House of Commons Hansard #93 of the 43rd Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was targets.

Topics

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Let us try this again. I believe the technician had to resort to muting everyone, including the Speaker, which is not a good way to run the chamber. I am sure you will all agree. We have to have some respect for each other. Heckling online in a virtual setting really breaks everything up. Respect does go both ways.

The hon. member for Lethbridge.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Rachael Harder Conservative Lethbridge, AB

Mr. Speaker, because the minister lacks answers to the real questions that Canadians have, he resorts to attacking me on a very personal level. It is incredibly inappropriate, and I look forward to his apology at the end of the day.

Nevertheless, at committee last week, Conservatives put forward a motion that would ensure this newly modified bill is still compliant with the charter and protects the fundamental rights and freedoms of Canadians. As legislators, this is our utmost responsibility. It is always the right thing to contend for Canadians' charter rights.

Nevertheless, the Liberals shut down debate on our important motion last week. Why?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Laurier—Sainte-Marie Québec

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I would like to quote the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, which said, “Bill C-10 on broadcasting has come under unprecedented attack in recent days from the Conservative Party.... Conservatives sacrifice culture on the altar of partisanship.”

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:30 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, we have lost count of the number of experts who have spoken out categorically against the new version of the Liberals' Bill C-10.

A former CRTC commissioner, former CRTC national directors, lawyers, university professors and experts in freedom of expression all said that the bill went much too far and that it stepped over an unacceptable line.

Why are the minister and the Liberal government refusing to listen to all these experts?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

May 3rd, 2021 / 2:30 p.m.

Laurier—Sainte-Marie Québec

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I would like to quote what the executive director of the Professional Music Publishers' Association said to the member from Richmond—Arthabaska. He said, “[I]t is very disappointing that you and the Conservative Party of Canada chose partisanship over our Quebec and Canadian culture. The study of Bill C-10 is not even completed. Freedom of expression is not threatened in Canada by any party but yours.”

It is pure politics. The system has a decades-long proven track record—the Conservative Party of Canada has chosen web giants over our culture.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, whether the minister likes it or not, the list of critics is getting longer by the day, and the minister knows it. He also knows that his new version of Bill C-10 does nothing to protect freedom of expression. Even worse, it is a direct attack on it and an affront to our democracy.

Michael Geist, professor emeritus in the faculty of law at the University of Ottawa, has said that this is “the most anti-Internet government in Canadian history”. It is not the Conservative Party saying that, but rather a professor emeritus of law.

Why do this minister and his Liberal government refuse to listen to the experts, plain and simple?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Laurier—Sainte-Marie Québec

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, this time I would like to quote the president of the Fédération nationale des communications et de la culture. Speaking directly to the member for Richmond—Arthabaska, she said, “With all due respect, we have had enough conversations in which you agreed with Bill C-10. You wanted to help us improve the legislation. You know that the legislation does not target social media users and does not limit freedom of expression. The cultural community is counting on you to explain this to your Conservative Party colleagues and stop the grandstanding. Our cultural future and the French language are at stake, as well as our production capacity. Do not let us down.”

Unfortunately, the Conservative Party has let down our artists and Quebec and Canadian culture.

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Conservative

Alain Rayes Conservative Richmond—Arthabaska, QC

Mr. Speaker, that is incredible and I feel like laughing when I listen to the heritage minister.

He is rejecting the advice of all the experts in the country who have spoken out since the start of the week. He is attempting to defend the indefensible. Let us be clear, Bill C-10 does not regulate copyright, nor does it ensure that web giants pay their due and it does not revisit the role of CBC/Radio-Canada.

With the surprise amendments he made to Bill C-10 last week without warning, he is giving the CRTC more power by allowing it to censor everyday social media users. That is the reality.

Why is the minister bent on heading in this direction and why is he not listening to the experts once and for all?

Canadian HeritageOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Laurier—Sainte-Marie Québec

Liberal

Steven Guilbeault LiberalMinister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, I would like to quote the chair of the Coalition for the Diversity of Cultural Expressions who, in responding to the member, reminded him that for 50 years the CRTC has never regulated content on radio or television and has never restricted freedom of expression in broadcasting.

The law does not allow the CRTC to do that and yet the Conservative Party of Canada is the only entity to continue to spread this false news, misinformation and political rhetoric. It is appalling.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Desilets Bloc Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, the tax filing deadline has passed, and victims of CERB fraud are worried. They should not have to pay taxes on money that they did not apply for and did not receive. That seems obvious to me.

However, the Canada Revenue Agency is telling people to pay now and that an investigation will be done. If they were indeed the victim of fraud, they will be reimbursed.

Instead, could the minister tell victims that it is not their fault, that they do not have to pay anything before the investigations are completed, and that they will not be penalized in any way?

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I want to assure my hon. colleague that the number of returns filed so far is comparable to pre-pandemic years.

