House of Commons Hansard #281 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was women.

Topics

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Markham—Stouffville Ontario

Liberal

Jane Philpott LiberalMinister of Indigenous Services

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for Sudbury for his question.

I was delighted recently to make an announcement of a $1.6-billion investment in the first nations-led Watay Power that will bring hydroelectric power from the Ontario grid to 16 first nations.

This is the largest indigenous-led hydroelectric project in the history of the province, and it has the largest scope.

This will reduce GHG emissions, the equivalent of taking 35,000 cars off the road, and will create close to 800 new jobs.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Conservative

Garnett Genuis Conservative Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, AB

Mr. Speaker, China is becoming more and more aggressive, building military installations throughout the South China Sea, and today, holding live fire drills in the Taiwan Strait.

Canada's government has thus far declined to condemn Chinese aggression in the South China Sea, and has never stood up for Taiwan.

The Prime Minister can promote peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific by condemning clear acts of aggression. Will he?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Fredericton New Brunswick

Liberal

Matt DeCourcey LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs

Mr. Speaker, for our government, the promotion and protection of human rights in all our engagements, including those with China, remain primordial and a priority.

We raise human rights situations and actions at all opportunities to engage with our Chinese counterparts, including at the highest levels. We continue to encourage China to live up to its international commitments. We do that through ongoing and frank dialogue, as we work towards a more stable relationship with China. We will never hesitate to raise concerns, whether they be human rights in nature or for China to live up to its humanitarian and human rights obligations.

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach NDP Salaberry—Suroît, QC

Mr. Speaker, according to the tender for the dismantling of the Kathryn Spirit, the contractor had to provide an emergency response plan 30 days before the work began. However, when a fire broke out in the wreck, the 75 firefighters who responded had to work without an emergency plan because the only thing that Groupe St-Pierre provided them was a layout of the vessel. That is not much help in putting out a fire.

What is more, the Beauharnois fire chief assured me that, if his men are not given a list of the contaminants that are still on board the wreck, they will no longer respond to emergency calls to the vessel. That is very worrisome.

Will the government stop minimizing this issue and finally launch an investigation?

The EnvironmentOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Beauséjour New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc LiberalMinister of Fisheries

Mr. Speaker, we do not need to conduct an investigation. We need to dismantle the Kathryn Spirit, and that is exactly what our government is doing.

We recognize the risks that vessels of concern pose to shoreline communities and the marine environment. As my colleague knows full well, a small fire broke out in the machine room of the Kathryn Spirit during work to dismantle the vessel on April 10. No one was injured, and no pollution was observed. That is what is important to us. We also think it is important to quickly dismantle the Kathryn Spirit, and that is what we are going to do.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Michael McLeod Liberal Northwest Territories, NT

Mr. Speaker, our government believes that a sustainably developed resource sector is essential to the success of the Canadian economy. Getting this right requires us to work with indigenous peoples as equal partners through well-defined, predictable processes, like we do through co-management regimes across the north.

Could the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs update this House on the steps taken to ensure co-management is at the forefront of discussions on northern resource development?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Labrador Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Yvonne Jones LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Northwest Territories for his tremendous leadership on northern issues in Canada.

Canada's northern co-management approach to resource development is an example to the world, and one we are proud of. Both territorial and indigenous partners came together at the UN Permanent Forum on co-management in the north, because it has ensured that indigenous people are equal partners in determining the best use of their lands and their resources. Together, we will continue to develop a shared vision, one that is strong, prosperous, and sustainable.

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Todd Doherty Conservative Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, the fisheries minister laid out critical bid criteria for those interested in the lucrative surf clam quota, such as the successful applicant must be an indigenous company, in respect of which shares are owned by indigenous persons or groups.

However, we know the winning bid was not even incorporated until weeks after the announcement was made. We know that a Liberal MP's brother and a former Liberal MP are going to get very rich.

Will the minister table the bid criteria scores so we can all see how his Liberal family and friends won a bid without a company, without a boat, and without indigenous partners?

Fisheries and OceansOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Beauséjour New Brunswick

Liberal

Dominic LeBlanc LiberalMinister of Fisheries

Mr. Speaker, I can give my hon. friend points for imagination, but I cannot give him points for sticking to the facts with what happened.

The fact that there is a new participant in this lucrative surf clam fishery should not surprise the Conservative Party. In fact, that party began a process three years ago to do exactly that, include a new entrant. What the Conservatives forgot to do was to include indigenous communities.

We are very proud that the most impressive economic benefit to indigenous communities and Atlantic Canadians came from a group that included indigenous partners in five provinces: four Atlantic provinces and Quebec. We chose the best proposal and we are proud of that.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

GPQ (ex-Bloc)

Luc Thériault GPQ (ex-Bloc) Montcalm, QC

Mr. Speaker, Quebec has always been a desirable destination for newcomers, but ever since the Prime Minister issued that irresponsible invitation, Quebec has been facing an immigration crisis, and Ottawa is not taking the issue seriously.

