House of Commons Hansard #104 of the 44th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was federal.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

The Speaker Liberal Anthony Rota

It being Wednesday, the hon. member for South Okanagan—West Kootenay will lead us in the singing of the national anthem.

[Members sang the national anthem]

Hurricane FionaStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Green

Elizabeth May Green Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, as we know, our friends, our colleagues and, as in my case, being a Cape Bretoner, our families are recovering from hurricane Fiona.

We know that five Canadian provinces were walloped with one storm. Now that is a record. We also know that as we show, speak to and, in an emergency debate, declare our solidarity with the people of Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Quebec that we do so with a commitment that this is not just a story of the moment. As what happened to my colleagues and friends in interior B.C. from Lytton to Spences Bridge into Vancouver and Abbotsford, we must not turn the page when the story is over. We must stay with them until their lives are restored.

May hurricane Fiona confirm our commitment to resilience in communities and to fighting against the climate crisis.

British Home Child DayStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Yvan Baker Liberal Etobicoke Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to mark the fifth British Home Child Day in Canada.

From 1869 to 1948, over 100,000 British children were sent to Canada from Great Britain. Some of the children were orphans, but most were from destitute families or from families who had fallen on very difficult times due to sickness or death. Some of the children were even sent to Canada without their parents’ consent.

The children sent to Canada often found themselves in indentured servitude on farms or as domestic labourers. Many home children were very poorly treated and many faced cruel abuse. Many home children would go on to make significant contributions to Canada, including serving in our armed forces and fighting for freedom around the world.

Today, it is thought that more than 10% of the Canadian population may be descended from British home children. That would mean that about four million Canadians today are descendants of the British home children. Today, I hope that we reflect on and commemorate the British home children, what they lived through and endured, and the contributions that they and their descendants have made to Canada.

Constitution of SlovakiaStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Conservative

Michelle Rempel Conservative Calgary Nose Hill, AB

Mr. Speaker, 30 years ago the Constitution of the Slovak Republic was adopted.

In three short decades Slovakia has emerged from the shadow of forced communism as a vibrant, thriving democracy with a strong economy and a very bright future. Slovakia also borders Ukraine and has recently provided tremendous support for refugees and taken a strong stand against tyranny and oppression.

For these reasons and because of the vibrant Slovak diaspora community in Canada, it is vitally important for Canada to have strong ties between our nations. I acknowledge and support the government's recent announcement of expansion to a full embassy in Slovakia.

As a Canadian with Slovak heritage and the chair of the Canada-Slovakia Friendship Group, I want to extend warm congratulations on this remarkable 30-year anniversary of Constitution Day in Slovakia and celebrate the strengthened ties between our nations.

Na zdravie.

Hurricane FionaStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Bobby Morrissey Liberal Egmont, PE

Mr. Speaker, most Canadians have been watching the impact of a changing destructive climate, but many Atlantic Canadians are not because they do not have access to basic infrastructure.

P.E.I. was hit with the most destructive hurricane I have ever seen. In my riding of Egmont, the impact has been devastating, including the Évangéline school, farm buildings and crops, small craft harbours, fishers' gear and much more. Many Islanders are struggling right now, and it is our job to lighten that burden as quickly as possible.

Our community has been resilient in the face of this tragedy, and I am proud to say that the community has come together to face these challenges together. I would like to recognize the efforts of municipalities and not-for-profit organizations, which have worked tirelessly to support their neighbours with basic necessities, and the tireless work of our first responders and utility workers, as well as hydro crews from across Canada.

Together we are stronger, and together we will get through this.

British Home Child DayStatements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Alexis Brunelle-Duceppe Bloc Lac-Saint-Jean, QC

Mr. Speaker, September 28 is British Home Child Day. This day is dedicated to the memory of the more than 100,000 British children brought to Canada as indentured labourers between 1869 and 1932. The British home children, as they would come to be known, were under the age of 17. Most were between the ages of seven and 14, but some were just toddlers.

These young children were sent to Canada, most of them without their parents' consent. As soon as they arrived in Canada, the British home children were sent to foster homes. Unfortunately, some of those children were abused and mistreated. Various heartbreaking stories have come to light.

