House of Commons Hansard #374 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was child.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. member for Sarnia—Lambton will now lead us in the singing of the national anthem.

[Members sang the national anthem]

French in QuebecStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Monique Pauzé Bloc Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, we thought that the Prime Minister had appointed a Liberal minister of heritage, but yesterday it became clear that he appointed a minister of Liberal heritage.

The Liberal heritage includes sponsorships, Option Canada, and a refusal to recognize Quebec as a distinct society. The Liberal heritage includes disdain for Quebec French. If we oppose multiculturalism, we are racist. If we want a secular Quebec, we are racist. If we want a French Quebec, we are racist. If we want newcomers to integrate with us, we are accused of using an “us” based on colour.

The Liberal heritage includes denigrating and insulting anyone who does not think like them. The Liberal heritage includes walking all over Quebec to score points in English Canada. Enough is enough. This is unbelievable. The best way to integrate newcomers is to be able to communicate with them. French is a unifier, not a divider, of people in Quebec, and we are very proud of that.

Edna BeangeStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Liberal Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I rise to celebrate the life of one of the most prominent residents of Don Valley West, Edna Beange. She died a few weeks ago at the wonderful age of 98. An East York icon, a long-time city counsellor, an inspiring activist, Edna followed in the tradition of strong Leaside women like Agnes Macphail, making a difference in our community right until she died.

Edna served as a leader with numerous agencies, primarily those concerned with housing, seniors and youth, including the Toronto Council on Aging, East Metro Youth Services, the Canadian Mental Health Association, the Children's Aid Society and Stay at Home in Leaside.

Among the many awards and honours she received, in 1994, Edna was the first recipient of the Agnes Macphail Award, which honoured and celebrated her citizenship and her leadership.

Edna was a force of nature. To her son Donald and daughter Jean, I offer not condolences but thanks for sharing this remarkable woman with Toronto, Ontario and Canada. She will never be forgotten.

Peter CalamaiStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Peter Kent Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to remember a former colleague and friend, Peter Calamai, an old-school, fastidiously articulate journalist's journo, a self-described ink-stained wretch.

Peter covered city hall, foreign conflict, science and literacy beats and was recognized for his in-depth work with three National Newspaper Awards, a Governor General's award, a Michener Award, an Order of Canada and an honorary doctorate.

Covering Africa out of Nairobi for Southam papers he hosted with Mary great dinners for itinerant hacks, with updates on his performances with the local opera company. Named a “master bootmaker” by the Sherlock Holmes society, friends eagerly awaited his annual Christmas letter in Dr. Watson's voice, detailing that year's travels of Peter and his beloved “Dame Mary”.

In recent, retired years, Peter was a driving force in establishing a foreign correspondent fellowship in the name of his predeceased friend Jim Travers.

Regrettably, it is Mr. Calamai's turn for tributes. May he rest in peace.

Frank SernakStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Vance Badawey Liberal Niagara Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, the people of Niagara Centre have lost an incredible talent. Frank Sernak enjoyed a successful radio broadcasting career of over 50 years, much of that time spent with CHOW radio in the cities of Welland and Port Colborne.

Frank's distinctive, calm and soothing voice guided a generation through many events, including the blizzard of 1977. Frank and a few others stayed on the air throughout the entire weekend, during the worst of the storm, providing much-needed updates to the many thousands of people affected throughout the Niagara region. While he may have been known for his voice, Frank was beloved for his selfless dedication to our entire community.

A frequent volunteer, Frank was a sought-after master of ceremonies, giving his time to many community events such as the Rose Festival in the city of Welland.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Rose, Frank's wife of over 60 years, and all of his many family and friends. While Frank may have left us, the legacy of his modesty, kindness, wit and charm will not soon be forgotten.

Social Activism in WindsorStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Cheryl Hardcastle NDP Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am energized after being home in Windsor—Tecumseh with young women who are not discouraged by big issues with no quick fix. They understand the power is within each of us to collectively make the profound changes we see needed. My thanks to Jada Malott, Mira Gillis, Maya Mikhael, and Gabby Wilkinson for standing up against exploitation, hunger, pain and violence. Do not stop because so many do not yet have a strong voice.

