House of Commons Hansard #399 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was including.

Topics

The BudgetStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Sean Casey Liberal Charlottetown, PE

Madam Speaker, desk-thumping and a filibuster have impeded the opportunity of Prince Edward Islanders to hear just how good budget 2019 is for our province.

There was $10 billion in new dollars to tackle the national housing crunch, including in Charlottetown; $16.5 million from the federal gas tax, going directly to island municipalities for infrastructure; $50.8 million for public safety housing in Charlottetown to assist those with complex mental, physical and social challenges; and increased operational funding for the Confederation Centre of the Arts, which showcases Canadian talent, including the iconic Anne of Green Gables.

To quote the late great Premier Joe Ghiz, Islanders have endured 10 long, hard, lean, mean, miserly, miserable Tory years, but no more. Budget 2019 is very good for the mighty island. Members do not need to take my word for it. They can hop on one of the two new ferries announced in the budget and see for themselves.

Carbon PricingStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Conservative

Arnold Viersen Conservative Peace River—Westlock, AB

Madam Speaker, while Liberal elites fawn over the imposition of the carbon tax, everyday Canadians are hurting under this tax grab that will do nothing to clean up our environment.

My constituents work hard every day to make ends meet. They do not need higher gas prices, higher home heating bills and higher grocery prices just so Liberal elites can feel better.

The Liberal carbon tax has raised the price of everything that my constituents do: driving to work, heading to hockey practice or buying groceries to feed their families.

The Conservatives believe in conserving and protecting our environment for future generations. This is why we believe that heavy emitters should do their part, not just every day Canadians. Unfortunately, the government has exempted them from its carbon tax. The truth about the carbon tax is that it is not an environmental plan; it is just a tax grab.

Hull—AylmerStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Greg Fergus Liberal Hull—Aylmer, QC

Madam Speaker, tax season is upon us, and I am pleased to offer free tax clinics for the people of Hull—Aylmer for the second year in a row. During the months of March and April, volunteers and my team have helped nearly 250 modest income earners fill out their tax returns.

I want to thank our volunteers for 2019, namely Suzanne, Lynn, Wilmer, Jocelyn, Pierre, Charles, Albert and Sophie.

I thank them very much for their hard work. Because of them, 250 families in Hull—Aylmer will get benefits such as the Canada child benefit and the working income tax benefit, which will them make ends meet and give them a better chance to improve their lives.

I am very proud to be part of a government that is working as hard as Canadians to help Canadian families.

Labrador Winter GamesStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Liberal

Yvonne Jones Liberal Labrador, NL

Madam Speaker, I am proud to rise today to congratulate the athletes, volunteers and sponsors who made the Labrador Winter Games a true success.

The games have been a premier event in Labrador since 1983, and I have fond memories of my times competing as an athlete and of being a spectator. The event continues to be the largest gathering and celebration for sports and culture in Labrador. It is often referred to as the “Olympics of the North“ and comprises both modern and traditional sporting events.

In 2019, we saw the first female Labrathon event, an event reserved only for males until now. Women competed in traditional clothing, pulled a komatik on snowshoes and competed to light a fire, saw a log, target shoot and chop a hole through the ice.

I congratulate Nikki Brown-Dyson of Cartwright, the first woman to hold this title at the games. I also acknowledge and ask my colleagues in the House today to join me in congratulating all teams and the team of Happy Valley Goose Bay, which won the cup.

Carbon PricingStatements By Members

11:05 a.m.

Scot Davidson York—Simcoe, CPC

Madam Speaker, this week the Liberal carbon tax kicked in, making the price of gas, groceries and home heating more expensive for the people of York—Simcoe and for Canadians all across our great country.

Families, seniors and students are all paying the price for the government's out-of-control spending. The carbon tax means they will have to work even harder just to make ends meet.

Instead of funding environmental policies that will actually help people, like the Lake Simcoe clean-up fund it cancelled, the Liberal government is exempting the worst polluters, while making the average Canadian family pay over $540 more per year. The people of York—Simcoe have been clear. They want the carbon tax scrapped.

