House of Commons Hansard #14 of the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was case.

Topics

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Bloc

Yves-François Blanchet Bloc Beloeil—Chambly, QC

Mr. Speaker, how odd to suggest that I or any member of the Quebec National Assembly would feel reassured.

Since the government has seen the light, I will quote the Premier of Quebec, who said, “We are again asking that bill 21 be respected and that the federal leaders promise not to participate in any legal challenges.”

Those are François Legault's words.

Does the government now acknowledge the legitimacy of bill 21 on secularism?

JusticeOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard—Verdun Québec

Liberal

David Lametti LiberalMinister of Justice

Mr. Speaker, we have said from the start that it is not up to the government to tell women what to wear or what not to wear, but we also said that we would closely monitor what was happening in Quebec.

There are Quebeckers who are currently challenging the bill in court, and that is the right forum.

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jagmeet Singh NDP Burnaby South, BC

Mr. Speaker, why do the Liberals continue to fight first nations children in court? It is completely inexplicable.

Imagine being a parent whose kids are being denied services by the government, and that the very same government is spending over $8 million fighting those kids in court. That is what is happening here. That is what the Liberal government is doing.

Can the Liberals explain to parents across this country why they are spending millions of dollars fighting kids in court instead of investing in their future?

Indigenous AffairsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Soeurs Québec

Liberal

Marc Miller LiberalMinister of Indigenous Services

Mr. Speaker, we agree that we must compensate first nations children who were harmed as a result of government policies related to child and family services in the past. We want a solution that is both comprehensive and fair.

As my colleague knows very well, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ordered the Government of Canada to begin discussions on a process for compensating victims of federal discrimination against first nations children, and that is what we are doing. Our target date for presenting an initial compensation model is February 21. That is what we are doing.

HealthOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

NDP

Jagmeet Singh NDP Burnaby South, BC

Mr. Speaker, I was in Regina yesterday to support the workers who are fighting for their pensions. Workers across the country are under attack.

Instead of helping working people, the Liberal government is proposing a tax cut that is going to help the top 10%. Workers need help now. There are millions of Canadians who cannot afford to pay for their medications. There are millions of Canadians who cannot afford to take care of their teeth. Will the Liberals stand up for these workers and help them and their families by investing in a national pharmacare program that is universal and by investing in a national dental care program that helps people who cannot afford to take care of their teeth?

HealthOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I share my colleague's deep concern for Canadians who have been in the position, and still are, of having to make decisions between affording their medication or having enough food to eat. That is why our government took such strong action in our last mandate to actually move forward on the development of a national universal pharmacare program.

We continue to do that work. We have taken incredible steps toward that, and I look forward to the member's ideas on how to make sure that we reach our goal of ensuring that Canadians have the medications they need.

HealthOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Conservative

Todd Doherty Conservative Cariboo—Prince George, BC

Mr. Speaker, yesterday officials confirmed two things: that the coronavirus can be spread through droplet transmission and that the government does not know where the plane that carried the original coronavirus patients into Canada is or if it was ever quarantined on its arrival in our country.

Can the Minister of Transport confirm the whereabouts of this aircraft today, and what measures, if any, were taken to ensure the risks of spread by droplet transmission to future passengers were mitigated?

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I am not quite sure about the premise of the conversation.

I would like to assure Canadians that in fact it is correct that the virus is spread through droplets, and the plane will be completely clean upon arrival to transport Canadians. As well, Canadians will be screened—

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

I just want to remind hon. members that one question was asked. We cannot keep throwing questions and expect the minister to answer. We ask one question and we are getting an answer, so let us listen.

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

Patty Hajdu Liberal Thunder Bay—Superior North, ON

Mr. Speaker, let me start over. I do not understand if the member is asking about whether or not there are droplets on the plane, in the plane or in between passengers.

I will say this, though: As I outlined yesterday in the media, the plan is to ensure that passengers are safe, are transported accordingly, and are quarantined when they arrive in Canada.

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

It is no wonder, Mr. Speaker; his question was for the Minister of Transport.

Yesterday, the minister said that the 27 passengers aboard flight CZ311 had been contacted and that they posed no risk to the public. The problem is that this type of aircraft can hold 300 to 350 passengers. The 27 passengers she is talking about were those who were within three metres of the two people infected with the coronavirus.

At a time when the whole world is taking major precautions, how is it that the minister does not know where all the passengers are, what their current condition is and where the plane is located?

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for the clarity in the question. The member is referring to the plane that one passenger who was symptomatic came off.

As I mentioned in the House yesterday, all 27 passengers in his vicinity were screened and found to be negative, not carriers of the virus. The plane was cleaned according to infectious disease protocols in partnership with the airline, which would be doing that, I would hope, in between all flights, and certainly—

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The hon. member for Edmonton Riverbend.

