House of Commons Hansard #407 of the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

2 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

It being Wednesday, we will now have the singing of O Canada, led by the hon. member for Sherbrooke.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Anti-SemitismStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Marco Mendicino Liberal Eglinton—Lawrence, ON

Mr. Speaker, on this solemn day of Yom HaShoah, we remember the six million Jews who were murdered in the Holocaust. It is a fitting and sobering occasion to acknowledge the B’nai Brith's annual audit on anti-Semitism, which reported that over 2,000 incidents involving anti-Semitism were committed in 2018, the highest number in decades.

Anti-Semitism was widespread and visible. There were violent attacks around the world, indiscriminately, seemingly anywhere, from synagogues to public markets to out in the streets.

The unspeakable attacks in synagogues in Pittsburgh and San Diego, where victims were targeted solely because they were Jewish, are absolutely reprehensible. We grieve for the victims and their families.

In Canada, we are not immune. We see the world's oldest hate take many forms in bullying, in harassment, in violence online and in our communities. It must stop.

I commend B’nai Brith for its work. We should all read the audit. We must learn from it. We must stand together in fighting anti-Semitism and all forms of hate and say, united, “Never again.”

Multiple SclerosisStatements By Members

2 p.m.

Conservative

Kerry Diotte Conservative Edmonton Griesbach, AB

Mr. Speaker, today I am wearing a carnation to promote MS Awareness Month. Every day, 11 Canadians are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

For me, fighting MS is personal. My dear friend Ted Marianix had it. He died four years ago. Ted was special. He used to scooter to get around, but he was constantly at my side on my political campaigns. Now I am on his campaign to help find a cure for MS.

People would be surprised at how many live with MS. One is Aaron Solowoniuk, the drummer for the band Billy Talent. Aaron says he suffered blurred vision, numbness, extreme fatigue and depression, but he considers himself lucky, because he has what he calls a flexible work environment. Many Canadians with MS have to miss work or lose their jobs.

Therefore, I am happy that the human resources committee is recommending that the government enact policies that would help those with MS and other episodic disabilities.

Today, let us remember the Canadians who live with MS. Together, we can find a cure.

Governance in NunavutStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Independent

Hunter Tootoo Independent Nunavut, NU

Mr. Speaker, when Nunavut was created, Inuit opted for a public government, full of hope that they would have the support of the federal government to build a place where we could live and prosper.

Fast forward 20 years, and the Government of Nunavut remains chronically underfunded, starved from the resources it needs to cope with issues and create a sustainable economy.

In many ways, life for Inuit is worse. Severely overcrowded housing has led to an alarming increase in TB, youth suicide rates are the highest in Canada and Inuit continue to live in third world conditions.

Canada is bypassing the Government of Nunavut in favour of side deals with ITK, funding it to come up with strategies to deal with these crises. ITK is a third party in all of this. It does not deliver programs and services to Inuit in Nunavut; the Government of Nunavut does.

To recap, Inuit in Nunavut are living in third world conditions, Canada is funding a third party to deal with the situation, and the Government of Nunavut, struggling to deliver programs and services, is sidelined.

What is wrong with this picture?

Sri Lankan Civil WarStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mark Holland Liberal Ajax, ON

Mr. Speaker, nearly a decade ago, in Mullivaikkal, Sri Lanka, a brutal civil war lasting nearly 30 years came to a horrific end.

A United Nations report found that 40,000 civilians may have been killed in the final months of that civil war, mostly as a result of indiscriminate shelling by the Sri Lankan military. Families and communities were ripped apart, and the legacy of that brutality still haunts victims and peace-loving people everywhere. The widespread allegations of atrocities and human rights violations, including war crimes and genocide, devastate us. Ten years later, we recognize and remember the horrors that occurred and renew our vow to find justice and reconciliation for the victims.

What happened in Mullivaikkal must never happen again—not in Sri Lanka, not anywhere. We must do all we can to make sure that is certain.

Status of WomenStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Sheri Benson NDP Saskatoon West, SK

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to join with first nations women's groups and first nations women across Canada to once again call on the government to end gender discrimination in the Indian Act.