In the twilight of January 17, I was in Dieppe park where on both shores of the Detroit River, Canada and the U.S together held a vigil of light and love for the women we have lost and a silent resolve to end violence against women. My thanks to Michelle Mainwaring and Pat Papadeas for their initiative. To Terry Weymouth, Anuja Virani and Irene Moore Davis, my thanks for being both trailblazers and pathfinders.

When we work to end violence against women we address many problems facing society. It takes love and courage. Together we are better.

Canadian Tennis PlayerStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Omar Alghabra Liberal Mississauga Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise to boast about a Canadian rising tennis star.

Eighteen-year-old Bianca Andreescu was born in Mississauga and trained at the Ontario Racquet Club. Here is what she accomplished in just one month. She started 2019 by defeating two tennis giants, Caroline Wozniacki and Venus Williams, eventually reaching her first WTA final at the ASB Classic in New Zealand. A week later, she won her first-ever grand slam match at the Australian Open, and now, this past Sunday, Bianca won her first-ever WTA title at the Newport Beach tournament in California. Four weeks ago she was ranked 152nd in the world. Today, she has surged to number 67. She is now Canada's number one women's tennis player.

Mississauga and all of Canada are incredibly proud of Bianca. Her impressive skills and achievements are just the beginning. We say, “Go, Bianca, go!”

FinanceStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Conservative Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Mr. Speaker, welcome to 2019, the year when the budget is supposed to balance itself, for those who still believe in the Liberals' promises.

Since he has never had to budget to make ends meet, the Prime Minister said yes to every expense submitted to him, happy to charge it all to the government's credit card.

However, it is Canadians who will be stuck footing the bill. In fact, they already are, through increased Canada pension plan deductions for workers and employers and the elimination of the public transit tax credit, not to mention the carbon tax, which will increase the cost of travel, heating and food.

Forty-six per cent of Canadians are $200 away from financial insolvency, yet the government wants to raise taxes even more to pay for its own mistakes. Forget about the second term. The government is already admitting it would take eight terms for it to balance the budget, in 2040. At the rate we are going, it will have added $275 billion to the debt by then.

Canadians got fooled once, but they will not be fooled again.

Performing Arts FestivalStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Liberal Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, today I rise to commemorate a special birthday in my riding. PuSh International Performing Arts Festival is a signature event in Vancouver's arts and culture sector, celebrating its 15th anniversary this month. Since 2003, PuSh has gone from a three-show series, drawing 2,500 people, to 21 performances at three Vancouver venues, drawing international audiences with its thought-provoking program.

Every January, this unique, multidisciplinary festival promotes diversity, inclusion and creativity while providing performers with an outlet to push the limits of their art. This is all thanks to founder Norman Armour whose bold vision has guided PuSh to its place today.

In the last two years, our federal government has given PuSh $1 million to ensure its success. On this important milestone, I wish PuSh all the best in the many years ahead with more extraordinary entertainment that continues to challenge artistic boundaries.

Thai PongalStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Shaun Chen Liberal Scarborough North, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to rise to recognize the valuable contributions of the Tamil community in Canada.

Earlier this month, Tamil Canadians celebrated Thai Pongal, a four-day festival of thanksgiving for a successful harvest.

Thai Pongal celebrates peace and abundance, when families gather to enjoy rice pudding.

January is also Tamil Heritage Month, a time to highlight the role of Tamil-Canadians in our collective success. Recently, I attended events hosted by the Canadian Tamil Congress and the National Council of Canadian Tamils, both located in my riding of Scarborough North. They remind us that this year also marks the 10th anniversary of the end of the Sri Lankan civil war, which affected many in Canada's Tamil diaspora. Their stories are a stark reminder of the need for lasting peace and reconciliation.

Nandri vanakkam.

Oil and Gas IndustryStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Pat Kelly Conservative Calgary Rocky Ridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals said they bought the Trans Mountain pipeline to guarantee construction would start in 2018, but the money just went to build American pipelines instead. They claim they did not kill northern gateway, as if the minister did not even know that a ministerial order had been signed and there was a shipping ban. They claim that the company just decided on its own not to build energy east and that it was not because of regulatory changes. Now, following an Alberta production curtailment, with another new round of energy industry layoffs imminent, the government refuses to pull Bill C-69.

