House of Commons Hansard #133 of the 44th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was court.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

Before we start today, the hon. member for Timmins—James Bay will lead us in the singing of the national anthem.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Lebanese Independence DayStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Lena Metlege Diab Liberal Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, yesterday evening, full of pride for my homeland and the country I love, we gathered to mark the 79th anniversary of Lebanon's independence.

I want to sincerely thank all parliamentarians, senators, members of the diplomatic corps and everyone who came yesterday.

Lebanese people have contributed to the Canadian mosaic since the 1880s. I have heard from Canadians from across the country about their deep connections to the Lebanese communities in their regions since I introduced my private member's bill to designate November as Lebanese heritage month. In a few hours, I will appear before the social affairs committee in the other place and speak about the value of such a designation.

The special relationship between our nations is rooted in our shared democratic values, and Canada has always stepped up to help Lebanon in its time of need. In the face of hardship, now is such a time.

As I said yesterday, our faith is very strong that the sun will shine again, and our paradise Lebanon will be more beautiful than ever.

Municipal ElectionsStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Cheryl Gallant Conservative Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, ON

Mr. Speaker, over the years, I have had the opportunity to work with selfless, hard-working individuals representing 20 local councils in my riding of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, and this past municipal term was no exception. I thank current councillors who either decided to retire at the end of this term or were not successful. Politics is an unforgiving business, so cherish the honour.

I thank all who stepped up and put their names forth in this election. It is a big commitment, and their community thanks them for it. Individuals who ran and were unsuccessful should take this opportunity to serve their communities in other ways. The need is always there. For candidates who were successful, welcome to public office, and welcome back returning councillors.

New councillors are now being sworn in for the start of a new term in office and the task begins. As their federal representative for the valley, my door is always open. I look forward to working with all members of council.

Congratulations and good luck.

Poppy Campaign in OrléansStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Marie-France Lalonde Liberal Orléans, ON

Mr. Speaker, on October 28, I had the honour to attend the official launch of the poppy campaign conducted by the Orléans Royal Canadian Legion Branch 632.

I want to thank Canadian Tire owner Claude L'Heureux for his welcome and for partnering with our legion.

Today, I am pleased to announce that our local Orléans poppy campaign has collected more than $120,000. I would like to thank everyone who donated for their generosity.

All of the donations received during the campaign will go to supporting veterans and their families.

I must recognize the immense dedication and work by volunteers who supported the different points of sale in our community, and I recognize our local businesses for their continuous efforts to ensure success by allowing the Legions to have a kiosk on site.

Leading up to Remembrance Day, poppies were seen in every corner across Canada. They show support and display remembrance, and they carry a wealth of history and meaning with them.

Lest we forget.

Oka Secondary School Initiative to Stop Violence Against WomenStatements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Jean-Denis Garon Bloc Mirabel, QC

Mr. Speaker, on October 31, students of the secondary school in Oka took action to raise awareness among their peers. During a spooky haunted mansion tour on Halloween, nine young girls in black capes held a tombstone with the names of Quebec's most recent femicide victims. At the end of the tour, there was a banner that read, “Were you afraid? We don't want to spend our whole lives being afraid”. Eight hundred people signed the banner in a show of support.

On November 4, I met with these young 13- and 14-year-olds, who wanted to send a message to us, parliamentarians, because we have the power to change things.

Does it seem normal that, every day, in 2022, a woman wonders whether she will be next? That is absolutely unbelievable. I would like to invite members from all parties to join their voices to mine and to those of the students and staff members who supported their initiative.

Let us stand in solidarity against violence towards women. Not one more.

National Addictions Awareness WeekStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Élisabeth Brière Liberal Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, this is National Addictions Awareness Week. It is an opportunity for Canadians to learn more about addictions, to talk openly about prevention, treatment and recovery, and to reduce the stigma surrounding substance use.

This year's theme, “A Community of Caring”, is very important. It highlights the community's efforts to reduce the stigma associated with addiction and to promote the idea that people with addictions should be treated with compassion, respect and empathy.