Canada's Conservatives will repeal this tax on everything and put more money back in the pockets of Canadians. We will do all this and ensure the environment is protected for future generations.

Quebec Breast Cancer Foundation EventsStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Jean-Claude Poissant Liberal La Prairie, QC

Madam Speaker, a special event is being held tomorrow evening in my riding, Candiac. About 300 people will attend the 10th annual Soirée Victoire to raise money for breast cancer research and ultimately to find a cure.

Founded by Danielle Simard and Mario Cecchini, the Événements Victoire have been quite the success story. Since 2009, no less than 15 events, including 10 Soirées Victoire, have been organized, raising $920,000. There is no doubt that with tomorrow's gala we will hit the million-dollar mark. This money will be donated to the Quebec breast cancer foundation. How amazing is that?

This is a great outcome, and I am pleased to announce that these efforts are producing tangible results. Statistics show that if the trend continues, we will have a cure within a generation. Today, 88% of women recover from breast cancer.

In closing, I want to thank Mrs. Simard and Mr. Cecchini for everything they do. They give hope to all women diagnosed with breast cancer.

Terry Fox Research InstituteStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Pam Damoff Liberal Oakville North—Burlington, ON

Madam Speaker, in 1980, Terry Fox united our country with a vision to one day find a cure for cancer. When his cancer returned, Terry said, “I’m not going to give up. But I might not make it...if I don’t, the Marathon of Hope better continue.”

Budget 2019 continues Terry's dream by allocating up to $150 million toward the creation of the Marathon of Hope Cancer Centres Network. The federal government will collaborate with the Terry Fox Research Institute and its partners, who are providing matching funding to link universities and hospitals across Canada to advance the principles of precision medicine and transform how cancer research is done, not only in Canada but around the world.

On April 12, the Terry Fox Research Institute will present its road map to cure cancer by announcing its vision at the exact spot where Terry started his run 39 years ago in Newfoundland. I am extremely proud of this investment to one day realize Terry's dream.

Access to InformationStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Conservative

Bernard Généreux Conservative Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, QC

Madam Speaker, the Prime Minister can no longer hide the truth about the SNC-Lavalin case.

The Prime Minister says that he has accepted his share of responsibility for the breach of trust, but he is still in power. Two members of his team resigned to deflect attention; one MP was intimidated to the point that she resigned, and two others were expelled because they dared tell the truth.

Any other organization would question his ability to lead. However, the 176 members of the Liberal caucus are following the leader and defending the indefensible. The media have lost patience with the Prime Minister, who used to be their darling.

Following an access to information request, the Privy Council told La Presse that it will not receive a response until November 2019, even though the law provides for a response within 30 days.

Clearly, the Liberals want to prevent the truth from coming out before the election. There is a reason why they are urging senators to adopt Bill C-58, which will let them say that such a request is vexatious or made in bad faith. They hope to bury the truth forever.

Access to InformationStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

The Assistant Deputy Speaker NDP Carol Hughes

The hon. member for Sudbury.

Yukon's Mount WoodStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

Liberal

Paul Lefebvre Liberal Sudbury, ON

Madam Speaker, Pascale Marceau was born and raised in my riding of Sudbury. Last month, Pascale was the first woman documented to summit Mount Wood in Yukon, Canada's sixth-highest peak at nearly 16,000 feet, in a winter ascent. She embarked on this daring exploit through the Royal Canadian Geographical Society flag expedition.

The fate of Pascale and her partner's climb was threatened by high winds and a storm on the horizon. Through it all, the now Canmore resident was able to circumvent all the obstacles as she remained calm and persisted to finally reach the top and make history. She will now go down in the books as the first woman to summit a major subarctic peak in winter. What an accomplishment.

Pascale, I congratulate you on your perseverance and the passion you have shown with this daring exploit. You have inspired many young people from Sudbury and across Canada, who try to push the limits and achieve the impossible.

