House of Commons Hansard #37 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was chair.

Topics

Air TransportationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Warren Steinley Conservative Regina—Lewvan, SK

Mr. Speaker, CBC recently reported that Nav Canada is considering closing the air traffic control tower at the Regina International Airport. This plan would reduce safety, reduce flights and reduce the economic recovery in my home province.

My question for the Minister of Transport is simple. Will he provide Nav Canada with the funding needed to keep the air traffic control tower open, or will he continue with this mean-spirited cut to our province? Why do the Liberals treat western Canadians as second-class citizens all the time?

Air TransportationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, I want to reassure my colleague that when NavCan does an examination of service needs across the country, it does so with safety in mind. I also want to reassure him that Transport Canada will also be examining any proposed plans.

The reality of course is that the number of aircraft in the air has diminished drastically in the past few months, and an organization like NavCan has a responsibility to make sure it has the proper service-level needs. That is exactly what it is doing at this time.

Air TransportationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Conservative

Michael Kram Conservative Regina—Wascana, SK

Mr. Speaker, various news outlets are reporting that Nav Canada is planning to shut down the air traffic control towers at airports in Regina, Windsor, Prince George, Whitehorse, Fort McMurray and Sault Ste. Marie. Air traffic control towers provide vital real-time information to pilots about weather conditions and runway traffic, the loss of which would put the safety of Canadians at risk.

Will the government commit today that there will be no closures of air traffic control towers?

Air TransportationOral Questions

2:55 p.m.

Notre-Dame-de-Grâce—Westmount Québec

Liberal

Marc Garneau LiberalMinister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, NavCan is our air traffic controller and has a worldwide reputation for safety. It is, in fact, an enviable record of safety.

As my hon. colleague will probably know, about two-thirds of the number of aircraft that were flying in 2019 are no longer able to fly because of the COVID pandemic, so the number of aircraft in the air has been considerably reduced.

NavCan has a responsibility to evaluate service-level needs across the country, and Transport Canada will be there to oversee it.

Social DevelopmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Liberal

Emmanuel Dubourg Liberal Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, this week the government launched calls for proposals for three programs: the Black entrepreneurship program; the community support, multiculturalism, and anti-racism initiatives program; and the supporting Black Canadian communities initiative.

I am pleased that my government has introduced these measures to help Black communities in particular combat discrimination.

Could the Minister of Small Business talk about why these programs are important?

Social DevelopmentOral Questions

3 p.m.

Markham—Thornhill Ontario

Liberal

Mary Ng LiberalMinister of Small Business

Mr. Speaker, Black entrepreneurs contribute significantly to our communities and our Canadian economy.

This week, I announced the launch of two of the three pillars of this unprecedented program. The call for proposals has been launched.

We recognize that systemic racism exists in the business world and that we must combat it. We are proud to implement this important program.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Greg McLean Conservative Calgary Centre, AB

Mr. Speaker, $16 billion is the amount that Canadians did not receive last year as a result of the discount for our most valuable export product: Canadian oil. This is the result of bad decisions and a constrained pipeline infrastructure to deliver environmentally produced Canadian oil to key markets.

Can the government tell the House its plans to coordinate with the new U.S. administration so that long-planned and existing pipelines can provide the most environmental solution to U.S. refineries?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

3 p.m.

Sudbury Ontario

Liberal

Paul Lefebvre LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, in the past years, we have approved Line 3, with 7,000 jobs created. For Keystone XL, our support is unwavering, with 1,500 jobs created. We are building LNG Canada, with thousands of jobs. We got TMX approved and are getting it built, with 5,600 jobs created so far. We approved NGTL 2021, with thousands of jobs. Orphaned and inactive wells got a $1.7-billion investment, with thousands of jobs created. With the wage subsidy, more than 60,000 resource workers stayed on the job in the pandemic.

That is our record of supporting the oil and gas workers.

InfrastructureOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

David Yurdiga Conservative Fort McMurray—Cold Lake, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister strongly hinted he will block the proposed Fort McMurray to Alaska railway. The Alaska to Alberta railway trade corridor will create new markets for Canadian products, including in oil and gas, mineral extraction, agriculture and food security in the north.

Does the Minister of Infrastructure agree with the Prime Minister's musings on the A2A railway proposal?

InfrastructureOral Questions

3 p.m.

Sudbury Ontario

Liberal

Paul Lefebvre LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, we have not yet received an application, and we cannot review an application we do not have.

This government supports good projects, and we know they only get built after they have gone through a fair and thorough review process. That is how our government approved TMX and the Line 3 replacement pipeline, creating thousands of jobs.

Public SafetyOral Questions

3 p.m.

Conservative

Chris d'Entremont Conservative West Nova, NS

Mr. Speaker, it has been seven months since the worst mass murder in Canadian history sadly took place in my province of Nova Scotia. The families of victims continue to call for information on this tragic event. The report of the inquiry is only due in 2022, and in the meantime, families are having to fight and beg the government for answers.

This week marks the 15th federal Victims and Survivors of Crime Week. Will the Minister of Public Safety commit to providing an update to the families before Christmas and respect their right to information, as protected by the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights?

Public SafetyOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard—Verdun Québec

Liberal

David Lametti LiberalMinister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, we will continue to take steps toward creating a criminal justice system that treats victims and survivors of crime with courtesy, compassion and respect. This includes the ongoing implementation of a Canadian victims bill of rights at the federal, provincial and territorial levels. Through the victims fund, we have made more than $28 million available to provincial and territorial governments and non-governmental organizations to increase awareness and knowledge of victims issues, legislation and services available. It is by working collaboratively at all levels of government that we can continue to empower the resilience of victims and survivors and ensure that their voices are heard.

