House of Commons Hansard #388 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was mennonites.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of the national anthem, led by the hon. member for Yellowhead.

[Members sang the national anthem]

SNC-Lavalin EmployeesStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Michel Boudrias Bloc Terrebonne, QC

Mr. Speaker, the SNC-Lavalin crisis is in its third week. All parties are doing their best to make the crisis last as long as possible, not resolve it.

Not once has anyone talked about protecting jobs. Despite its “workers' party” persona, the NDP has not said a word. It is ready to sacrifice 3,000 jobs in Quebec to win seats in British Columbia.

Our Conservative colleagues have not said a word either. They say they are all about the economy, but they are ready to sacrifice a major head office in Montreal so they can spend one more day raking the Prime Minister over the coals.

We have not heard much from the Liberals either. They could resolve this crisis with a remediation agreement, but they are lying low in hopes the storm will pass.

It goes without saying that Quebeckers are not getting the kind of federal representation they deserve when their representatives are willing to hold 3,000 families hostage for weeks just for the sake of engaging in petty partisan politics.

This needs to stop now.

Marie-Anne GabouryStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

MaryAnn Mihychuk Liberal Kildonan—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, this year, Winnipeg's Festival du Voyageur celebrated its 50th anniversary. We came together to commemorate the heroes of the fur trade. Some voices, though, have not been heard, and once again, I stand to bring attention to Canada's first female voyageur: Marie-Anne Gaboury. This remarkable woman broke generations of convention and made her own place in the world. Refusing to stay in Montreal, she joined the fur trade and spent five years travelling across the prairies, then made Winnipeg her home.

Fearlessly trekking through thousands of kilometres of forest and prairie, she hunted bison, traded and heroically saved another voyageur from an attacking grizzly bear. She was remarkably intelligent, learning four languages at a time when few people were literate at all.

She did everything her male colleagues did and more, yet history remembers her only as the grandmother of a famous man. Today I challenge all members to honour her memory and celebrate all the voyageurs who helped build our nation.

AlbertaStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Arnold Viersen Conservative Peace River—Westlock, AB

Mr. Speaker, in 1905, Alberta joined Confederation and quickly became the workhorse of Canada. Our grain fed the hungry, our lumber built homes, and later, our oil provided energy.

Confederation allowed Canada to become a farmer of sorts, harvesting resources from its various plots of land. Sadly, today the farmer has forgotten how to farm. After riding this workhorse through a world recession, Alberta now has a cold. Alberta is suffering under a softwood lumber dispute. Trade negotiations have failed our agricultural producers, and a failure to approve pipelines has forced energy producers out of the province. Alberta, Canada's workhorse, has lost thousands of jobs.

Albertans are overtaxed, and their hands are lassoed by a farmer with blinders on. We have been a willing and able workhorse for decades. Despite that loyalty, it seems like the farmer has led Alberta behind the barn to put an end to the misery. It is time for the farmer to pony up and look after his workhorse. He should call the vet or relinquish the reins.

Steinhart DistilleryStatements By Members

February 27th, 2019 / 2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Sean Fraser Liberal Central Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia's craft distillers are taking on the world. The Steinhart Distillery, in Arisaig, Nova Scotia, just down the road from my childhood home, recently took home the prize for Canada's best classic gin at the 2019 World Gin Awards in London, England.

l have had the pleasure of meeting Thomas Steinhart on many occasions, and he is passionate about the traditional practice he brings to his distilling craft. The Steinhart Distillery makes many varieties of gin and vodka, with distribution across Canada and internationally. His products can even be found at certain events right here on Parliament Hill. As a local representative, it is encouraging to see his work bringing good jobs to a rural community.

I want to congratulate Thomas on this prestigious award and thank him for helping grow our local economy. I encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to pop in and try some of his products the next time they are home. To all the distillers back home in Nova Scotia, I say, “Cheers”.

International Women's DayStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Irene Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, gender equality requires strong social programs that help women thrive, such as affordable housing, health care and pharmacare. It means access to affordable quality child care so that women do not have to choose between having a family and having a career. Gender equality means pay equity for women who can participate in all aspects of life free from the threat of gender-based violence and free to make decisions about their own bodies.

As we celebrate International Women's Day on March 8, let us commit to continuing to work for real and lasting change for women. That is what New Democrats work for each and every day.

SeniorsStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Greg Fergus Liberal Hull—Aylmer, QC

Mr. Speaker, seniors are often left on the sidelines. We are so quick to say that the younger generation is the brightest and most innovative. We tend to forget those who came before us.

Seniors have much to be proud of. They have shaped our country in many ways. They are here to provide a sober reminder of the mistakes of the past, so we do not repeat them.

This is a lesson I have learned through my Hull—Aylmer Senior Council. The council members have challenged me with their insightful views and their willingness to have frank discussions about the future of our country. I thank my council members. They can believe me when I say that our frequent council meetings are one of the highlights of my career as the member of Parliament for Hull—Aylmer.

To any seniors who may be watching, I want to thank them for everything they have done for our country. The government hopes to work closely with them to build a better future.

Citation for LifesavingStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Diane Finley Conservative Haldimand—Norfolk, ON

Mr. Speaker, in an emergency, it is important to stay calm, cool and collected. That is exactly what a bright and brave youngster did recently in my riding. One morning recently, seven-year-old Dylan Roloson, of Simcoe, found his mother, Jessica, who suffers from type 1 diabetes, unconscious. While almost anyone of any age would rightfully be frightened in this kind of situation, Dylan remained calm, cool and collected as he called 911 and explained what was happening until the paramedics arrived.

The EMS on scene praised Dylan for his actions and credited him for saving his mother's life. EMS officials were so impressed with Dylan that they presented him with a plaque of life-saving recognition, on behalf of the OPP interim commissioner, at a special ceremony at his school. Together Dylan and first responders taught a valuable lesson to everyone there about the proper use of 911 and the importance of staying calm, cool and collected during an emergency.

Annual Hudson St. Patrick's Day ParadeStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Schiefke Liberal Vaudreuil—Soulanges, QC

Mr. Speaker, for the past 10 years, an army of volunteers led by Jim Beauchamp and his family, Jay de la Durantaye, Ken Bell, Rob Dumas, Craig Nolan, Brett Nolan and Ken Doran, in partnership with the town of Hudson, has given everyone in the community of Vaudreuil—Soulanges a chance to be Irish for a day during the annual St. Patrick's Day parade in Hudson.

Whether it is sporting a bright green bow tie, celebrating rich Irish culture and heritage or simply enjoying our historic and quaint town of Hudson, there is always a good reason to celebrate St. Patrick's Day in our community. This year, the parade will be led by grand marshal Jamie Orchard, Irishwoman of the Year Brenda O'Farrell, parade queen Samara O'Gorman, princesses Kimberlee O'Brien and Emma Gauthier, and queen mum Janet Ellerbeck on March 16, at 1 p.m., on Main Street. I invite members to come one, come all, and let us make the 10th anniversary of the Hudson St. Patrick's Day Parade one to remember.

Sláinte, Mr. Speaker.

TransportationStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Vance Badawey Liberal Niagara Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, on February 20, I had the pleasure to table the interim report on establishing a Canadian transportation and logistics strategy. The 31 recommendations contained within the report are to promote the free movement of goods and people domestically and over international borders. It is easy to see how this fluidity could positively affect local, domestic and international business interests. Equally important is to recognize how it will impact individual citizens: Canadians.

In Niagara Centre, I look forward to working with our partners to strengthen our economy, aligning with international investment opportunities and promoting the best use of Niagara's transportation-related assets.

This report reinforces strategic, integrated transportation priorities within Niagara and will align with future capital investments. This will strengthen Niagara's overall global trade performance and will therefore provide and sustain good, stable jobs throughout our region.

Government ProgramsStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Todd Doherty Conservative Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, my constituents in Cariboo—Prince George, and indeed all Canadians, are paying for this Prime Minister's mistakes. In a recent survey, half of Canadians admitted that they are having trouble just making ends meet. It is no wonder. Despite what the Liberals say, under this Prime Minister, 2018 finished with wages that are flat and household debt that is climbing.

Amid layoffs and plant closures in our energy, forestry and auto sectors, it is clear that this Prime Minister has failed workers. Worse, the only thing going up for residents in my riding of Cariboo—Prince George are taxes. This Prime Minister, who has never had to worry about money, is happy to let the fine people of Cariboo—Prince George pay for his failures. Payroll taxes are up, and the Prime Minister's carbon tax is driving up the cost of fuel and home heating.

Canadians just cannot afford another Liberal term. Why should they pay for the Liberals' mistakes, when they can choose Conservative leadership? The Conservatives are fighting for better.