For decades, the Government of Canada has been causing undue harm to first nations women by removing or denying their status simply because they are not first nations men. This past January, the United Nations Human Rights Committee said that Canada is still discriminating against first nations women and their descendants by denying first nations women the same entitlements under the Indian Act as first nations men. This discrimination causes women to be disconnected from their communities, breaks up families and causes greater disparity in the rights and benefits accorded to first nations women and men.

It is beyond the time for the government to act on the calls from first nations women and the organizations they represent. I call on the government to act immediately on Bill S-3 and do everything within its power to end the discrimination against first nations women in Canada.

Lifetime Achievement AwardStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Wayne Easter Liberal Malpeque, PE

Mr. Speaker, I rise to congratulate Boyd MacDonald of Crapaud, P.E.I., who was honoured recently by the Prince County Horsemen's Club with the Philip and Henry Doucette Memorial Lifetime Achievement Award.

Boyd started his own horse stable in 1971 and gained his licence to drive horses two years later. He had over 1,000 race wins, all with his own horses. That is a feat very few ever achieve, but the bumps and bruises of horse racing never slowed him down.

Boyd and his wife Claire, now 61 years married, also were successful farmers, establishing Boyd MacDonald Produce Ltd., which is still operating as a produce broker today. Starting his potato business by borrowing a neighbour's truck and hauling potatoes in the evening, he grew the business to two warehouses, employed over 20 people and grew 350 acres of those good Island spuds.

Congratulations to Boyd on a well-deserved award, and for his outstanding contribution to the community and life on the Island.

Blyth FestivalStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Ben Lobb Conservative Huron—Bruce, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Blyth Festival has been a mainstay for theatre-lovers in Huron—Bruce for 45 years, and in that time the festival has premiered 134 Canadian productions written, directed, designed and performed by Canadians for Canadians.

Blyth is literally home to some of the best original Canadian content in the country. Dozens of these productions have gone on to be produced all around the world. However, the Blyth Festival has never performed here in Ottawa—until now. The Blyth Festival is premiering The Pigeon King at the National Arts Centre, and it will be here until May 5.

People can get tickets and support local arts, or better yet, plan a trip to Blyth this summer and watch the best Canadian plays the country has to offer.

We thank our artists, production, volunteers and donors for their continued belief and commitment in Blyth.

SeniorsStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Yves Robillard Liberal Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, QC

Mr. Speaker, last week I had the pleasure of meeting with a few seniors in my riding, Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, at Domaine des Forges and Manoir Thérèse-Casgrain. During our discussions, they shared their concerns for the future, but they also told me how pleased they were with everything we have done for seniors.

Many of them could not hide their enthusiasm about the new horizons for seniors program. With nearly 2,000 community-based projects funded by our government in 2019, this program is already producing results, bringing our seniors' communities to life. I would like to thank the Minister of Seniors for her work on this file.

Our seniors can be proud of their government, which knows how to look after Canadians in their golden years.

Status of WomenStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Jennifer O'Connell Liberal Pickering—Uxbridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, on International Women's Day, I asked members of our community to nominate outstanding women to be honoured at my first annual Pink Tea, inspired by the Famous Five's Pink Tea parties. Pink Tea parties embodied hyperfemininity to disguise the fact that women were discussing politics and strategies to move gender equality forward in Canada.

This past weekend, I was fortunate to be surrounded by women who are continuing to do similar work right here in my community. From a 15-year-old CEO to a human trafficking survivor, now advocate to the first female mayor of Uxbridge and to the chair of Durham region, these women and their stories are inspiring not only me and our community, but Canadians across the country.

As they continue to advocate for changes they hope to see, I am empowered to continue this work in the House of Commons in order to make Pickering—Uxbridge and all of Canada a more inclusive place.

AnaphylaxisStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Lisa Raitt Conservative Milton, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in recognition of May as our national food allergy and anaphylaxis awareness month.

Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that can be life-threatening. Food is one of the most common causes, but insect stings, medicine, fragrances or even exercise can also cause a reaction.

Anaphylaxis affects 2.8 million Canadians. That is one in 13 Canadians, half of whom are under the age of 35. Indeed, over half a million students are affected by anaphylaxis, about two students for every classroom.

The month of May will shine a light on the challenges of safely navigating life-threatening allergies. Let us all join together in support of our allergic friends, family, colleagues, classmates and neighbours by learning how to recognize the early signs of a reaction and how to administer an EpiPen.