I remind Canadians that although personal income tax season is over, they should file their returns as soon as possible so that they do not experience any disruption in their benefits.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Desilets Bloc Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, I guess that was an answer.

This time, the minister needs to give the victims a straight answer.

She could have extended the tax deadline to allow for an investigation. That is obvious, but she refused to do it.

She could have been clear and told people to wait before paying taxes on fraudulent payments, but she refused to be clear with the victims.

People saw what a disaster the Phoenix pay system was. They do not really want to send a cheque to Ottawa based on a promise of reimbursement, because they fear it could take years to get their money back.

Why does the minister refuse to take the victims' side?

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:35 p.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I remind my colleague that the Canada Revenue Agency has said that people who were victims of fraud will not have to reimburse the government.

In addition, there will be no interest or penalties until April 2022 for people who file their tax returns.

I encourage people to file their returns so that they can get the credits and benefits they are entitled to.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Bloc

Luc Desilets Bloc Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, QC

Mr. Speaker, last year, Revenu Québec collected more money from tax havens thanks to information in the Panama papers than the Canada Revenue Agency collected in all of Canada.

I have a suggestion for the minister. Rather than harassing victims of CERB fraud, as she is doing now, perhaps she could leave them alone until the investigations are complete and focus her energy on tax havens, instead of ruining the lives of honest people.

Canada Revenue AgencyOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Gaspésie—Les-Îles-de-la-Madeleine Québec

Liberal

Diane Lebouthillier LiberalMinister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I am extremely disappointed to hear the Bloc Québécois asking people not to file their tax returns and depriving the most vulnerable of the credits to which they would be entitled.

Speaking of the Panama papers, I also want to inform my colleague that 900 Canadians have been identified, 160 audits are under way and over 200 audits have been completed. We are on the right track.

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, in a press conference given moments ago, NACI recommended mRNA vaccines over the AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson vaccines, saying that, given reports of blood clotting, individuals should be able to make an informed choice on whether they should wait to take an mRNA vaccine. A representative from NACI actually said they do not know how common the incidents of blood clotting are with those two vaccines, suggesting that the incidents might be as high as one in 100,000.

Therefore, what does Health Canada advise? This is different than what we have been hearing. Does Health Canada advise taking the first vaccine offered or to wait, if one can, for an mRNA vaccine?

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, first of all, I would like to thank NACI for its ongoing work in helping provinces and territories determine how to deliver the vaccines that are approved for use in Canada.

As the member opposite might realize from listening to witness testimonies at the health committee, Health Canada is responsible for approving vaccines for use in Canada and has given specific use requirements. NACI then takes the evidence and provides advice on how best to administer it. If any Canadian is questioning whether a vaccine is right for them, the best place to get information is from their health care professional.

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, that is going to leave a lot of Canadians even more confused than the press conference that just happened, so I will ask again because the minister is responsible for Health Canada.

NACI is saying that individuals should be able to make an informed choice on whether they should take AstraZeneca or Johnson & Johnson or wait for an mRNA vaccine, but the minister has been saying to take the first vaccine that is offered. Therefore, what is the advice from Health Canada? Is it for Canadians to take the first vaccine that is offered, no matter what it is, or is it to, if they can because they work from home or for whatever reason, wait for an mRNA vaccine? What is it?

HealthOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Thunder Bay—Superior North Ontario

Liberal

Patty Hajdu LiberalMinister of Health

Mr. Speaker, it is somewhat disconcerting to see the member opposite trying to instill a fear of our health care institutions, which of course guide patients toward the best medication for them. These vaccines are being delivered by health care professionals who know how to screen, ask the correct questions and determine which vaccine is indeed the best for that particular patient.

For the member to imply that patients would not get that expert advice from their medical professionals shows a lack of confidence in all of our provincial and territorial partners, who are doing so much work to ensure that Canadians get the right vaccine for them.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Conservative

Pierre Paul-Hus Conservative Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, today we found out that the chair of the defence committee cancelled today's meeting on the instructions of her Prime Minister.

Her disregard for the parliamentary process is clear, because she did not even provide committee members a reason for the cancellation. This is another shameful attempt by the Liberals to cover up the Prime Minister's inaction on sexual misconduct at the Canadian Armed Forces.

From one lieutenant-colonel to another, will the chair of the defence committee allow Katie Telford to come testify before the committee?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:40 p.m.

Vancouver South B.C.

Liberal

Harjit S. Sajjan LiberalMinister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I have all the respect for the work done—

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Ah, fuck, did you send it to Sajjan?

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, Oh!

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Order, please.

I am not sure exactly where that language came from, but I believe we as parliamentarians deserve an apology.

Order, please.

I believe the government House leader has something to bring up.

National DefenceOral Questions

2:45 p.m.

Liberal

Pablo Rodriguez Liberal Honoré-Mercier, QC

Mr. Speaker, as my colleagues mentioned, I am the one who used unacceptable language. I apologize.