House of Commons Hansard #33 of the 43rd Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was chair.

Topics

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

4:55 p.m.

Honoré-Mercier Québec

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez LiberalLeader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate my colleague from the Bloc Québécois, who, I must admit, is a formidable negotiator. He passionately defends his point of view, but he is also able to listen. I commend him for that. We were able to discuss, debate and come to a consensus for the good of all Quebeckers and Canadians.

If you had told me five months ago that I would be talking to my colleague on Saturday evening, Sunday morning, Sunday afternoon, Sunday evening, and so on, I never would have believed you. Nevertheless, that is what we did, and we managed to agree on solutions together.

In the spirit of collaboration, I would like to ask my colleague if he is prepared to work with us and the other members of the House to explore whether a virtual Parliament or virtual sittings are possible.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

4:55 p.m.

Bloc

Alain Therrien Bloc La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I return the compliment.

Back home, when negotiations are going poorly, we like to say that negotiating is like trying to eat an apple though a tennis racket. Negotiating is hard, but we end up reaching an agreement because we are reasonable people living in exceptional circumstances.

As for the virtual Parliament, our leader had already suggested that idea, and you reacted very swiftly. We agree on that idea for the safety of the people around us. Rest assured that the Bloc Québécois will be your ally in implementing this measure.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

4:55 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

I am glad to have an ally, but I would remind the member from La Prairie that he must address the Chair, not other members directly.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

April 11th, 2020 / 4:55 p.m.

Conservative

Lianne Rood Conservative Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, it is an honour to be here today representing my constituents in Lambton—Kent—Middlesex as we all work together here to help Canadians who need support right now.

I have many farmers in my riding who grow fresh produce. I know farmers do grow a lot in Quebec as well. The government has said that $5 billion has been put aside through FCC, but we all know that the $5 billion was a campaign promise made as part of the Liberals' election platform.

Would the member agree that the money should be restructured to provide direct support in response to this COVID-19 crisis? Also, does the member agree that our food safety and security is critical and that agriculture and food should be deemed an essential service, including making sure that CFIA inspectors, who are federally regulated, should continue working so that our food supply is protected?

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

4:55 p.m.

Bloc

Alain Therrien Bloc La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, my area is known as the garden of Quebec, because it is probably one of the most beautiful places in the world. At the very least, it is home to the best black soil in Quebec.

When we talk about agriculture, an essential need and an economic activity that is often overlooked and neglected, we are obviously talking about an essential service. This is an asset that we need to protect. That much is obvious.

I am not the only person who lives in an agricultural area. We can all agree that agriculture is essential.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

4:55 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for La Prairie for his speech.

I would like to thank all Bloc Québécois members for their positive contribution today. We are in this together, and that moves me.

What does the member think of the current level of support for small businesses? That is one of my concerns. I would like his point of view on that problem.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5 p.m.

Bloc

Alain Therrien Bloc La Prairie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for her comment and her question.

While negotiating this bill, we wanted to make things better for small businesses. Many of them are in a very precarious position, which is why we asked the federal government to subsidize some of their fixed costs. With help, these businesses will not be forced to take out loans that would compromise their future and their ability to survive the crisis. If they were to take out such loans, growth and economic prosperity would be out of the question. For all these reasons, we asked the government for help, and we got subsidies to cover a portion of small businesses' fixed costs.

Quebec has always spent money on small businesses because they are economic engines for our communities and our country.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5 p.m.

NDP

Lindsay Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, before I get started, I would just like to inform the House that I will be splitting my time with my hon. colleague, the member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie.

Like many members here in the House today, I am also hearing concerns and fears from constituents. Constituents are seeing businesses closing, they are being laid off and they are at home taking care of their families. They are also asking the government some serious questions. They need to know that we will quickly provide them with the help they so desperately need.

New Democrats support an increase in the wage subsidy. In fact, we have been calling for this for several weeks, but we think that it would be a wasted opportunity today to reconvene the House to deal with this issue without also dealing with the very serious gaps in the Canada emergency response benefit. I am happy that the unanimous consent motion starts to address our concerns.