It is as simple this: blue to the sky, orange to the thigh, and call 911.

Violence Against WomenStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Terry Duguid Liberal Winnipeg South, MB

Mr. Speaker, in the 1970s, women suffering from violence were too often forced to live in fear for their own safety and for the safety of their children. A brave and determined group of women did something about it. With no money and little support, Ardis Beaudry, Janet Currie, Thérèse Dallaire-Laplante, Nicole Thauvette, Lorraine Kenaschuk, Natalie McBride and Lynn Zimmer founded the first women's shelters in Canada. The stories of these women, who are being honoured in Ottawa this week, were captured in Margo Goodhand's wonderful book, Runaway Wives and Rogue Feminists.

Today there are over 550 women's shelters in Canada, a great testament to these incredible pioneers, who believed that society had a duty to intervene and led the way. We all owe these amazing women our gratitude.

CancerStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Jean Yip Liberal Scarborough—Agincourt, ON

Mr. Speaker, although April was Daffodil Month for the Canadian Cancer Society, cancer is not limited to one month. We do not forget cancer or our loved ones, like my late husband, Arnold, or those who are living with it.

One in two Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer, which is why the 2019 budget commitment on cancer research and treatment is so important. We are investing in organizations like the Terry Fox Research Institute to establish a Marathon of Hope cancer centre network across Canada; Ovarian Cancer Canada to help with prevention, screening and treatment for ovarian cancer; and Genome Canada for large-scale research competitions and projects to help with transformative scientific breakthroughs.

We need to eradicate cancer once and for all.

Quebec PipelinesStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, every day, 50,000 Quebeckers work in the petrochemical industry. Whether they work in plastics, composites, research or refineries, these people create wealth in Quebec. The safest, greenest and most economical way to transport the oil is by pipeline. Quebeckers know all about pipelines.

Quebec's first pipeline was built in 1942. We now have 2,000 kilometres of pipeline. Nine pipelines run under the St. Lawrence. Four million litres of jet fuel are transported to the Dorval airport by pipeline. In 2012, a brand-new pipeline was built from Lévis to Montreal and it is 248 kilometres long and crosses 26 rivers, including the St. Lawrence.

It all works so well that no one talks about it. Yes, Quebec has pipelines and we are proud of them.

Motorcycle safety Awareness MonthStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Doug Eyolfson Liberal Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia—Headingley, MB

Mr. Speaker, today marks the beginning of Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. As a motorcyclist, I regularly ride my Triumph Bonneville down Portage Avenue and take part in Ride For Dad, an event in support of prostate cancer research. However, as an emergency room physician, I am also familiar with the tragedies that come with motorcycle collisions. Many of these collisions can be prevented, and we can all help.

This month we are reminded of how we can do our part in helping to keep the 700,000 Canadian motorcycle riders safe. I am proud that our government is committed to taking steps to ensure that all Canadian road users always ride safe, but we must all do our part. Let us remember to encourage riders to wear the proper protective gear and to encourage motorcycle riders and automobile drivers to always look twice and check blind spots before switching lanes.

I want to thank the organizations that advocate for road safety every day, such as the Motorcyclists Confederation of Canada. Through advocacy around Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, we are reminded this month, and every month, to ride safe.

Multiple Sclerosis Awareness MonthStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Don Davies NDP Vancouver Kingsway, BC

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of Canada's New Democrats, I am honoured to rise today to recognize May as Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month. Canada has one of the highest rates of MS in the world. On average, 11 Canadians are diagnosed every day.

When a person receives an MS diagnosis, there is an immediate impact on all who love them. Indeed, my own family has known the devastating impact of multiple sclerosis.

Canada must do more to improve the quality of life for people living with MS and to ultimately find a cure. We must ensure that all patients receive affordable access to treatment, housing that meets their needs, comprehensive home care and age appropriate long-term care. We must also provide flexible employment conditions and improved income support for people living with MS.

Throughout this month, I urge all Parliamentarians to help raise awareness and act now to improve life for the over 77,000 Canadians living with multiple sclerosis. Together we will find a cure.

Scarborough SouthwestStatements By Members

May 1st, 2019 / 2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Erin O'Toole Conservative Durham, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am privileged to rise to speak about a great Canadian and friend. After a couple of years of working for our intelligence service, Kimberly Fawcett joined the Canadian Armed Forces and gave 23 years of uniformed service to Canada. She was a combat engineer who did two tours in Afghanistan.

