canadians are of their public health care system. We continue to work with the provinces, territories and our partners to lower costs and ensure rapid access to prescription drugs. This issue is important to our government. We look forward to attracting new medical research to Canada. Our government will always stand up for our healthcare system.

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Murray Rankin NDP Victoria, BC

Mr. Speaker, as if prescriptions were not expensive enough, this new NAFTA deal will make them even more expensive. This deal will increase drug costs for Canadians with arthritis, Crohn's disease and other chronic conditions. It will also increase the cost for drug plans by tens of millions of dollars every single year. By extending patents, Canadians are going to have to wait two more years before affordable generic drugs are available.

Since this new trade deal does not make prescription drugs more affordable, will the Liberals immediately introduce universal, affordable pharmacare for Canadians?

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, our government knows how rightly proud Canadians are of our public health system. We are going to continue to work with provinces, territories and our partners to lower drug prices and provide timely access to medicines for all Canadians. We also look forward to attracting further medical research to Canada. Our government will always stand up for our public health care system.

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Bratina Liberal Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, October is Women's History Month in Canada. During this month we celebrate the many accomplishments of women and girls in our country and are encouraged to learn more about the remarkable women and girls who have advanced gender equality for everyone.

Could the Minister of Status of Women tell the House what our government is doing to honour the lives and legacies of courageous women and girls from coast to coast to coast throughout Canada's history?

Status of WomenOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Peterborough—Kawartha Ontario

Liberal

Maryam Monsef LiberalMinister of Status of Women

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate my colleague on his recent appointment to the Standing Committee on the Status of Women. His efforts will no doubt contribute greatly to our government's daily efforts to advance gender equality and grow the middle class. During Women's History Month, we honour women in Canada's history who have paved the way for the rest of us and celebrate those whose stories shape history today.

To that end, our government is launching a new online resource to celebrate over 100 women of impact and we are also encouraging all Canadians, including members of the House, to use #makeanimpact and celebrate the story of a woman making a difference in their communities.

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

Sylvie Boucher Conservative Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d’Orléans—Charlevoix, QC

Mr. Speaker, when the Liberals came to power in 2015, the woman who murdered eight-year-old Tori Stafford was locked up, behind bars, in prison. Today she is residing at a healing lodge, where children often stay for visits. It is unacceptable.

The Prime Minister is well aware that he is the only one that can reverse this decision.

Will the Prime Minister stand up for victims' rights and reverse this decision so that this murderer goes back behind bars?

JusticeOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member knows, I have asked the commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada to examine all the details of this particular case, including the processes by which the decisions were taken and to ensure that those processes were followed, but more importantly to examine the policies themselves to determine if they are appropriate in order to keep Canadians safe and to ensure that justice is done. I will anxiously await her report.