Thank you, Pascale, for being an outstanding role model.

Climate ChangeStatements By Members

11:10 a.m.

NDP

Hélène Laverdière NDP Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Madam Speaker, the Environment Canada report released this week is extremely worrisome. Canada is warming at twice the global average, and things are even worse in the north.

Meanwhile, the commissioner of the environment and sustainable development confirmed what we already know: the government is not doing enough to combat climate change. We also learned this week that the Liberals took $50 million from a green fund to subsidize the oil industry.

The government cannot keep acting as though nothing is happening. It cannot keep subsidizing the oil industry. It cannot claim to be a champion of the environment and then buy a pipeline with taxpayer money instead of investing heavily in the economy of the future. The environment must be our top priority. Talk is not enough. We need action.

Humboldt BroncosStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Kelly Block Conservative Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, SK

Madam Speaker, one year ago, tragedy touched Humboldt, Saskatchewan, our nation and the families and friends of 29 of our own. The Humboldt Broncos accident left a wound that has yet to heal. Perhaps for some, it never truly will.

Our thoughts turn to the families of the players and staff and to the survivors recovering from their injuries, both seen and unseen. To them, we say that they are not forgotten. In the past year, with the attention of the world upon them, they have borne the burden of grief with grace. The grieving most face in private, they have faced in public and they have allowed us to share in their sorrow. None of us can truly understand the weight this placed on their shoulders. Their strength inspired a nation and it continues to inspire.

We have not forgotten. We still remember each of them in our prayers. We still remember Humboldt Strong. Still, we are all Broncos.

Royal Canadian Air ForceStatements By Members

11:15 a.m.

Liberal

Darren Fisher Liberal Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Madam Speaker, on this 95th anniversary of the Royal Canadian Air Force, I am rising to honour the tremendous service and sacrifice of its great women and men. Through two world wars, they have and continue to play a crucial role in defending Canada, our sovereignty and our international security.

At home, these women and men protect our air space through NORAD and conduct vital search and rescue operations. On the world stage, they support NATO operations via air policing missions in Romania. They contribute to international peacekeeping with our helicopters in Mali.

On this anniversary, I also want to highlight our commitment to modernizing the Royal Canadian Air Force. We are acquiring 88 modern fighter jets to replace the CF-18 fleet through an open and transparent competition, something the Conservatives could not do in 10 years. This competition will ensure that we get the right aircraft for our air force, and at the right price, while creating job opportunities for Canada's middle class and those working hard to join it.

JusticeOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Madam Speaker, the Prime Minister looked 37 million Canadians in the eye and said, “If anyone, including the former attorney general, had issues with anything they might have experienced in this government or didn't feel that we were living up to the high standards we set for itself, it was her responsibility to come forward, it was their responsibility to come forward, and no one did.”

This week the Prime Minister admitted that this statement was false, that in fact his former attorney general looked him in the eye and warned him against politically interfering in the SNC-Lavalin prosecution.

Now that we know the Prime Minister stated this public falsehood, will he allow the ethics committee to investigate what others he might have told in this affair?

JusticeOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, we agree that Canadians should be able to hear the truth for themselves. That is exactly why the Prime Minister provided an unprecedented waiver. He waived solicitor-client privilege as well as cabinet confidence to satisfy the parameters that the justice committee put forward.

We recognize that it is important that the justice committee and all committees be able to do their important work, and that is why the members that represent the government on those committees make their own decisions. That is obviously not the approach of the Conservatives.

JusticeOral Questions

11:15 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Madam Speaker, former PMO puppet master and best friend to the Prime Minister showed up before the justice committee and claimed that there was no conversation whatsoever about the inappropriateness of the Prime Minister's political interference in the SNC-Lavalin affair in September, in October, in November and in December, yet now we have 41 pages of journal entries, text messages and audio recordings that show there was nothing but conversation about that political interference. It is documented.

Given that this former PMO puppet master lied before the justice committee, will the Liberals allow the ethics committee to investigate what other falsehoods the government might have told?