All Alberta wants is for the government to stop making things worse, stop killing projects, stop dreaming up new ways to kill future projects, stop insulting construction workers and stop the empty platitudes. Instead of saying that their hearts go out to Alberta they should just apologize, or better still, kill Bill C-69.

Charlottetown Urban Beehive ProjectStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown, PE

Mr. Speaker, things are really buzzing in Charlottetown these days. Earlier this month, Charlottetown's urban beehive project, by Nine Yards Studio, was presented with a medal under the community initiatives award category at the 2018 National Urban Design Awards.

Local architects Shallyn Murray and Silva Stojak created demonstration beehives that encourage a hands-on approach to bee education, allowing the public to see how honey is being produced, and to learn all about pollination and the industry of beekeeping. The hives are housed in Charlottetown's largest urban garden, the Prince Edward Island Farm Centre. Through Plexiglas windows, visitors can safely observe the bees working away in their hives. A hexagonal amphitheatre allows for even more learning opportunities.

I extend my congratulations to the Charlottetown urban beehive project for receiving this prestigious award. It is a great example of how design can play an important role in our community, our development and our environment.

Indigenous AffairsStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Michael McLeod Liberal Northwest Territories, NT

Mr. Speaker, two weeks ago, I was pleased to welcome the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations to my riding.

We travelled to Norman Wells to celebrate the signing of the self-government agreement in principle with the Norman Wells Land Corporation. This is a significant step for the Norman Wells Dene and Métis, transferring authority for law-making and enforcement for those areas that are important to their rights as indigenous peoples. Entrenching this authority is important for future generations of the Sahtu, as well as for Canadians in general.

We are building government-to-government relationships with indigenous peoples based on respect and understanding. This is what real reconciliation looks like. We need to keep working toward finalizing land claims and self-government agreements, not only because they strengthen local participation in decision-making, but because they also create certainty about the ownership, use and management of land and resources.

Cancer DiagnosisStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Conservative Niagara Falls, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is my great honour to rise in the House today to give a well-deserved tribute to Hugh Segal. He is known to all of us as a senator, an educator, an author, a champion of the less fortunate and a leader. We know him to be a kind, decent and honest man, whose love for his country and family is unparalleled.

As a columnist and political pundit, Hugh always provides a balanced view and profound insight into Canada and our world beyond. His well-deserved awards include the Order of Canada, honorary doctorates from the Royal Military College of Canada and Queen's University, the Order of Ontario, and the Peace Patron Award. Put simply, Hugh Segal embodies the very best of humanity, and the world desperately needs more Hugh.

Today we learned that Hugh is battling cancer. I want him to know we are praying for him and his family as he continues this fight.

We all know cancer can be beaten. If Hugh's history is any indication, it does not stand a chance.

Pierre De BanéStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Fayçal El-Khoury Liberal Laval—Les Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, Pierre De Bané, a good friend of mine and a former parliamentarian, passed away on January 9, 2019. I would like to honour his memory by expressing how grateful I am for all of the help and good advice he gave me.

Mr. De Bané was the first Lebanese Canadian to sit in the House of Commons and the Senate, where he served for 45 years. Over the course of his political career, he was responsible for several portfolios under Pierre Elliott Trudeau's government.

Pierre De Bané studied and taught law. He was a staunch supporter of the French language and his community in the Lower St. Lawrence. This fine man paved the way for future generations, and I am one of those who followed in his footsteps.

Parliamentary colleagues, let us pay tribute to the memory of Pierre De Bané.

Health Care ProvidersStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, the federal government has a responsibility to provide Canadians with sustainable, affordable, universal and accessible health care. We have repeatedly heard the Prime Minister declare himself a feminist. Meanwhile, health care providers such as VON Canada worry about their ability to provide quality care to seniors in their homes.

Seniors' needs are increasingly complex and require the services of professionals, who are now being forced out of home care into other health sectors because of low pay.