I want my constituents in London to know that today, together, we can make sure that the programs and supports they need are provided. My staff and I have spoken with so many folks worried about how the government will keep them safe, housed, fed and employed. It is my responsibility to voice their concerns here in this place. My team has been working tirelessly to update our social media and connect with people via email and phone, getting them the information that we can. I am so grateful to my staff for that. My constituency office is normally busy at the best of times.

Many people are struggling to get the supports they need now and too many vulnerable people will not even qualify. There are holes in the system, and that is why New Democrats continue to advocate that the emergency benefits be made universal. Every week my office receives thousands of phone calls, emails and messages from people who need support, but the programs announced thus far, sadly, fall short of their needs.

I consistently hear from seniors and people with disabilities who are feeling the financial impact of COVID-19 through increased food cost, increased costs for the delivery of goods such as groceries and from being limited to 30 days of medications when they would normally receive 90 days. This means they need to spend three times the amount on dispensing fees, a cost that unstainable for those on a fixed income.

Many veterans organizations are scrambling, including London's Royal Canadian Air Force Association 427 Wing. This institution in London—Fanshawe is very dear to me. It not only serve veterans and provides a place for them to gather, but also is home to the Secrets of Radar and the Spirit of Flight museums. Even just the building it resides in is worth preserving as a major historical site in London. With the temporary closure due to COVID-19, it has seen a large drop in revenue. I fear that this temporary closure will not just be temporary and that we will lose this valuable place that supports so much history and so many veterans. These institutions need our help.

When it comes to COVID-19, the impact is felt by everyone, including students. While the 75% wage subsidy will keep more Canadians employed, many young Canadians are just trying to start their careers or are looking for summer jobs. With more than one million jobs lost since COVID-19 hit, many job prospects look grim. Students typically do not have savings stored away for a rainy day and many are graduating with crippling debt. With this pandemic, they have fewer opportunities to earn money to support themselves and pay back their loans. This is wrong and we need to do better. New Democrats are also calling on the federal government to permanently extend the waiver of interest charges on student loans. The government should not profit off the backs and the futures of our students. Not now and not ever.

This is a situation that no one could have predicted and prepared for, and I am sure that all members would agree with me that no one should lose their housing, which is a basic human right during this time. From a public health perspective, if Canadians are to follow directives from the health authorities to practise social distancing and self-isolation, they must have a home to quarantine in. Workers who are sick cannot feel pressured to continue working and risk infecting others for fear of losing their income and the roofs over their heads. Given the homelessness crisis that already exists in Canada, not only do we need to have measures in place to properly house everyone, we also must do everything we can to prevent an increase in the homeless population.

To protect renters, it is essential to put a nationwide moratorium on all evictions during the pandemic. As well, a temporary rent freeze period must also be imposed to protect renters from price gouging during this precarious time. My NDP colleagues and I are hearing from constituents who have just received a rent increase notice and are extremely distressed by the prospect of having to find alternative housing at this time.

Whether it is seniors, people with disabilities, veterans, students, workers or small-business owners, we see people who are looking for support but finding none. As it stands, it is estimated that 862,000 Canadians who need help will get nothing through employment insurance or the government's emergency response benefit. Every day last week, the Prime Minister and the government highlighted gaps in supports, but due to the work done here today, hopefully more Canadians will not fall through these cracks. However, the government needs to provide direct assistance to all Canadians immediately. The NDP is asking for the government to send a cheque of $2,000, with an additional $250 per child, to every Canadian immediately.

As many of my colleagues and I have mentioned in the House numerous times, 46% of Canadians are $200 or less away from financial insolvency. Many of those people live in my riding of London—Fanshawe. By providing direct assistance to them, we can make sure this crisis does not turn into a catastrophe.

For those who rely on the government programs and benefits offered, like the child care benefit, they first have to file their taxes to access this help. If they do not, they could face being cut off. This is happens when programs are means tested, and not universal. It often results in more bureaucracy, delays and people going without help. I am happy that the government announced it is moving the tax-filing deadline.