Black History MonthStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Eyking Liberal Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, as February is Black History Month, I would like to recognize some great Canadians from Whitney Pier, Cape Breton.

Clotilda Yakimchuk overcame discrimination by becoming one of the first Nova Scotia black nurses and started Cape Breton University's nursing program.

Vincent Waterman is a true human rights activist and patriarch of St. Phillip's African Orthodox Church. He served his family, his community and a greater world tirelessly for years.

Then there is Campy Crawford. He became the first black municipal police officer east of Montreal in 1964. Because of his great work, the regional police have a service award dedicated in his name.

Last but not least, a former steelworker, alderman and deputy mayor of Sydney, Eddie Parris, was an advocate for Cape Breton's black community and even had a chance to play for the Queen, in his band, the Inspirational Singers.

Let us never forget the true contributions of African Canadians, not only in Cape Breton but throughout our wonderful country.

Nuclear Power PlantsStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Kim Rudd Liberal Northumberland—Peterborough South, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the Canadian Nuclear Association conference taking place in Ottawa.

Nuclear power plants have been producing clean, emissions-free electricity in Canada since the early 1960s and now produce about 15% of Canada's electricity and 60% in the province of Ontario.

Today, Canada is an international tier 1 nuclear supplier, recognized for some of the newest innovation in design, life-saving isotopes, hydrogen as a clean power source and small modular reactors, recognizing their potential for, among other things, addressing climate change and supplying unlimited clean power to rural and remote communities.

Members of the CNA, like Cameco Fuel Manufacturing in my riding of Northumberland—Peterborough South, are at the cutting edge of technology and innovation and lead the way in promoting this critical sector of the Canadian economy.

I have been privileged to work with the CNA over the last few years. Its advocacy in the commitment to a course of excellence do us all proud.

Carbon PricingStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Rob Nicholson Conservative Niagara Falls, ON

Mr. Speaker, amid a mounting list of failures, the Prime Minister's 2019 carbon tax is just the beginning of what he wants Canadians to pay. Experts agree that it will not be effective and will only lead to economic hardship for Canadians.

The Prime Minister's carbon tax will add 11¢ to the cost of every litre of gas and hundreds more for home heating. Despite false assurances that it will not add up to much, independent analysis estimates the cost to be up to $100 more per month. This is yet another area where the Prime Minister needs to come clean with Canadians. Canadians should not be punished with an ineffective tax for working, playing and living. Worse yet, the Liberal carbon tax will go even higher.

The Prime Minister does not worry about money or deficits, but that is not the case for most Canadians. Hundreds of dollars in added costs per year matters to most of us. In October, we have a clear choice. The Conservatives will ensure that Canadians get ahead instead of falling behind.

BullyingStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Emmanuella Lambropoulos Liberal Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, bullying is a serious problem in our schools and workplaces, as well as at home and online.

As a teacher, I have seen the effects of bullying first-hand. While one might think that for most kids recess and lunch are their favourite times of the day, kids who are bullied dread time outside of the classroom because they are afraid of not having anyone to speak to, of looking like they have no friends, of being bullied.

Kids who are bullied experience depression and anxiety, difficulty sleeping, increased feelings of loneliness and sadness, and diminished school performance.

Bullying causes kids to stop going to class and may even cause them to drop out.

February 27 is known as Pink Shirt Day, an opportunity to raise awareness about bullying, discrimination, homophobia and transphobia. As the Pink Shirt Day movement grows each year, join me in taking a stand against bullying. People should wear their pink shirts proudly and let everyone know they do not tolerate bullying or discrimination.

We need to show kindness, empathy and compassion. Most importantly, we need to speak out against bullying all year round.

Leader of the New Democratic PartyStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Peter Julian NDP New Westminster—Burnaby, BC

Mr. Speaker, Jagmeet Singh. I have raised the name of the national NDP leader in the House of Commons dozens of times and each time the Liberals have responded with a taunt: Jagmeet who?

Everyone in Burnaby South knows full well who Jagmeet Singh is and that is why they elected him MP with an overwhelming mandate Monday night. In just three sitting days, I will not even be able to use his name anymore because he will be sitting in the House of Commons.

Jagmeet who? He is a political leader like we have never seen before in Canada, someone who has fought through racism and discrimination and always has the utmost respect for everyone. Above all, Jagmeet Singh is a fighter. He will be fighting for the people of Burnaby South and all Canadians, for affordable housing now, for universal single-payer public pharmacare and for real meaningful and lasting reconciliation with first nations, Métis and Inuit peoples.