Most of the children were sent to Ontario, but others went to Manitoba, the Maritimes, British Columbia and Quebec. It is estimated that there are over four million descendants of these children living in Canada today. My great-grandfather John James Rowley was one of them.

On this September 28, let us honour their memory.

Teresa Dellar Palliative Care ResidenceStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Francis Scarpaleggia Liberal Lac-Saint-Louis, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Teresa Dellar Palliative Care Residence, named in honour of its founder, is a leader in providing high quality end-of-life care.

The residence, funded by the generosity of donors and supported by dedicated volunteers, occupies a unique place on the West Island of Montreal.

Teresa left a priceless and inspiring legacy. She left us far too soon, but her memory and spirit inspire us to pursue her vision of a more caring society where people's dignity is respected in their final days.

The residence's annual “run for compassion” took place last Saturday, under a beautiful blue sky, raising $195,000 and breaking all previous fundraising records.

I want to congratulate all the participants and over 100 volunteers who gave their time, as well as Deb Elvidge, who initiated this event six years ago in memory of her father.

U.S.-Canada BorderStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Alex Ruff Conservative Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, in April 2021, I asked the Liberal government what procedures were in place to ensure all Canadians, including those without Internet or phone access, have the necessary information to cross the U.S.-Canada border, request quarantine exemptions for compassionate reasons and more.

I specifically asked on behalf of constituents who are from Amish and Mennonite communities who are dual citizens and constitutionally protected to enter both countries. I would remind the government that the Amish do not have cars, telephones or computers or use the Internet, nor do they use the Canadian universal health care or education systems. However, they do pay property, education and income taxes. They do not vote during public elections.

In February, I asked the government how they were notifying all Canadians about the constantly changing and often confusing travel restrictions or requirements. The written response outlines how changes were shared on the Internet, but it does not answer how this was shared with those Canadians without Internet or television. Members of the Amish community in my riding now face over $250,000 in fines as a community for failure to comply with these Liberal government requirements.

Do the members of the government think this is fair? If not, what are they going to do to rectify the situation?

John A. YoungStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Andy Fillmore Liberal Halifax, NS

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honour the life and legacy of John A. Young, a legendary Haligonian lawyer, community builder and long-serving honorary colonel in the Halifax Rifles.

John's legacy of service to our region lives on all around us, as does the memory of his prodigious intellect and sharp wit. John was among the first partners and managing partner of BoyneClarke LLP, where he helped to grow the small law firm into the fourth-largest in Atlantic Canada.

John was also a savvy political player whose passion for politics brought him here to Parliament Hill as executive assistant to the deputy prime minister, Nova Scotia's own Allan J. MacEachen. Later, he would serve as president of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party.

Over his life, John tirelessly served his country and his community on countless boards and commissions, but he and his wife Carol always held a special place in their hearts for children's camp Brigadoon Village.

John was one of my earliest supporters in political life, someone whose wise counsel I called upon often. He was a giant among us and we will miss him tremendously. I extend my deepest condolences to Carol and to all who loved him.

100th Anniversary of Easter SealsStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Rob Oliphant Liberal Don Valley West, ON

Mr. Speaker, Easter Seals is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year, representing 100 years of advocacy, support and service for hundreds of thousands of Canadians living with disabilities in our country.

With its head office in Don Valley West, Easter Seals is Canada's largest local provider of programs and services for the disability community. Easter Seals provides summer camps, scholarships, employment programs, accessibility services and so much more to over 46,000 Canadians each year.

Celebrations have been held coast to coast to coast marking this momentous occasion. This year, the Easter Seals executive, some of the amazing youth ambassadors and the board of directors are in Ottawa for a national 100th anniversary celebration.

I want to thank the board, the ambassadors, the staff and volunteers from all over our great country for their advocacy and for their work. I congratulate them on this significant milestone. We look forward to the next 100 years.

Canadian FarmersStatements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Conservative

Lianne Rood Conservative Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, ON

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to represent my community of Lambton—Kent—Middlesex, which is a rural farming community. Like my family, many of my constituents, friends and neighbours are farmers who work hard each and every day to feed Canada and the world. They often work on tight timelines, working against Mother Nature to bring in the harvest.