As I run a volunteer tax clinic from my constituency office, we see hundreds of people who need help to file their taxes. In my community, these tax clinics, sadly, have been closed, but we need to provide this vital service. I ask the government, on behalf of my constituents, to consider extending that deadline once again so that we can help as many people as possible to file their taxes. Simply put, a one-month extension is not enough.

Not only are people struggling, but many small businesses are facing their own crisis. I cannot imagine their heartbreak now when they have put everything into their business, the countless hours, time with family and their life savings into building their dream, and now see it in danger of disappearing. They are closing their doors but trying their hardest to keep paying their employees. With income declining and bills piling up, this situation is becoming impossible to maintain.

That is why we are happy the government listened to New Democrats, labour and business groups to strengthen this wage subsidy. We called for this before the House sat the last time, and I am grateful that some of the changes passed today would help get the supports flowing to small and medium-sized enterprises, charities, not-for-profits and non-profits. However, we need to address shortfalls in this legislation, such as removing the 30%-drop-in-revenue requirement for SMEs with fewer than 50 employees so that more of them could apply for the wage subsidy. We must also remove payroll limits on the $40,000 loan through the Canada emergency benefit account and offer $10,000 grants immediately to help a diverse group of enterprises and ensure a faster response time for businesses to receive supports.

I must say I am relieved to see the change that New Democrats pushed for, to ensure that when some local organizations pay meagre stipends to their volunteers, those people will still qualify for emergency benefit programs even if they lose their jobs.

New Democrats are ready to improve all benefits for all people and will keep working to make sure that companies cannot turn the money meant for workers into big CEO bonuses. That needs to be reflected in this legislation. There is always a worry that large corporations will use this crisis to their benefit, and that is why there is so much concern about the government's partnering with Amazon for the distribution of personal protective equipment and supplies purchased by the Canadian government. The announcement was made without consultation with postal workers, and the government's decision will put further strain on workers who are already poorly protected. Amazon uses numerous subcontractors throughout its delivery operations. Warehouse workers are also being put at risk. They are being pressured to continue working even when they get sick.

As the COVID-19 crisis continues, we owe our thanks to many front-line workers. Truck drivers, food production and grocery workers, pharmacy workers, EMS workers and the health care providers who are working in our hospitals and long-term facilities are heroes. These workers must have access to personal protective equipment and their worker's rights must be respected.

Also on the front lines are social workers who are working with their clients, those struggling with a lack of social and mental health supports and who now are facing increased anxieties. Social workers are also dealing with the reality of trying to maintain social distancing at work and in shelters. Many shelters in Canada are at over capacity at the best of times. How do people maintain social distancing when they do not have their own home? How do they maintain services at friendship and drop-in centres when they are supposed to be limiting contact? This crisis has further exposed many of the gaps in our system, especially for our most vulnerable. Food banks are also in desperate need of help. We are prepared to work with the government to make sure that those supports are in place to assist people in need.

In conclusion, we must find a way to make sure that everyone in Canada can get through these unprecedented times with enough money to pay the bills, a job to go back to and a safe place to live. We need to do it as quickly as possible. Let us join together to pass this bill to put the supports in place to lift each other up. Let us commit to helping one another to see us through this and move forward to strengthen our public services and social programs for everyone.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:10 p.m.

Outremont Québec

Liberal

Rachel Bendayan LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Small Business

Mr. Speaker, I would particularly like to thank my colleague opposite for her remarks and concern about homelessness. That is exactly why the government doubled the amount of funding for the reaching home initiative. It is also why we have announced additional funding for women's shelters in order to support the most vulnerable in our country.

I would also like to thank the NDP for its support for the wage subsidy, which would help small and medium-sized enterprises from coast to coast. It would also help not-for-profits and charities.

Does my colleague agree that the government's proposal to extend the wage subsidy to not-for-profits and charities is a good idea?