It is very disappointing to see that the Leader of the Opposition released a video this week in which he spreads misinformation. It is irresponsible and dangerous. Even Stephen Harper's former public safety advisor called the video a rehash of Conservative tropes from the discredited war on drugs, which was proven to be ineffective, as well as costly and deadly.

We cannot return to the failed Conservative ideology. It will cost lives.

Employment InsuranceStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Jacques Gourde Conservative Lévis—Lotbinière, QC

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the government of Bill C‑215 on employment insurance, which seeks to increase from 15 to 52 the number of weeks of sickness benefits for cases of serious illness, such as cancer. I would also remind the government that just 15 weeks of assistance is no longer enough to give Canadians financial security. This bill was passed by the House and reflects its will to provide those additional weeks. It would resolve the problem of economic protection for generations.

I also want to point out that the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities voted unanimously in favour of allowing the bill to reach third reading stage. According to parliamentary procedure, we need a royal recommendation from the government to finalize passage of the bill.

Bill C‑215 is an example what the Canadian Parliament and all parliamentarians can do by working together, in the best interests of all Canadians.

Let us be attentive and compassionate towards one another to build a better world here in Canada.

HMCS OakvilleStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Pam Damoff Liberal Oakville North—Burlington, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to take a moment to highlight Canada History Week and shine the spotlight on Lieutenant Sean Livingston. Sean is a history teacher, sea cadet instructor, Oakville naval reserve officer, naval historian and author of Oakville's Flower: The History of HMCS Oakville. His book and recently launched exhibit at Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre highlight the history of the HMCS Oakville and the heroic actions of its crew in the attempted capture and sinking of U-94 in the Caribbean on August 28, 1942.

Sean's story follows the HMCS Oakville through its rise and fall as a Canadian naval legend, to its revival in the town of Oakville. In recording Canada's naval history, Sean safeguards its legacy.

The exhibit in Oakville is open until September 17, 2023. Come visit to see first-hand some of Canada's naval history and an important part of Oakville's history.

Student SupportStatements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Irek Kusmierczyk Liberal Windsor—Tecumseh, ON

Mr. Speaker, this week I had a chance to meet Mackenzy, Rose, Stevie and Rohin, who are part of a delegation of close to 100 students and representatives of CASA and the Quebec Student Union on Parliament Hill this week. They are meeting with MPs and ministers to advocate for students.

Their voices and hard work have been critical to the strong partnership with our federal government that is helping more students attend post-secondary education and helping more students fulfill their potential, whether through creating the Canada emergency student benefit, doubling Canada student grants, eliminating the interest on federal student loans or improving the repayment assistance plan.

More than direct student supports, the voice of CASA and QSU has been vital across all aspects of our government's work: creating $10-a-day child care, passing dental and rental support, and making historic investment in public transit and affordable housing.

There is more work ahead, but our partnership with CASA and QSU will continue to deliver for all students everywhere.

Attack in JerusalemStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Melissa Lantsman Conservative Thornhill, ON

Mr. Speaker, today we learned about a cowardly, heinous terrorist attack in Jerusalem, where 19 innocent civilians were injured and a 16-year-old Canadian boy was murdered. His name was Aryeh Shchupak, and may his memory be a blessing.

Two coordinated terrorist bombings evoke painful memories of the deadly second intifada. It is chilling to think that there are terrorists celebrating this attack on civilians, casually chanting in the streets and online and calling for a third. Canadians should ask themselves why there are celebrations and treats being handed out in parts of the Gaza Strip when innocent civilians are murdered.

The government must take an unequivocal stand against terror everywhere and condemn this attack for what it is: hate-fuelled terror to kill Jews. They murdered a Canadian.

I hope that every member of the House will join me in condemning this attack and standing with Israel to protect our foundational principles, the ones we all hold dear.

Youth EngagementStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Adam van Koeverden Liberal Milton, ON

Mr. Speaker, this past Sunday was National Child Day, and I am proud to stand today to highlight and encourage youth engagement across our country.

Young people are not just the leaders of the future; they are leading conversations and advocacy today. Youth voices are pushing forward discussions on education, public safety, climate action, sport, physical activity, recreation and our health care systems. Whether those voices are from student school trustees, young people who join campaigns and knock on doors for candidates they believe in or young people who join advocacy days on the Hill or peacefully protest, youth voices matter.

