House of Commons Hansard #259 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was c-50.

Topics

EthicsOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, immediately after the report was released, the Prime Minister accepted responsibility and accepted the findings of the report. The member opposite needs to be corrected. Even within the report, and I encourage the member to read the report in its entirety, she recognized that he did not contravene subsection 6(1) because he did not participate in or make any decisions relating to the Aga Khan and his institutions. As well, he did not contravene section 7 because he did not give preferential treatment to the Aga Khan.

I encourage the member opposite to have respect for this institution and to do the important work we are here to do. We, on this side, will always respect officers of Parliament.

MarijuanaOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies NDP Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, we are five months away from the Prime Minister's promised July 1 deadline for cannabis legalization, but now the Liberal government is backing away from that date, causing confusion and concern. Meanwhile, thousands of mostly marginalized Canadians are getting slapped with criminal records for offences that are about to be legal, and the government is not saying if, when, or whether they will provide them with amnesty.

Why is this government hypocritically prosecuting Canadians? Why will it not commit to a fair pardon process, and when will cannabis be legal in Canada?

MarijuanaOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, this is a huge change in Canadian law and it must be approached in a sensible, orderly, practical way. Until Parliament has passed the legislation and enacted a new regime, the old regime remains in effect and that law must be respected.

In the meantime, I think all Canadians understand the government's objectives to do a better job of keeping cannabis out of the hands of our kids, a better job of keeping illegal cash out of the hands of organized crime, and to increase safety on our roads. That is what Bill C-45 and Bill C-46 will accomplish.

MarijuanaOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, that means the authorities will keep saddling people with criminal records.

The media are reporting that, in the run-up to marijuana legalization, U.S. authorities are concerned about slowdowns at the border. With thousands of people still burdened by criminal records for simple marijuana possession, the government is offering no guarantees that there will not be problems at the border after legalization, even if people are pardoned.

Can the government reassure those thousands of people that everything will be fine when they try to cross the border in the future?

MarijuanaOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Regina—Wascana Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, we have had ongoing discussions with American officials, including the new ambassador of the United States to Canada and the new Department of Homeland Security secretary.

Our various agencies are discussing what is necessary to ensure that there is a smooth flow at the border in terms of people crossing in the ordinary way, remembering always that the export or the import of cannabis has always been illegal and will remain illegal. Canadians need to know what the American requirements are, and we will make sure that Canadians understand very clearly what the law is.

EthicsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, while the Prime Minister continues to downplay the scandal related to his breaking the law and violating the ethics rules of the House, we continue to believe that no one is exempt, including our princely current Prime Minister.

I would like him to admit that he deliberately tried to exempt himself from a federal law, and that he abused the system and the trust of Canadians by making taxpayers pay for his family vacation.

Can the Prime Minister tell us whether he will pay back the cost of his family vacation, which was paid for by Canadian taxpayers?

EthicsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as has been the case for past prime ministers and is the case for the current Prime Minister, whenever and wherever the Prime Minister travels, there are costs associated with security.

The former commissioner has acknowledged that these costs were incurred as part of the Prime Minister's duties.

EthicsOral Questions

February 7th, 2018 / 2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, we accept the findings of the Ethics Commissioner's report. The commissioner found that by accepting a gift from someone who has business dealings with the government, the Prime Minister broke the law. When the Minister of Health incurred questionable travel expenses, the Prime Minister forced her to pay it back. When the Prime Minister spends $200,000, however, for an illegal vacation, he excuses himself.

Why will he not do the right thing and pay it back?

EthicsOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, immediately after the report was released, the Prime Minister did the right thing by accepting responsibility and accepting its findings. The Prime Minister has been present in the House and has answered over 1,400 questions. Immediately after the report was released, the Prime Minister made himself available to the media to ensure that he did answer questions, and to ensure that Canadians had the answers that they deserved.

The Prime Minister went one step further and travelled the country at open, available, and public town halls to answer questions directly from Canadians. Canadians are concerned about the economy. Canadians are concerned about many other issues. The Conservatives refuse to focus on the economy because they know our plan is working.

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

Mr. Speaker, there have been a number of Liberals who have repaid inappropriate expenses, which was the right thing to do, and yet we have the first Prime Minister in the history of our nation found guilty on four counts of ethics violations, refusing to pay back taxpayers. The same Prime Minister is so afraid to talk about his law-breaking that he hides behind his talking points on the middle class. Let us talk about that.

When was the last time a middle-class Canadian family spent over $200,000 on a family vacation? It begs this question. Why the double standard?

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as I have said, immediately after the report was released, the Prime Minister accepted responsibility and accepted the findings of the report.

The member is correct. This government will continue to focus on Canadians. While the Conservatives choose to focus on the Prime Minister and this government, the Prime Minister and this government will continue to focus on Canadians, to focus on the very real challenges that they face.

You will notice, Mr. Speaker, that our plan is working. Canadians have created 422,000 jobs, jobs for Canadians by Canadians, because of the strategic investments that this government is making in Canadians. Once again I repeat, this government and the Prime Minister will continue focusing on Canadians.

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Conservative

John Brassard Conservative Barrie—Innisfil, ON

I do agree with one thing with the government House leader, Mr. Speaker. The Liberals are focused on ripping off Canadians and they are focused on living a champagne and caviar lifestyle off the backs of hard-working taxpayers.

The Prime Minister knew his actions were illegal and he tried to hide it. The rules do not apply to him: taxpayer-funded nannies, tax changes that do not affect him, millions to terrorists, mandate letters not worth the paper they are written on. It is Liberal hypocrisy on steroids.