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:10 p.m.

NDP

Lindsay Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, yes, we have supported that. It is something we were pushing for as well. There is a reality on the ground. I have heard it constantly from people who are doing that amazing work on the ground, the food banks, people who are helping people with disabilities, seniors, all of those organizations. I am so glad they will be able to take advantage of some of these supports.

However, I do not want to lose the opportunity for us to also help their clients, the most vulnerable among us in Canada, who are so reliant on those services, social programs, charities and not-for-profit organizations. I would like us to remember that as we move forward with changes to the CERB.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:10 p.m.

Conservative

Scot Davidson Conservative York—Simcoe, ON

Mr. Speaker, someone in my riding reached out to me this morning. Her husband drives a bus for the TTC in Toronto. He is an essential worker. She is a PSW at a nursing home in Bradford West Gwillimbury. There has been an outbreak in that nursing home and she has had to take her kids to her parents to be watched for the day, which is a big ask of her parents. She makes $550 a week. She called me and said that at the end of the day, she is putting the lives of her kids and her parents at risk for $550 a week.

I wonder if the member has some comment on the CERB with respect to that.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:10 p.m.

NDP

Lindsay Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have a cousin who is a PSW. I have certainly heard from a lot of them in my riding as well, and from local bus drivers with the London Transit Commission. They are really concerned that for some of their clients, those in wheelchairs and with disabilities, they have to get really close to them in order to strap them in. Last week one of our LTC drivers tested positive for COVID-19, so my thoughts are with him and his family.

I have had a lot of conversations with those front-line workers. Again, I am optimistic, after having heard from the Minister of Employment today, that those people who are applying for more of the services they need, more of these emergency benefits, as long as they are doing it in good faith, will not be penalized in any way and will receive the supports they need.

The New Democrats will always be pushing for a lot more to ensure that people are protected and receive the supports they need.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:15 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I believe my colleague spoke earlier about the difficulties being experienced by small and medium-sized businesses in his riding and across the country.

What can the federal government do to help them pay their rent since about 70% of them will likely be unable to pay their commercial rent on May 1?

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:15 p.m.

NDP

Lindsay Mathyssen NDP London—Fanshawe, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have heard from so many businesses that are really concerned. They do not want to take out a loan or be behind the eight ball more than they already are, so looking at rent freezes is absolutely vital to helping those small and medium-sized enterprises. In my riding and across the country these businesses provide, I think, 95% or at least over 90% of the jobs in our community. We have to support them. We have to go further.

I am very hopeful the government will continue to go forward with those propositions that the NDP is putting forward.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:15 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would first like to emphasize the severity of the crisis that we are all experiencing. Neither we nor our parents have ever seen its like. The only comparable situation seems to be the Spanish flu, which hit just over a century ago.

Tens of thousands of people are getting sick, thousands of people are being hospitalized and many people are dying. Scientists are saying that we are relatively fortunate that the mortality rate of COVID-19 is not higher or it would be truly catastrophic. However, we are all going through this situation together and we have no idea when we will see the end of it.

Canada's Parliament has been suspended. When it is recalled, only 10% of members are in attendance. There is a lot of uncertainty about the future. People are struggling in all of our communities. They are suffering and having trouble paying their rent and buying groceries, as I just said. Some experience anxiety and a great deal of stress. Community groups are telling us that there has been a resurgence in mental health problems that may have been resolved in the past but that are coming back because of a lack of resources.

Given that everyone is being asked to stay home, there are also terrible situations of domestic violence, and women are the primary victims. Home is not always the safest place. On the contrary, it is sometimes the most dangerous.

This situation is forcing us to do things differently, to be creative, to think outside the box, as they say, and to work together in a way that we have never managed to do in the past.

This reminds me of something our former leader, the late Jack Layton, said. He used to always tell us we had to work together. Now it is becoming clear that we are capable of working together as parliamentarians.