The youth who fight for causes they believe in while rejecting political cynicism and apathy may not have a vote in our democratic system, but they do have voices, and strong ones. Their efforts are creating positive changes right across Canada. I am talking about the kids in Kat Putzig's civics class from CKSS in Milton, whom I visited two weeks back, and the kids from Hitherfield School in Campbellville and all the others across our nation. Keep it up.

I loved visiting schools when I was an athlete, and it continues to be an important part of my work as an MP. I am inspired by the activism of all young people and am encouraged by their dedication to making our communities and country stronger.

Food SecurityStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, fall harvest is in full swing in southwestern Ontario, and farmers are sharing with me their shocking natural gas and propane invoices.

Canadian farmers are faced with the financial burden of the carbon tax as they undertake necessary practices, such as drying grains, heating livestock barns and irrigating crops. One producer in my riding is paying over $11,000 in carbon tax just in one month, in October, to dry corn on their home farm. These producers are asking where the federal government thinks Canadian farmers are going to recover these dollars.

Farmers are already facing a challenging year with a tariff on fertilizer, the increased cost of inputs and production and the increase of the carbon tax on April 1. Producing food in Canada is becoming unfeasible. The carbon tax is a threat to Canada's food security and will continue to raise the cost of food for all Canadians. The government needs to give farmers relief and suspend the carbon tax.

I implore the Liberals to listen to farmers, axe the carbon tax and make Canada's food security a priority.

Indigenous Services CanadaStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Jamie Schmale Conservative Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week the Auditor General released a damning report on the complete failure at Indigenous Services Canada to provide the support first nations communities need to manage emergencies such as floods and wildfires.

This follows a warning from the Parliamentary Budget Officer just last May about the declining competency of ISC to manage budgets and actually meet goals. The report found that ISC provided money for coordinators without knowing what effect, if any, it would have. It spent three and a half times more responding and recovering from emergencies rather than approving some of the 112 indigenous-led projects that would help with mitigation and adaptation.

The department spent three years and $790,000 with not one emergency management agreement in place, which means there is a risk some communities might not receive the help they need during a crisis.

The department is utterly failing indigenous communities and putting lives at risk. Conservatives are focused on ending this “Ottawa knows best” approach and bringing forward policies that help make real and measurable improvements to the lives of indigenous people.

The FrancophonieStatements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Arielle Kayabaga Liberal London West, ON

Mr. Speaker, the 18th Francophonie Summit in Djerba just wrapped up, but efforts to fight the decline of French here in Canada and around the world are more important than ever. Canada remains a major player and has reiterated its steadfast commitment to ongoing sustainable development in French-speaking areas. Both nationally, with Bill C‑13, and internationally, our government is still a leader in that regard. There are currently 321 million French speakers around the world. It is the fifth most commonly spoken language in the world and the fourth most common language on the Internet.

I would like to conclude by congratulating Louise Mushikiwabo on being re-elected as head of the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie and on all of the organization's hard work. We reaffirm our support for her and for the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

Sheila RisbudStatements by Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Heather McPherson NDP Edmonton Strathcona, AB

Mr. Speaker, defending and promoting French in Alberta are vital to my province and to my riding, Edmonton Strathcona. Sheila Risbud announced last month that she would be stepping down as president of the Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta. I want to thank Sheila for her wonderful leadership skills and her many years of commitment. She will be greatly missed. However, thanks to several brilliant and exceptional women, the defence and promotion of French are in good hands.

I want to extend a big thank you to Sheila and to all these amazing women for their hard work.

Post-Secondary EducationStatements by Members

November 23rd, 2022 / 2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Maxime Blanchette-Joncas Bloc Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, QC

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to recognize that the Quebec Student Union is on the Hill today. These students have come here to share their ideas on how we can help them deal with inflation and the challenges of the post-pandemic world. On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I would like to welcome them.