With Thanksgiving upon us, I would like to remind everyone that the food we will all be enjoying on our tables comes from the hard work of our farming families, not just from the grocery store. If we want to secure local, healthy food to eat, we need to support Canadian farm families, growers and producers. After all, “No Farms, No Food”.

That is why today and every day we should all be thankful for our farmers and give them the support they need. This Thanksgiving, I urge members to take time to thank a farmer and learn from them how we can support food sovereignty in Canada.

Happy Thanksgiving to everyone in Lambton—Kent—Middlesex and beyond. I thank farmers for all they do to feed us.

International Safe Abortion DayStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Hedy Fry Liberal Vancouver Centre, BC

Mr. Speaker, I address this House on behalf of the Canadian Association of Parliamentarians for Population and Development.

Today, on International Safe Abortion Day, I want to recognize the tireless efforts of health care providers and community groups across Canada and globally who work to support the full spectrum of sexual and reproductive health and human rights.

Globally, 45% of abortions are unsafe. Unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal death and hospitalizes millions of individuals every year. Therefore, we welcome the 2022 World Health Organization's Abortion care guideline, which recommends full decriminalization and universal access to abortion and self-management options for birth control.

Canada must continue the life-saving work of increasing access to abortion care in our own country and championing the issue globally. Let us all commit to ending preventable deaths and illness from unsafe abortion worldwide.

Cost of LivingStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Eric Melillo Conservative Kenora, ON

Mr. Speaker, our new Conservative leader will put the people first: their paycheques, their savings, their homes and their country.

People feel like they are losing control of their pocketbooks and of their lives, as the government has doubled the national debt and is driving up the cost of everything. With prices on gas, groceries and other essentials skyrocketing, many people are struggling to get by. In fact, families are now downgrading their diets, seniors are watching their life savings evaporate with inflation, and many 30-year-olds are now trapped in their parents' basements because of housing costs.

These are fellow Canadian citizens. These are the people we have been sent here to serve, and they deserve much better. It is time this government got its inflationary spending under control, committed to no new taxes and gave struggling Canadians some much-needed hope.

British Home Child DayStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Conservative

Mark Strahl Conservative Chilliwack—Hope, BC

Mr. Speaker, from 1896 to 1948 the British Home Child program saw over 100,000 boys and girls shipped from the United Kingdom to Canada to serve mainly as cheap labour for the families they were placed with here. While some of these children were treated well, many others were seen as no more than indentured servants and suffered horrible abuse at the hands of those who were supposed to care for them.

In spite of this, many British home children would go on to serve Canada with distinction in the Canadian Forces throughout the 20th century. It is estimated that four million Canadians are descendants of British home children, including me. My great-grandfather, Sheriff Atcheson Thompson, came to this country as a British home child in 1915, at the young age of 12.

I would like to thank people like my grandma, Carol Bateman, who continue to keep the stories of British home children alive and who continue to call upon the government to apologize for the program these children suffered under. Today, on British Home Child Day, let us pause to remember them and their legacy to our country.

John YoungStatements By Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Darren Fisher Liberal Dartmouth—Cole Harbour, NS

Mr. Speaker, as I rise, Nova Scotia is remembering and honouring a wonderful human being: Dartmouth’s John Young.

From an early age, John understood the importance of getting involved in politics, that the power of politics was about doing good and taking care of others. After graduating law school, he spent four years working alongside Liberal cabinet minister Allan MacEachen and had what he called a “fascinating education”. It was here in Ottawa that John met the love of his life, Carol. Together, this dynamic political duo helped shape politics back home in Nova Scotia for decades.

One would be hard pressed to find a current or former Liberal politician back home who has not received brilliant and caring advice from the Youngs. John had an incredible legal career, helping Boyneclarke grow from a modest little firm on Queen Street in Dartmouth into one of the largest law firms in Atlantic Canada.