I want to take 15 seconds to thank a number of government ministers for their availability, their quick responses, their willingness to listen and their openness to suggestions from the NDP, the Bloc Québécois, the Green Party and the Conservatives. Some of our proposals were accepted. Everyone wants to be constructive and come up with solutions to help people. Of course, we will always suggest doing more, but I have seen more open-mindedness and willingness to listen than ever before, and I wanted to emphasize that.

We have heard this a lot in the media over the past few weeks, but I too want to thank all our workers in the health care system: the doctors, nurses, orderlies, paramedics. They are doing tremendous work on the front lines. They are taking risks to save lives and take care of people. I tip my hat to them.

I also want to thank all the municipal employees, bus drivers, the people who keep our cities in operation. Thank you very much for a job well done. We need you in order to keep going.

Obviously, I want to thank the agricultural sector, the entire supply chain for our grocery stores and convenience stores. They are vital to allowing us to get through this crisis together.

I would like to take a step back and look at the crisis. We can already learn some lessons. Some observations can be made after just a few weeks, while our economy is in turmoil and many people are going through a tough time. I think the crisis reveals two things. First, inequality kills. Second, we need social programs and public services. We see it. After years of financial capitalism and neo-liberalism and austerity measures, people have become more vulnerable. In times of crisis such as this, the most vulnerable are more likely to fall ill, and they are also more likely to die.

Not so long ago, my colleague from London—Fanshawe noted that the inequalities in our society are such that half of all families are $200 away from insolvency. That means that our wealth redistribution mechanism is completely inadequate. Canada's big six banks made $46 billion in profits last year and there are still people who keep their money in tax havens.

People become vulnerable when we are not able to provide good care for people who have mental health or addiction problems. These people then end up homeless and on the street. When a crisis like this happens, they are the first to suffer. They are not on the streets because of chance or fate.

These people end up in these situations because of political and economic choices. This morning, an article in La Presse reported that COVID-19 had a higher than average mortality rate among African-American communities in the U.S. because these communities have long lived in poverty and in unsafe conditions that are associated with an increase in respiratory problems, heart problems and diabetes. People with these conditions who contract the virus are at higher risk of death. That is another example that poverty kills during a pandemic.

There is another example people will understand, and this is something the NDP tries to talk about as often as possible, because it is a major concern for some of our colleagues. I am talking about first nations, whose members are extremely vulnerable under these circumstances. They lack health and social services at the best of times. As the NDP leader said a little earlier today, when the nearest ventilator is a plane ride away, that puts people in a vulnerable position. When people do not have clean water, they cannot follow handwashing guidelines. When housing is a problem because homes in many indigenous communities are overcrowded, physical distancing guidelines just do not work. If the virus ever reaches those communities, the death toll could be staggering.

The reason things are so bad is that we have left them to fester for decades. We have a history of colonial treatment of first nations, and we need to recognize that. We must seize the opportunity afforded by this crisis to own that history and not make the same mistakes again.

I was talking earlier about the second thing that this crisis has made clear, and that is the importance of having a social safety net, universal social programs, a system that ensures that no one is left behind or falls through the cracks. I think we can get started on that. Of course we have to get through this crisis. We need to take care of people and find masks, gloves and everything else, but we have to come to the conclusion that a guaranteed income supplement might not be such a bad idea. It might helps us absorb the costs collectively when a crisis occurs, whether it is a social, health or economic crisis or even all three at once, as is currently the case.

We need to have a robust social safety net and universal social programs, and there must be oversight of the care provided, especially to seniors. In Quebec and Canada we are very proud to have a public and universal health care system. Imagine the situation for Americans. People without any insurance cannot go to the hospital because they are afraid of getting an exorbitant bill. We would be in a much tougher situation today.

Nevertheless, the private sector has been left to carve out its own leeway and space with regard to delivering certain services. Another example is very revealing. It is a shocking story that came out this morning about a private long-term care home in Dorval. Because of low wages and poor working conditions, the employees simply stopped going to work. Dozens of elderly residents were totally abandoned. The public health directorate of Montreal had to take over running the care home after residents suffered agonizing ordeals. That is the consequence of the political decision to let the private sector take over certain health care services. Maybe that should not even be the case, and that is something we should think about. Now is the perfect time to think about it, in fact. Residents who died were left in their beds, while others lay on the floor where they had fallen, dehydrated and starving. They had not received care or services in days. We need to collectively ensure that this never happens again.