The current government could demonstrate commitment to its promises by implementing and funding wage parity for health care providers. Canadian workers, Canadian seniors, Canadian families and indeed Canadian women are worth it.

Mental HealthStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Marilyn Gladu Conservative Sarnia—Lambton, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is Bell Let's Talk day. One in five Canadians will experience a mental health issue in their life. Across the country, we are seeing increases in mental health issues, including dementia, suicide and addictions. We need to feel free to talk about these issues without any stigma and to come up with solutions.

I want to thank the many people in my riding of Sarnia—Lambton who are working hard to help increase services for those living with a mental health illness.

Today, I am asking MPs to join in the mental health conversation through any and all of their social media channels. For every text message, wireless and long distance call made by Bell Canada and Bell Aliant customers, Bell will donate five cents more towards Canadian mental health programs.

Mental health is a serious priority for Canadians, so let's talk.

Mental HealthStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Eva Nassif Liberal Vimy, QC

Mr. Speaker, today, across the country, Canadians are participating in Bell Let's Talk Day. Last year, thanks to everyone who joined in to break the silence on mental health issues, Bell raised nearly $1 million to donate to various organizations. One such organization, La Ressource anxiété et trouble panique, in Laval, was chosen to be a recipient of the Bell Let’s Talk Community Fund in 2019. Last week I was honoured to attend the press conference announcing a $21,000 donation, which will be used to create two support groups for people suffering from anxiety. Once again this year, for every text message and social media post with the hashtag #BellLetsTalk, Bell will donate five cents to various organizations.

Together, let us continue the conversation and make a difference in the lives of Canadians.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister should have fired his ambassador to China as soon as he interfered in an independent legal process. Instead, he showed weakness. He continued to put his trust in his ambassador and allowed him to cause more damage, when Canadians' lives are at stake.

Why did the Prime Minister wait so long to fire his own representative?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

January 30th, 2019 / 2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on China, we will continue to stand up for the rule of law. We will respect our international obligations and we will always put the safety of Canadians first.

I would recommend that the leader of the official opposition not make an issue of a foreign policy decision because he is the one who took a pro-Brexit stand in an extremely divisive situation for the United Kingdom.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that our international partners are quickly losing respect for the Prime Minister, and it is no wonder. After clowning around in India, inviting a convicted terrorist along, he was then forced to accept concession after concession from Donald Trump, all the while managing to anger our partners in Japan and Australia. Now Canadians are paying for his mistakes when it comes to our relationship with China.

Once again, why did he show such weakness and wait so long to fire his own ambassador?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, on China, we will continue to stand up for the rule of law; we will respect our international obligations, and we will always put the safety of Canadians first.

We will take no lessons from the Leader of the Opposition, whose only pronouncement on foreign policy has been to come down on one side of the most divisive, destructive debate to happen in the U.K. for an awfully long time. People will understand that we take no lessons from the Harper Conservatives or from the current Conservative leader on Canada's place in the world.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

The Prime Minister came down on the losing side of that debate in the United Kingdom, Mr. Speaker.

Going back to China, for days the Prime Minister allowed Canada's position to be weakened by having his own personal representative interfere with an independent process, politicizing the issue by giving a briefing in his old political constituency.

Why did it take so long for the Prime Minister to fire his ambassador?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite just did it again: He came down clearly on one side of the most divisive foreign policy debate to hit the United Kingdom in a long time. He even boasted about it, saying that he was pro-Brexit before Brexit was cool.

Quite frankly, we will take no lessons from the members opposite on the matter of Canada's standing in the world and the great work we are doing on foreign policy.

Carbon PricingOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, we will take no lessons from someone who has boasted about admiring the basic dictatorship of China, after seeing what that government has done with Canadians in that country.

It is not just in foreign affairs that the Prime Minister is making Canadians pay for his mistakes. We now know that if allowed to continue, the government will raise the carbon tax drastically after the next election. Based on the government's own figures, the carbon tax could rise as high as $300 per tonne.

Can the Prime Minister tell Canadians, once and for all, what the final—