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, what is important to note is why this information that the member is referring to is in public. It is because the Prime Minister waived solicitor-client privilege, as well as cabinet confidence.

We recognize that Canadians should be able to hear the truth for themselves, and that is why justice committee meetings took place in public. We know that for over five weeks, justice committee members asked for witnesses to appear. We know that witnesses appeared and answered questions to ensure that Canadians could hear for themselves. This information was made public.

If the Prime Minister had not waived solicitor-client privilege, that would not be the case.

JusticeOral Questions

April 5th, 2019 / 11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre Conservative Carleton, ON

Madam Speaker, the journal entries, text messages and audio recordings show that at least 12 top government officials, including the Prime Minister himself, interfered in the criminal prosecution of SNC-Lavalin, yet only two have appeared. Their appearances were so disastrous that both of them have had to resign from their jobs.

The remaining 10 have not been called upon to answer for the interference we know they engaged in as a result of documented records proving it. Will the government allow the ethics committee to continue an investigation that will bring them all forward?

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, there is a redundancy to the questions, as with the information being provided.

It is important to note why that information is being made public. That information is being made public because the Prime Minister acknowledges and recognizes that Canadians should get to hear the truth for themselves. That is exactly why he waived solicitor-client privilege as well as cabinet confidence: so that when witnesses appeared at the justice committee, they would be able to answer and provide the truth to Canadians for Canadians to hear.

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Madam Speaker, yesterday Liberal Party henchmen leaked information to the media about the former attorney general's so-called conditions for returning to the Liberal caucus, including assurances that her decision on SNC-Lavalin would stand. Yesterday at 10:30 p.m., CBC set the record straight, reporting that the condition was discussed while she was still a minister. That changes everything. This morning, analyst Jonathan Trudeau commented that the Liberals messed up their attempt to spin the story to make the former attorney general look bad.

Why is the government being so gutless?

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, we know the Conservatives keep mixing things up, but they are not interested in listening to testimony.

We know members of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights asked to hear from witnesses. The witnesses appeared and testified. Now all the facts are out in the open. The facts are out in the open because the Prime Minister waived solicitor-client privilege and cabinet confidence. This was the first time in Canadian history that a prime minister did so.

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Madam Speaker, there is a double standard here. Certain individuals were allowed to testify before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights twice, but the former attorney general was allowed to testify only once.

Yes, the Prime Minister let the former attorney general talk about certain things, but only regarding a limited time period. With respect to certain delicate situations in particular, the former attorney general was not allowed to speak her truth or talk about how she experienced certain facts.

Why will the government still not allow the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics to do its work and really get to the bottom of this Liberal scandal involving SNC-Lavalin?

JusticeOral Questions

11:20 a.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Madam Speaker, that is not true. The members of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights decided themselves to hear from witnesses on this matter and they set the parameters of the discussion. To ensure that witnesses could appear and answer questions, the Prime Minister waived solicitor-client privilege and cabinet confidence to meet the parameters set by the committee members.

JusticeOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

NDP

Matthew Dubé NDP Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Madam Speaker, yesterday the member for Markham—Stouffville reminded us of a very important fact. Despite what the Liberals claim, the independence of the judicial system is at the heart of the scandal involving the Prime Minister's Office.

She said, and I quote, “I chose the truth. I chose to act on principles that are so important to the future of our country. That's more important than my political career.”

Can the Minister of Justice assure us that there will be no political interference in this decision and that he will not reverse the decision made by the director of public prosecutions in favour of a wealthy, well-connected corporation?

JusticeOral Questions

11:25 a.m.

Arif Virani Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and to the Minister of Democratic Institutions, Lib.

Madam Speaker, I appreciate the question from the member opposite.

What I can do is share what the two witnesses said about this at the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

It is the fact that we have institutions, that the prosecution is unfolding as it should. The member for Vancouver Granville went to great lengths to underscore that in this case and in all cases, the institutions are doing what they should and the rule of law remains intact.