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Matt Jeneroux Conservative Edmonton Riverbend, AB

Mr. Speaker, first the minister says “it will be” cleaned and then she says she “hopes it will be” cleaned. Where is the plane?

Yesterday the health committee learned that the government had not located the plane carrying the first confirmed coronavirus case. There is no knowledge of whether passengers immediately reboarded the plane or whether proper sanitation processes took place. Locating this plane is crucial.

Is there any chance that others travelling on this plane could have caught the virus and gone undetected?

HealthOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, one of the interesting elements of the coronavirus outbreak has been the spread of misinformation and fear across Canadian society. That was actually noted by an interviewer on the weekend.

In fact, she asked me how Canadians can be assured that they are getting the right information. One way might be if the opposition does not sensationalize the risk to Canadians and allows Canadians to understand where they can find a wealth of information.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Jag Sahota Conservative Calgary Skyview, AB

Mr. Speaker, the Trans Mountain expansion moving forward is helpful, but the Liberals passed Bill C-69, and that means no private sector pipelines will be built or proposed in Canada again.

My constituents in Calgary Skyview are out of work, underemployed and losing hope because these Liberals cancelled northern gateway, killed energy east and delayed the Trans Mountain pipeline for years. One pipeline to global markets is not enough.

Will the Liberals listen to constituents and Canadians and scrap Bill C-69?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

North Vancouver B.C.

Liberal

Jonathan Wilkinson LiberalMinister of Environment and Climate Change

Mr. Speaker, the Impact Assessment Act was developed to ensure that good projects would move forward in the right way. We are very proud of the work that was done on the Impact Assessment Act. It will ensure that we are considering all of the environmental effects and ensure that good projects actually do move ahead.

Of course, we were very pleased today to see that the Trans Mountain pipeline will be going ahead. That is an important project for the energy sector and an important project for all Canadians.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Gérard Deltell Conservative Louis-Saint-Laurent, QC

Mr. Speaker, Canada got some very good news today. The Court of Appeal unanimously gave the green light to the Trans Mountain project. This is a victory for all Canadians, especially for energy workers.

It is also a victory for the current and future governments because Trans Mountain will generate $21.6 billion in taxes during the construction period and the following 20 years of operation, which means that every minister will be able to spend.

What does the Minister of Canadian Heritage intend to do with his billions of dollars?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

February 4th, 2020 / 2:35 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, I will take this opportunity to answer the question by addressing the court's ruling today on TMX, because we know that in Canada in the 21st century, good projects can only move forward when we consult and address environmental concerns and the concerns of indigenous communities and local communities.

We know that there are a lot of diverse views on TMX. We know that there are a lot of divergent views on today's decision, but we remain steadfast in our commitment to TMX and to seeing that it moves forward in the right way by rolling up our sleeves and by doing the hard work. We are getting this project built.

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Shannon Stubbs Conservative Lakeland, AB

Mr. Speaker, today's court decision on TMX is welcome, but it is not enough. It was supposed to be in service two months ago, and the Liberals are losing $20,000 a day. What is still missing is a concrete plan from them.

Legal threats remain. Here is what opponents have stated: Response will be “larger and more disruptive than last year” and “we're prepared to do whatever it takes to stop this pipeline” and “No matter who approves it, this pipeline will not be built.”

What will the Liberals actually do against these threats and when will they guarantee an in-service date for the Trans Mountain expansion?

Natural ResourcesOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

St. John's South—Mount Pearl Newfoundland & Labrador

Liberal

Seamus O'Regan LiberalMinister of Natural Resources

Mr. Speaker, today, work on the greater Edmonton pipeline construction is under way. Work at the Edmonton terminal and the Kamloops terminal is under way. Work at stockpile sites at North Gate, Merritt, Enoch Cree and Edson is under way. Work at pump stations in Edson, Hinton and Black Pines is under way.

TMX is being built.

ImmigrationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Christine Normandin Bloc Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, the government just said that Bill 21 must be challenged.

The Deputy Prime Minister regularly cites François Legault's position on the CUSMA to avoid having to answer our questions about aluminum. My colleagues can see where I am going: We are going to take advantage of this unexpected opportunity.

Mr. Legault is calling for more authority over immigration. Quebec wants to makes its own decisions about how many immigrants it takes in and how it will grant permanent residence. The province also wants to take full charge of the temporary foreign worker program.

Will the government finally agree to Quebec's legitimate demands?

ImmigrationOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Honoré-Mercier Québec

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, since we are indirectly talking about the free trade agreement, I remind my colleagues that this agreement is good for the aluminum industry. The fact that the aluminum industry, chambers of commerce, various stakeholders in Quebec, the Government of Quebec and Premier Legault all support it shows that there is consensus. The members of the Bloc Québécois are the only ones who do not.

I want to reach out to my friends in the Bloc Québécois. In Quebec, we say that we are stronger when we come together. Let us then come together and support the agreement.