The case processing backlog at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada is years long, yet the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship sees fit to tell Quebec what to do. That is irresponsible and unacceptable, as Quebec has said.

The government's carelessness is costing Quebec a lot of money. Will the government make a decision by the end of the day and reimburse Quebec for those costs?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

York South—Weston Ontario

Liberal

Ahmed Hussen LiberalMinister of Immigration

Mr. Speaker, Canada is an open and welcoming country for people who need protection. That being said, our government is committed to ensuring orderly immigration.

This government is working very closely with Quebec on the irregular migration issue. We have worked very closely with Quebec on the intergovernmental task force on irregular migration. We have our ninth meeting tonight at which we will discuss issues of mutual concern.

We have worked very closely with Quebec to make sure there is extra funding for newcomers and integration in Quebec, an increase of over $112 million.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

NDP

Charlie Angus NDP Timmins—James Bay, ON

Mr. Speaker, in a moment, along with my colleague from Abitibi—Baie-James—Nunavik—Eeyou, we will be asking for unanimous consent on an important motion, because it is up to the Parliament of Canada to accept our role and obligation in furthering the work of reconciliation and in addressing the still harsh wounds from the forcible removal of indigenous children to destroy indigenous identity in the residential school system.

There have been extensive talks among all the parties, and I sincerely hope that you will find unanimous consent in this Parliament for this motion:

That the House call on the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops to (a) invite Pope Francis to Canada to apologize on behalf of the Catholic Church to indigenous people for the church's role in the residential school system, as outlined in Call to Action 58 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report; (b) to respect its moral obligation and the spirit of the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and resume the best efforts to raise the full amount of the agreed upon funds; and (c) to make a consistent and sustained effort to turn over the relevant documents when called upon by survivors of residential schools, their families, and scholars working to understand the full scope of the horrors of the residential school system in the interest of truth and reconciliation.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipOral Questions

3:15 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

No.

Interparliamentary DelegationsRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Paradis Liberal Brome—Missisquoi, QC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian delegation of the Canada-France Interparliamentary Association concerning its participation at the Visit to Paris of the Executive, held in Paris, France, from December 4 to 8, 2017.

HealthCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

April 18th, 2018 / 3:15 p.m.

Liberal

Bill Casey Liberal Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 14th report of the Standing Committee on Health, entitled “Pharmacare Now: Prescription Medicine Coverage for All Canadians”. Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report.

I want to point out that this was a parliamentary initiative. It is the most extensive report we have done. It is really well done. We have spent two years on it. We have had 130 presentations from the best experts around the world. We have engaged the Parliamentary Budget Officer for a year to confirm the financial implications of such a program.

The national pharmacare study answers these questions: Will we save money, and will we have better health care with a national pharmacare program? The answer is yes.

I want to thank all the members from all sides for the work they have done. I also want to thank the analysts, who have produced a wonderful report, and the researchers, the chair, and the clerk of the committee for doing great work on this really important study.

HealthCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:15 p.m.

Conservative

Marilyn Gladu Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative members of the Standing Committee on Health agree that the important issue of access to prescription drugs for all Canadians needs to be addressed. However, we feel that some portions of this report require further work for us to really understand the cost of the recommendations, including the use of more up-to-date figures that are now available. The federal government will also need to consult with the provinces and territories, which have jurisdiction over these areas, as well as with the more than 80% of Canadians who already have coverage, some of whom have excellent private insurance and may be unwilling to switch to a standardized public plan. More work needs to be done, and as such, the Conservatives have tabled supplementary information to this report and call on the Minister of Health for action.

HealthCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bill Casey Liberal Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, we acknowledge the comments by the Conservative member. Certainly the report does not have all the answers, but it is a great first step.

I now have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 15th report of the Standing Committee on Health in relation to Bill C-326, an act to amend the Department of Health Act, drinking water guidelines. The committee has studied the bill and has decided to report the bill back to the House with amendments.

I want to thank the member for Lac-Saint-Louis for developing this private member's bill. It calls on the government to conduct a review of drinking water standards and to make recommendations on our national guidelines.

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

Larry Bagnell Liberal Yukon, YT

Mr. Speaker, if the House gives its consent, I move that the 59th Report of the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs, on committee membership, presented to the House earlier this week, be concurred in.

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Procedure and House AffairsCommittees of the HouseRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Liberal

The Assistant Deputy Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

(Motion Agreed to)

Canada Summer Jobs ProgramPetitionsRoutine Proceedings

3:20 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Conservative Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise in the House today to table three petitions from 184 constituents. These petitioners call to the government's attention that, as it is now written, the application form for the Canada summer jobs program forces employers to choose between their charter-protected freedoms and eligibility for government programming. They are calling on the government to remove the discriminatory attestation requirement from the Canada summer jobs application and to respect the charter rights of all Canadians, even those individuals who differ in political ideology from the government of the day. This brings the total number of petitioners on this issue to 493.