People are saying that they cannot wait until things get back to normal. As progressives, we say that going back to normal is not the solution, because normality was part of the problem. We need to seize this opportunity to fundamentally change things in order to avoid repeating the mistakes of neo-liberal austerity and public service cutbacks. We need to ensure that the people providing services get good working conditions. Forget about going back to normal. We can do better. Everything will be okay, and we are going to do better.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

Argenteuil—La Petite-Nation Québec

Liberal

Stéphane Lauzon LiberalParliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Seniors

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague from Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie for his speech. I think he delivered an historic speech.

From the very beginning, we have committed to full collaboration. We have talked about the before, during and after.

Would my colleague opposite agree that, when it comes time for the “after”, we will need to continue this strong collaboration among all parties in the House of Commons?

We will need it to get through this crisis, to be better and to prepare properly for the future.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his question.

I was wondering whether what he was really asking was that I turn down the volume during question period from now on.

Individually and collectively, we need to learn from this crisis in order to make better decisions for what happens next. There are good ideas coming from all political parties. We have to be able to recognize that.

What matters most is that we can take care of Canadians and ensure prosperity. We need to do things differently to avoid repeating past mistakes.

I very much appreciated my colleague's comments.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie for his fine, heartfelt speech.

He talked about inequality. He also referred to something that I see as a problem and that is the huge profits that banks are making and the use of tax havens. In order to reduce inequality during this crisis, the government is going to inject huge amounts of cash into the banking system. It might even buy troubled assets to help the banks.

Does my colleague believe that, in return, the big banks should contribute by putting an end to their lawful use of tax havens to avoid paying taxes in Canada?

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is an excellent suggestion.

Sometimes there is a completely indecent accrual of profit and capital, while there are people living in poverty who do not have the bare minimum they need to survive.

It is a give and take. If the government helps banks to prevent too much bankruptcy and job loss, then I think that the banks should stop coming up with ways to send their profits and their CEOs' money to tax havens so that they do not have to pay taxes in Canada. We need that money to pay for the social safety net that we were talking about earlier.

I think that any assistance, particularly for large industries like that one and the oil and gas industry, should come with conditions so that we all come out on top in the end.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie. I completely agree with him.

Perhaps he will agree with me that neo-liberalism's time has passed.

COVID-19 Emergency Response Act, No. 2Government Orders

5:25 p.m.

NDP

Alexandre Boulerice NDP Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, QC

Mr. Speaker, that statement carries a lot of historic weight.

I hope that we will have the wisdom to come to the same conclusion. Taking an exclusively neo-liberal approach erodes a society, a community.

Business of the HouseGovernment Orders

5:30 p.m.

NDP

Jagmeet Singh NDP Burnaby South, BC

Mr. Speaker, following consultations with all of the parties, I would like to seek unanimous consent for the following motion:

I move:

That, notwithstanding any standing order, special order or usual practice of the House, paragraph r) of the order adopted earlier today be replaced with the following:

the government implement measures without delay to address gaps in the Canada Emergency Response Benefit, or other programs, existing or proposed, to address the needs of seasonal workers, those who have exhausted their EI benefits, students, owner/operators, those who continue to receive a modest income from part-time work, royalties, and honoraria, and that, in addition, the government work to ensure essential workers who receive low wages will receive additional income support during this time of crisis, and commit that those who have applied in good faith for and received benefits through CERB or other programs to support them through this crisis will not be unjustly penalized;

Business of the HouseGovernment Orders

5:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Does the hon. member have the unanimous consent of the House to move the motion?

Business of the HouseGovernment Orders

5:30 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Business of the HouseGovernment Orders

5:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

The House has heard the terms of the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?