Will the Prime Minister do the right thing and repay taxpayers, yes or no?

EthicsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism

Mr. Speaker, as I have said on numerous occasions, immediately after the report was released, the Prime Minister accepted responsibility and accepted its findings. The former commissioner has acknowledged that there are costs that are incurred as part of the role of the Prime Minister. When it comes to our security agencies, we take their recommendations, we take their advice, and we will continue to do so.

This government will continue to focus on Canadians to ensure the economy is working for Canadians. We will make sure that the immigration rules are working to reunite families. This government will continue to focus on veterans to ensure they have the services they deserve. This government will continue to focus on Canadians.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, more than 20 civil society groups in Canada have raised serious concerns about military agreements with the Philippines.

Yesterday, we learned that Canada sold combat helicopters for hundreds of millions of dollars to the Duterte regime, which has a terrible human rights record.

How can the Liberal government justify selling these helicopters to the Philippine army when it knows that this regime could use them against civilians?

What about our principles?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have received no application for an export permit related to this contract.

The Prime Minister and I have been very clear about the Duterte regime's human rights violations and extrajudicial killings, including during our visit to the Philippines.

I will conduct an extremely rigorous human rights analysis of any potential export permit application related to this contract.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

NDP

Randall Garrison NDP Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, BC

Mr. Speaker, one of the cruel ironies of this helicopter deal is that Philippine President Duterte, who is unquestionably presiding over one of the world's worst human rights situations, once admitted to throwing a man out of a helicopter and said that he would do it again. This is a country where extrajudicial executions continue to be condoned by the president.

It is absolutely clear that this deal would never be approved under the human rights standards required by the Arms Trade Treaty. Will the minister stand in the House now and indicate clearly that there is no way that the export of these helicopters to the Philippines will be approved?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalMinister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we have received no application for an export permit related to this contract. The Prime Minister and I have been very clear about the Duterte regime's human rights violations and extrajudicial killings, including while in the Philippines.

I will conduct an extremely rigorous human rights analysis of any potential export permit application related to this contract. I have the power to deny a permit if I feel it poses a risk to human rights, and I am prepared to do so.

Families, Children and Social DevelopmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Liberal Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, today the ministry of families, children and social development welcomed the Yukon Minister of Health and Social Services Pauline Frost and the other Yukon government representatives to Ottawa to sign our government's seventh agreement on early learning and child care.

Thanks to this agreement, Yukon will receive more than $7 million over the next three years to ensure that Yukon children can receive the best possible start in life.

Could the minister please tell the House how this money will be spent?

Families, Children and Social DevelopmentOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Québec Québec

Liberal

Jean-Yves Duclos LiberalMinister of Families

Mr. Speaker, I would first like to thank and congratulate our dear colleague from Yukon for his hard work on behalf of Yukon families and children.

I was pleased and proud to sign, with the Government of Yukon, an agreement that will increase, by more than 30%, its investment in early learning and child care to the benefit of educators, parents, including, of course, mothers and children. This is part of a 10-year long-term plan to increase the accessibility, the quality and affordability of early learning and child care for all Canadian families and children.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Cathay Wagantall Conservative Yorkton—Melville, SK

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the legion condemned the comments made by the Prime Minister in regard to veterans. It said, “These sorts of words are extremely insensitive to Canada’s Veterans...”. We agree.

Veterans know that the Prime Minister broke his promise to them, and to add insult to injury he has made dismissive comments, claiming that they are asking for too much. They are only asking for what he promised.

When will the Prime Minister apologize to our veterans for his extremely insensitive comments?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, we are committed to the well-being of veterans and their families. We have kept our promise.

The new lifetime pension option is a monthly non-taxable benefit for life that recognizes pay and suffering and provides income replacement up to 90% of a soldier's pre-release salary indexed annually for life for those who need it.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister says that our veterans, my former colleagues, and the defence minister's colleagues are asking for too much, but he came to an understanding with a known terrorist and quickly cut him a cheque for $10 million.

During the election campaign, the Prime Minister promised that he would not drag our veterans to court. The election is over and the promises have evaporated.

Can the Prime Minister explain why he is so out of touch with the military and especially with injured and disabled veterans?

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I am always glad to have the opportunity to speak to the government's record on veterans and to compare it to those on the other side.

Let me take our new pension for life proposal and talk about a 30-year-old veteran, with 12 years of service, with osteoarthritis of his spine and multiple joints, and hearing loss, who is 60% disabled. He or she would receive over $4,600 a month across his or her lifetime in pain and suffering compensation, and income replacement; $1,000 a month in caregiver support; and $80,000 for post-secondary education. That is very real.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Veterans Affairs likes to show up and say that this money and that money is being spent, and that the Conservatives did nothing. The Conservatives did one thing. They avoided making promises they could not keep. When we say something, we follow through.

The Canadian Legion even said that the Prime Minister's remarks were completely unacceptable. The Prime Minister has a total lack of respect for veterans. He is keeping them in court.

I want to know why veterans have to fight to get their money. After all, ISIS terrorists are getting money without having to work.

Veterans AffairsOral Questions

2:50 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Veterans Affairs

Mr. Speaker, a corporal who served five years in the regular forces and suffered 100% disability is entitled to nearly $6,000 a month in benefits; an additional $1,000 a month for caregiver support; nearly $72,000 through the critical injury benefit; an additional financial assistance to modify her vehicle and her home to meet her needs.

Our pension for life option is very real, and it is the least we owe our veterans.