In 2008, during her second tour, she was the first female Canadian with a prosthetic to deploy to Afghanistan in the combat zone. Tragically, in 2006, she had lost her leg and her infant son in a horrific accident while she was executing her family care plan as part of a military family. This unspeakable loss did not stop Kim. She gave another decade of service to the Canadian Armed Forces and became an inspiring, award-winning paratriathlete.

Kim is now going to serve again. After three years of being ignored by the Liberal government, she is stepping forward to be the Conservative candidate in Scarborough Southwest. Go, Kim.

Asian Heritage MonthStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Deb Schulte Liberal King—Vaughan, ON

Mr. Speaker, today begins Asian Heritage Month in Canada. This provides an opportunity for everyone to learn about the history of Canada's Asian immigrants and their descendants and to celebrate their many contributions to our country. This includes the growing Asian community in my riding of King—Vaughan and in York Region.

One such celebration is the Taste of Asia Festival, organized by the City of Markham, the Federation of Chinese Canadians in Markham and the Association of Progressive Muslims of Canada and supported by many organizations and businesses. Over 180,000 people attended last year and enjoyed cultural performers, culinary artists and artisans.

One cannot speak of the festival without mentioning Dr. Ken Ng, a family physician, a community leader, chairman of the Federation of Chinese Canadians in Markham and the founder and chairman of the Taste of Asia Festival.

I invite people to come and tickle their taste buds and meet Dr. Ng and his wonderful wife, Emily, tonight at the Taste of Asia reception in Room 7-52 at 131 Queen Street from 5 p.m. to 7p.m.

Let us all kick off Asian Heritage Month together tonight.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, China's military budget rose 5% last year to $250 billion. However, for whatever reason, the Liberal leader continues to use Canadian taxpayers' money to fund China through the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. We know that China uses the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank to extend its influence in the region.

When will the Liberal leader stop using Canadian taxpayers' money to fund this strategy?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as part of the bank, Canada joins many countries such as Great Britain, Germany, and Australia in promoting inclusive global economic growth. The Conservatives are misleading Canadians by suggesting that it would be good for Canada to withdraw funds that are earmarked for landslide mitigation in Sri Lanka, flood management in the Phillippines and irrigation modernization in Indonesia.

We will continue to be engaged in helping people throughout the world. That is what Canadians expect from any Canadian government.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, there are other development banks that Canada already participates in, but this one is specifically used by China to extend its influence in the region.

China's military budget rose 5% last year to $250 billion. Now its space program is worth $8.4 billion. While the Parliamentary Budget Officer has indicated that important infrastructure projects are not getting built in Canada, the leader of the Liberal Party has sent $256 million to the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, a bank that helps exert influence by China in the region.

Why is the Prime Minister funding infrastructure projects in other countries?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:20 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, as part of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, Canada joins countries such as Australia, France, Germany, India, Italy, South Korea and the U.K. in promoting inclusive global economic growth. The bank supports clean and green infrastructure investments throughout Asia.

The Conservatives want us to close our eyes and our doors to investments around the world, like in landslide mitigation in Sri Lanka, like in flood management in the Phillippines, like in irrigation modernization in Indonesia. That is not what Canadians expect. They expect us to be engaged positively in the world and—

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Geoff Regan

The hon. Leader of the Opposition.

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Regina—Qu'Appelle Saskatchewan

Conservative

Andrew Scheer ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the leader of the Liberal Party continues to exert such weakness around the world. The Government of China is holding two Canadian nationals unlawfully. It has blocked Canadian exports, and the Prime Minister has done absolutely nothing to stand up for Canada. He could show the Government of China that there are consequences for pushing Canada around by pulling the funding from the Chinese-run Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. Will he do so, yes or no?

Foreign AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, this government has and will continue to consistently stand up for Canadians at home and all around the world. That is why we were proud to announce this morning that we are standing up for canola farmers by moving forward with a maximum loan limit increase to $1 million for all farmers, and indeed, for canola farmers, an interest-free loan increase to $500,000.

On top of that, we stand up every day for the Canadians who are unjustly and arbitrarily detained in China. We know that engaging strongly and forcefully around the world is the way we are going to—