House of Commons Hansard #348 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was disabilities.

Topics

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:45 a.m.

NDP

Sheila Malcolmson NDP Nanaimo—Ladysmith, BC

Madam Speaker, Vancouver Aquarium research just warned that climate change threatens our coast even more than before. Climate plans fall well short of what is needed. Oceans are warming and sea levels are rising much faster than anticipated. Alarm bells are ringing for our coast, but the government just bought a leaky old pipeline.

The government just called this an existential crisis. Is the government not embarrassed to still be using Harper's discredited climate change targets?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Sean Fraser Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.

Madam Speaker, it is my pleasure to rise once again to offer a response on the important issue of climate change.

I am aware of the evidence that the hon. member opposite cites and take this problem very seriously.

We played an integral role at the Paris conference in achieving an agreement that would meaningfully move the needle in the fight against climate change.

In order to implement our plan domestically and reach our targets, we are putting a price on pollution. We are investing in clean energy. We are helping small businesses become more efficient.

It is a pleasure to be part of this government that takes this threat seriously. We have to work to grow the economy at the same time.

I am pleased to work with the member across the aisle to move the needle forward on both of these initiatives.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Linda Duncan NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Madam Speaker, revelations of the staggering scale of liabilities in the hundreds of billions for the cleanup of mines and well sites has stunned Canadians. However, for those who have long called for full disclosure of the true cost of reclamation of industrial sites in advance of project approvals, this comes as no surprise. The federal government holds the power to prevent downloading of this massive liability.

I call on the government to act now on Alberta's demands, amend the federal bankruptcy and creditor laws and give higher priority to environmental cleanup to end the downloading of liability to Canadians.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Paul Lefebvre Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.

Madam Speaker, it is critical for Canada's resources to be developed in a sustainable way so that economic growth and environmental protections go hand in hand.

Provinces manage their own environmental liabilities. They are responsible for having the tools to mitigate potential risks associated with upstream oil and gas development. Our government works with provinces and territories to support their regulatory regimes and share best practices.

In budget 2017, we made a $30 million investment in support of Alberta's efforts to advance the reclamation of orphan wells. While this important task remains with the province, we have been able to show our support.

EthicsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Kelly McCauley Conservative Edmonton West, AB

Madam Speaker, the President of the Treasury Board has tried to downplay his ties to Irving, claiming that he was only copied on one letter. According to the lobbyist registry, he has met with Irving 16 times in the past two and a half years.

Does the President of the Treasury Board still want to claim that he has had little contact with Irving, or perhaps his meetings with the Irvings were just part of a pilot project?

EthicsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Madam Speaker, again, I presume the hon. gentleman's question relates to the issues presently before the courts. There is an outstanding legal proceeding before the courts and between the prosecution and Vice-Admiral Norman. The parties to that proceeding will seek disclosure of documents. That is routine. If any of those relevant documents are in the possession of the government, the government will provide them to the court, but it is up to the court to decide and not the House of Commons. The court will determine how to apply any rules with respect to privilege or confidence.

EthicsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Kelly McCauley Conservative Edmonton West, AB

Madam Speaker, it sounds like he has confirmed that the President of the Treasury Board is part of the court action. The President of the Treasury Board claims that he interfered with the Davie ship deal as part of his job to oversee spending. At committee yesterday, he was not able to name one other contract that he thought was part of his job to review, not even the failed Phoenix pay system.

Why did he only interfere with the Davie deal, and what is he trying to hide?

EthicsOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Madam Speaker, again, the tactic being employed by the opposition is to drive by with smears and innuendoes. That is the very reason we have the sub judice rule in the House of Commons that members of Parliament should not ask questions and ministers should not answer questions that could somehow impinge upon an outstanding court proceeding. The court will determine what documents are relevant. The court will determine what rules of privilege and confidence apply. The court has the jurisdiction in this matter.

JusticeOral Questions

11:50 a.m.

Conservative

Shannon Stubbs Conservative Lakeland, AB

Madam Speaker, Liberals always put criminals ahead of victims and law-abiding Canadians. Tori Stafford's killer was transferred from jail to a healing lodge on their watch. Today, her loved ones are gathering to call for action, demanding that child killers be kept behind bars, not in healing lodges without fences. However, so far the Liberals refuse to act. Canadians are outraged about it.

What is taking so long, and when will the Liberals actually do the right thing and put Tori's killer back behind bars where she belongs?

JusticeOral Questions

November 2nd, 2018 / 11:55 a.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Madam Speaker, all members of the House share the deep angst of the families who have tragically lost children to crime. That is why I asked for a thorough review by the corrections commissioner to ensure that long-standing policy in these matters has been followed, and to reassess the appropriateness of those policies to determine that they are, in fact, the right ones. The report was made available late yesterday. I am reviewing it at the moment. We all want this system to be as good as it can possibly be for the protection of the public.

PensionsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Eva Nassif Liberal Vimy, QC

Madam Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour announced changes to the Canada Labour Code. We have all heard the stories of Sears workers. In my riding, Vimy, the layoffs also affected our community. Middle-class workers in Vimy felt they were not well served by Conservative policies, which only benefited the wealthy.

Could the parliamentary secretary tell the House what these announcements mean for middle-class Canadians in my riding?

PensionsOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Cape Breton—Canso Nova Scotia

Liberal

Rodger Cuzner LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment

Madam Speaker, I would like to thank the member for Vimy for her hard work on behalf of those Sears workers. It was great. We can all agree here in the House that Canadians benefit when there is growth in the economy. Where we differ here from the Conservative opposition is that we do not believe any growth should take place on the backs of workers. We want workers to get a fair shake in this country, and that is why we announced yesterday the doubling of benefits in the wage earner protection program. That will benefit her Sears workers. I am proud to be part of a government that takes action for Canadian workers.