We hear a lot about how inflation is affecting people on fixed incomes, but graduate students, whose livelihoods depend on scholarships, are often overlooked. In 2023 it will be 20 years since graduate research fellowships were last indexed. As a result, Canada is the only G7 country that is losing researchers because of the financial insecurity they face. Boosting research fellowships is a worthwhile investment, since it supports these researchers in inflationary times, encourages innovation and curbs the brain drain.

Ottawa has not been there to support students, and it is turning its back on the next generation of Quebec scientists. Let us work together to change that.

Government PrioritiesStatements by Members

2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Larry Brock Conservative Brantford—Brant, ON

Mr. Speaker, every day Canadians cannot help but feel like everything in this country is broken. Since the Liberals took office, we have witnessed a 32% increase in violent crime and a 92% increase in gang-related killings. Just in the last two years, hate crimes have gone up by 73%.

Not-for-profit organizations in my community are working overtime as the state of our country had 1.5 million Canadians going to a food bank. Not only has home ownership become unimaginable for many residents in my community and those across Canada, but rental costs are also soaring and are now averaging at least $2,000 a month.

Over the last seven years, everything the Prime Minister has touched breaks. As Conservatives, we will pick up the pieces the government has left behind. On this side of the House we will focus on replacing suffering with opportunity, prioritizing common sense solutions, giving Canadians back control of their lives and turning hurt into hope.

Canadian Men's Soccer TeamStatements by Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Ruby Sahota Liberal Brampton North, ON

Mr. Speaker, today is a special and exciting day for Canada and Canadian soccer fans throughout our nation. Canada's men's national team is playing its first World Cup match today against Belgium. When it comes to supporting our teams on the world stage, no one does it better than we Canadians.

It has been 36 years since we as a country have been able to experience this amazing moment, and I can only imagine what this means for the players who have fought and worked so hard to earn their place in the World Cup.

I want to give a special shout-out to the seven outstanding Brampton soccer players on the team: Atiba Hutchinson, Jonathan Osorio, Cyle Larin, Tajon Buchanan, Junior Hoilett, Iké Ugbo and Liam Millar. Brampton is proud to have them on the roster, representing our nation. It must be true that there is something in that Brampton water.

I am sure my fellow colleagues would love to join me in wishing the Canadian men's national team the best of luck today and through all its World Cup matches. Go, Canada, go.

Democratic InstitutionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister said, “we're seeing that countries, state actors from around the world, whether it's China or others, are continuing to play aggressive games with our institutions, with our democracies”.

What aggressive games is he referring to?

Democratic InstitutionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, whether it is Russian disinformation concerning its role in Ukraine, Chinese interference in communities, the diaspora and the media, or the Iranian government putting pressure on Iranian Canadians, we remain vigilant in order to protect Canadians from interference from countries around the world.

Democratic InstitutionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister met with the Chinese president, and his office said he “raised our serious concerns around interference activities in Canada.”

Was the Prime Minister ever briefed about any of these “interference activities” that the Prime Minister says went on in Canada?

Democratic InstitutionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, I am regularly briefed by intelligence officials and security experts on threats to Canada and Canadians.

Whether it be cyber-threats, whether it be interference with Canadian diaspora communities, whether it be the use of online misinformation or disinformation, there is a range of threats out there that Canadians and Canadian security agencies continue to be vigilant against.

We will always be there to protect Canadians.

Democratic InstitutionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, what specific interference was the Prime Minister referring to when he raised his “serious concerns around interference” with the Chinese president?

Democratic InstitutionsOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Papineau Québec

Liberal

Justin Trudeau LiberalPrime Minister

Mr. Speaker, we have known for many years that there are consistent engagements by representatives of the Chinese government in Canadian communities and with local media, as well as reports of illicit Chinese police stations. These are all things that we continue to be concerned about, that our officials stay active on and that we will continue to be vigilant around to keep Canadians safe.

Carbon PricingOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

The Prime Minister continues to ignore the crisis that Canadian households are about to face with the skyrocketing home heating bills. They are expected to double in many communities. Some households will be stuck paying $5,000 to $6,000 a year, yet he wants to not just maintain but triple his carbon tax on Canadians.

He might play a game of delaying the implementation in a few provinces, but why would he not take decisive action to reverse the damage he has caused to all Canadians and all of their homes, by reversing the carbon tax on home heating altogether?