Public SafetyOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Liberal Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, natural disasters are increasing in frequency and severity. Flooding continues to be the most costly natural disaster in Canada, causing over $1 billion in direct damage each year. Water damage goes beyond the destruction of property. It also places an emotional toll on individuals as their homes are destroyed and families are displaced.

Can the Minister of Public Safety update the House on what the government is doing to help Canadians reduce their financial and physical vulnerability to flooding?

Public SafetyOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Scarborough Southwest Ontario

Liberal

Bill Blair LiberalMinister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Mr. Speaker, as the member for Lac-Saint-Louis has quite accurately pointed out, flooding is the most frequent and costly natural disaster in Canada. That is why this week we announced the creation of an interdisciplinary task force on flood insurance and relocation. The task force will examine options to protect homeowners who are at high risk of flooding and examine the viability of a low-cost national flood insurance program. It will also consider options for the potential relocation of residents in areas of the highest risk. Together, we will work to prevent and mitigate the impacts of floods for all Canadians.

EmploymentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Scott Duvall NDP Hamilton Mountain, ON

Mr. Speaker, millions of Canadians are struggling to pay their bills and put food on the table. The pandemic has only made this problem worse, and many people are facing job uncertainty. The Prime Minister promised that by the end of 2020 he would bring fairness to workplaces across Canada, but he continues to side with big business and betray workers.

Canadians deserve to earn a fair wage for the work they do. Will the government commit to its promise to help hundreds of workers by implementing a $15 federal minimum wage now?

EmploymentOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Hamilton West—Ancaster—Dundas Ontario

Liberal

Filomena Tassi LiberalMinister of Labour

Mr. Speaker, I agree that hard work deserves a decent wage. We know that good quality jobs are a driver of a strong economy along with people being compensated appropriately.

A $15 federal minimum wage is a commitment we made during the campaign as well as one that was reaffirmed in my mandate letter. My priority to this pandemic has been the health and safety of workers across the country. We know a successful restart depends on a safe restart. However, I look forward to moving forward on this commitment. I also look forward to the member's support.

Post-Secondary EducationOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Green

Jenica Atwin Green Fredericton, NB

Mr. Speaker, a beacon of hope we are holding onto during this pandemic and under the threat of the climate crisis is our confidence in the next generation to be innovative and implement solutions to repair the world they inherit from us. However, we are not adequately providing them with the tools and support they need to achieve this aim.

The average student loan debt in New Brunswick is $40,000, significantly higher than the national average. How are they supposed to build back better if they start their career at adult life with such a burden on their shoulders?

Students deserve more than a failed summer program and having to pay their loan, while facing such devastating socio-economic uncertainty. What is the government doing now, in a concrete way, to support students through this? At the very least, is the minister in support of suspending the collection of interest—

Post-Secondary EducationOral Questions

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. minister.

Post-Secondary EducationOral Questions

November 26th, 2020 / 3:05 p.m.

Waterloo Ontario

Liberal

Bardish Chagger LiberalMinister of Diversity and Inclusion and Youth

Mr. Speaker, it is really important that we have issues facing youth being raised in the House of Commons. That is exactly why the Prime Minister ensured there was a full voice at the cabinet table. Young people are not only the leaders of tomorrow; they are the leaders of today.

That is why when it came to a response to the pandemic, we put forward a $9 billion suite of programs. Students will not be left behind. Youths will not be left behind. They are part of a decision-making table. We will continue to raise the right voices.

Right now we have the state of youth report being written and I encourage young people to get involved. Having their say is instrumental as the way we build back even better and consciously more inclusive.

Supply ManagementPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Bloc

Yves Perron Bloc Berthier—Maskinongé, QC

Mr. Speaker, there have been consultations among the parties and I believe you will find unanimous consent for the following motion:

That the House recognize that the government should respect its promise to supply-managed producers and processors affected by the last three economic agreements by: (a) revealing details without delay related to the compensation that will be paid to dairy, egg, chicken and poultry producers and processors for the duration of the compensation agreements; and (b) budgeting this compensation to make it predictable until the end of the agreement.

Supply ManagementPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

This being a hybrid sitting of the House, for the sake of clarity, I will only ask those who are opposed to the motion to express their disagreement.

Accordingly, all those opposed to the hon. members' motion will please say nay.

There being no dissenting voice, I declare the motion carried.

(Motion agreed to)

Supply ManagementPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Joël Godin Conservative Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, as far as I know, under the rules of procedure of the House, members are not allowed to talk on the phone in the chamber. If members look at the recording, they will see that the Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, the veteran member for Winnipeg North, spoke on the phone several times today during question period.

I would like to know whether the rules have changed. If not, the member should be informed that this is not permitted.

Supply ManagementPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the parties were told that it is the only way we can notify people at home that it is their turn to reply.

If the opposition would prefer that ministers who are not here not be allowed to answer questions, it can make that suggestion.

Supply ManagementPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Conservative

Joël Godin Conservative Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, QC

Mr. Speaker, I just want all members to know that I was not informed of the new policy. Maybe that information should be shared with all members of Parliament.

Supply ManagementPoints of OrderOral Questions

3:10 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, the House Leader of the Official Opposition is aware of it. We have discussed it.

If there is some other way to proceed or some other technology, I would like to see it, but for now, it is important to the opposition and to democracy to ensure that all ministers, whether they are here or elsewhere, be able to answer all the questions. That means we need some way to ask them to answer, and that is the only one we have at the moment.