Carbon PricingOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Dane Lloyd Conservative Sturgeon River—Parkland, AB

Madam Speaker, this week we learned that the Liberal government would give a carbon tax exemption to New Brunswick's Belledune coal facility. Now, the Liberals have admitted that their carbon tax on large emitters will kill jobs, but the fact is that this carbon tax is already costing jobs in my community.

Why does the Liberal government give exemptions to Liberal ridings while punishing hard-working Canadians?

Carbon PricingOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Marco Mendicino Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Lib.

Madam Speaker, we look forward to working with the Government of New Brunswick to protect our environment and grow our economy. New Brunswickers, like all Canadians, know that we need to take action on climate change. That is something my Conservative friends have not yet realized. We will continue to work with the Government of New Brunswick and our Liberal New Brunswick caucus, which we are very proud of, to promote clean growth, to strengthen the middle class and to continue to deliver for all Canadians.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Ken Hardie Liberal Fleetwood—Port Kells, BC

Madam Speaker, our government knows the importance of taking action to protect our species and wildlife. That is why this week we are taking unprecedented new measures to further help the recovery of B.C. southern resident killer whales. The new measures include $143 million invested in critical steps to protect this west coast icon.

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment please further explain the steps the government is taking to protect our southern resident killer whales?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Sean Fraser Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.

Madam Speaker, I thank the member for Fleetwood—Port Kells for raising this important issue and his advocacy to protect this iconic species.

We take our role to protect the southern resident killer whale very seriously, and that is why I was incredibly proud to stand beside the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans this week to announce new measures to protect this species.

These measures include an investment of $61.5 million, which includes funding to support marine habitat restoration. Importantly, we will also be strengthening controls on five harmful contaminants that we know have an impact on this species when their food resource is scarce and interfere with their reproduction.

We are going to continue to protect nature and wildlife that these species depend upon.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Conservative

Pat Kelly Conservative Calgary Rocky Ridge, AB

Madam Speaker, the Minister of National Revenue keeps claiming that service is her priority, yet under her watch, service continues to get even worse, despite the budget increase. She has been picking on single parents, she has not reviewed all of the disability tax credits she took away, she has taken no meaningful action on offshore tax avoidance and evasion, wait times are getting longer and the call centre is still a disaster.

Will the minister stop claiming that service is her priority and start delivering service to Canadians?

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

11:55 a.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Madam Speaker, my colleague opposite is comparing apples and oranges. Fighting tax evasion, especially abroad, is a priority for our government, as is service to Canadians. The Conservatives are in no position to lecture this side of the House considering the cuts made to the Canada Revenue Agency when they were in power.

We are working on it. People will receive the credits and benefits to which they are entitled.

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Bloc Joliette, QC

Madam Speaker, I have some big news. Yesterday, the government announced that Davie will not get to build a single ship. Instead, starting in 2021, it is getting just one maintenance contract worth less than 2% of the shipbuilding strategy.

Thanks to delays at Irving and Seaspan, the Asterix is the only ship the government has received. Davie, the best shipyard in America, delivered that ship on time and on budget. However, despite the success of the Asterix, the government has been slow to award it the Obelix contract, yet it can offer risk-free guarantees to the wealthy Irving corporation.

Could the minister explain why he is so intent on undermining Davie? Why the fixation?

Public Services and ProcurementOral Questions

Noon

Carla Qualtrough Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility, Lib.

Madam Speaker, of course we recognize Davie's excellent work. Yesterday, we announced that part of a contract worth $7 billion would go to Davie. This summer, we committed $610 million for the construction of three icebreakers. We are continuing to work with Davie. The Department of National Defence has determined that there is no operational need for a second ship. We are continuing to work on shipbuilding in Canada.

Government SpendingOral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Bloc Joliette, QC

Madam Speaker, it is still only 2% of the contract.

We learned this week that after governors general have completed their mandates, during which they are grossly overpaid to eat canapés on the taxpayers' dime, their office expenses are paid for life.

Adrienne Clarkson alone is still costing us over $100,000 a year, even a decade after her retirement.

Will the government give a detailed account of all the expenses reimbursed to all governors general, especially before Michaëlle Jean gets wind of this scheme?

Government SpendingOral Questions

Noon

Sean Casey Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Lib.

Madam Speaker, Canadians can be proud to be represented by such inspiring, dynamic governors general. They provide a great service to Canada, and that is why they continue to be supported throughout the years after they have left. Clearly, Canadians expect transparency and accountability when public money is spent. We will carefully examine the support arrangements to ensure that best practices are being followed and that Canadians' expectations are being met.

Government SpendingOral Questions

Noon

Bloc

Simon Marcil Bloc Mirabel, QC

Madam Speaker, that was some mighty fine kowtowing. We already know that governors generals do not really do anything. Why should taxpayers have to pay for this?

It is unbelievable that they can claim office expenses for the rest of their lives. It is even more unbelievable that these aristocrats do not even have to disclose where the money is spent.

The Prime Minister said that he expected greater transparency.

Will he open the books instead of opening his wallet for these freeloading carpetbaggers?

Government SpendingOral Questions

Noon

Sean Casey Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Lib.

Madam Speaker, as I just said, we are very proud of our Governor General, who represents our country. We are reviewing the spending policy to ensure that it meets the degree of transparency that Canadians expect.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

Noon

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Madam Speaker and friends, a month from today, the climate negotiations will begin in full at COP24. The agenda will be the IPCC report on 1.5° and a review of every government's actions and whether we are on track. We know that some countries have done a huge amount, but collectively, we are off course. We are headed for the risk of global extinction. This is not a joke. We are running out of time. We have one chance, and one chance only. Can Canada show leadership and go, accepting the target of 45% by 2030, or do we give up on our children?