Jagmeet who? Canadians will see him in action in the House on March 18, speaking up about building a Canada where everyone matters and where no one is left behind. I congratulate Jagmeet.

EthicsStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, right now, tens of thousands of Canadians are out of work because of the no more pipelines bill, the tanker ban, failure to build pipelines and failure to resolve tariffs with the United States.

Canada's borders are not secure and are our asylum system is being abused. Canadians are still detained in China. Taxes are going up, and Canada's debt is out of control.

Instead of fighting for Canada, the Prime Minister has been fighting for who—himself. He has taken an illegal trip to billionaire's island, has allowed a lucrative clam fishing contract to be directly awarded to an in-law of his minister, has had caucus embroiled in investigations on shady land deals in Brampton, four groping scandals, including himself.

Now, the Prime Minister is accused of conspiring to prevent justice being brought to rich executives accused of bribing Moammar Gadhafi's son with prostitutes. It is disgusting.

Canadians are standing up to say “Enough is enough.” We stand with them against the Prime Minister, because Canada's Conservatives are fighting for better.

Black History MonthStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Bob Bratina Liberal Hamilton East—Stoney Creek, ON

Mr. Speaker, my city of Hamilton is home to an active francophone community, which recently held its 6th annual Black History Month Gala. This event was a celebration of our diversity, with 20 francophone African countries represented.

It was a wonderful evening showcasing the culture, music, dance, fashion and renowned joie de vivre of the African people. I had the pleasure of sharing a statement from the Prime Minister, who said that we are celebrating young black Canadians, their power, their voices, their achievements and their future. He also said that this month reminds us of the inequality and barriers many continue to face.

Canadian Heritage will invest $9 million over three years to help address issues faced by black youth, to foster a better understanding of their experiences and to facilitate dialogue between all Canadians.

JusticeOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister claims that he is pleased that the former attorney general can share her perspective on SNC-Lavalin. Now we know why. He is still dictating what she can and cannot say about this Liberal corruption scandal.

If the Prime Minister has nothing to hide, why is he still trying to silence the former attorney general?

JusticeOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, it is important for Canadians to hear different perspectives on this matter.

We announced that, where appropriate, we are waiving solicitor-client privilege, cabinet confidentiality and all other obligations of confidentiality with respect to the matters being studied by the justice committee and the Conflict of Interest Commissioner.

We want the committee to continue its important work. We support the work of this committee and, of course, the work of the Conflict of Interest Commissioner.

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, that is what the Prime Minister would like Canadians to believe, but the facts tell otherwise. He is refusing to let his former attorney general share her entire story.

Here is what she had to say yesterday, “the Order in Council leaves in place whatever restraints there are on my ability to speak freely about matters that occurred after I left the post of Attorney General.”

What happened between the time she was removed as attorney general to the day that she resigned that the Prime Minister is so desperate to keep hidden?

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we took the unprecedented step of waiving both cabinet confidentiality and solicitor-client privilege in the matter currently under study by the justice committee and the Ethics Commissioner. This is a significant step that we took. We know that Canadians need to hear different perspectives on this matter. That is why we welcome the work the committee is doing and we welcome the work the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner is doing on this matter.

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Check the fine print, Mr. Speaker, because there is an important detail that the Prime Minister is leaving out. Something happened between the time the former attorney general lost her job for speaking truth to power until the day she resigned from cabinet that the Prime Minister is desperate to keep hidden from Canadians.

Could the Prime Minister confirm that sometime in that period of time something was said to the former attorney general that proved she lost her job because she stood up to him?

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we take very seriously the matter before the justice committee and indeed the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner. That is why, as a government, we were determined to take the unprecedented step of waiving cabinet confidentiality, of waiving solicitor-client privilege, which allows the former attorney general to speak fully to the matter in question. This is something that Canadians expect. They want to be able to hear different perspectives on this matter and that is exactly what they are going to get to hear.

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals were dragged kicking and screaming to the justice committee before they even started to allow people to give testimony. They are still only allowing half the story to be told, the half of the story the Prime Minister is comfortable hearing.

There is more to this story. Something happened. Something was said to the former attorney general or someone in the Prime Minister's Office validated her accusations that she lost her job because she would not let his friends off the hook. Is that why the Prime Minister will not waive full privilege in this matter?