John always gave more than he took, and I can tell members that John’s absence is already being felt deeply in our community, and especially by Liberals across Nova Scotia. I ask all members of this House to join me in honouring John Young.

Ovarian CancerStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

NDP

Bonita Zarrillo NDP Port Moody—Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, gender inequality costs lives.

Tomorrow, survivors and researchers from Ovarian Cancer Canada will be on Parliament Hill as part of their awareness month. I raise my hands to their work. Ovarian cancer has historically been under-researched due to gender bias, but with strong ongoing advocacy, awareness has been raised and new research is under way, which is also unlocking insights into this highly fatal disease.

Canada has an important challenge ahead to increase survival rates; we are not keeping pace with other countries on improving outcomes. Sadly, only 44% of people diagnosed with this cancer live more than five years. The journey with ovarian cancer is difficult, and the side effects of treatment interfere significantly with quality of life.

I want everyone living with or going through ovarian cancer to know that I see them and I see how strong they are.

Joyce EchaquanStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Bloc

Gabriel Ste-Marie Bloc Joliette, QC

Mr. Speaker, it was two years ago today.

It has been two years since the heartbreaking death of Joyce Echaquan; two years since her shocking, yet preventable death; two years since she recorded and streamed racism in its most tragic manifestation.

On behalf of the Bloc Québécois, I want to tell Joyce Echaquan's husband, Carol Dubé, her seven children and her loved ones that we stand with them as they gather to honour her memory in Manawan.

I want to tell all members of the Atikamekw community that we are with them, that we remember her, that we are with them in the fight against racism; against racism in all its forms, including within our institutions, as evidenced by so many accounts by first nations people.

Justice for Joyce, but also justice for all indigenous people in Quebec.

Let us continue to work together to ensure respect, dignity, security and empathy for everyone, whether Quebecker or Atikamekw, in society as well as in their relationship with the state.

Immigration, Refugees and CitizenshipStatements By Members

September 28th, 2022 / 2:20 p.m.

Conservative

Karen Vecchio Conservative Elgin—Middlesex—London, ON

Mr. Speaker, our new Conservative leader will put people first: their paycheques, their savings, their home and their country.

Trevor Neiman, director of digital economy and legal adviser of the Business Council of Canada, stated, “Immigrants often have the training, experience and qualifications to work in booming industries where Canada truly, desperately needs help, but newcomers are being denied a chance to contribute because of restrictive admission rules to these professions.” These are our doctors, nurses and engineers.

A combination of factors, such as the cost of living and recognizing core credentials and experience, is leading new immigrants to consider leaving Canada after resettling for only two years. Under our new Conservative leader, we will team up with the provinces to guarantee that within 60 days, an immigrant applying to work in their profession will get a yes or no based on their tested abilities, not based on where they came from.

Let us take action for all Canadians and remove these restrictions.

Ovarian CancerStatements By Members

2:20 p.m.

Liberal

Lena Metlege Diab Liberal Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, I want to raise awareness today of a devastating disease.

Ovarian cancer is a difficult beast, yet I have met so many inspiring Teal Sisters who have faced it. This is the most fatal cancer disease for women in Canada. It is difficult to detect and uniquely agile, with variations, mutations and migrations that can complicate treatment. While 3,100 Canadians are diagnosed each year, outcomes for patients have not improved for decades, which is why supporting research and fundraising is critical.

In 2020, my provincial government invested $1 million in ovarian cancer research, building on our federal government's first-ever $10-million investment in 2019. Earlier this month, I heard first-hand how that funding is supporting pioneering research at Dalhousie University.

I encourage colleagues to register for Ovarian Cancer Canada's Fall Symposium in November and learn more about the disease until we find a cure.

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, the cost of government is driving up the cost of living. The $500‑billion inflationary deficit has doubled our national debt. The Parliamentary Budget Officer said yesterday that Canadians will have to pay twice as much in interest on our national debt. They will end up paying $46 billion, which is more than the cost of the Canadian military.

The Liberals' solution is to increase taxes on seniors and workers. Will the government cap spending so that it can cancel its inflationary deficits and taxes that Canadians are paying for?

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as usual, the Conservatives are not bothering to even acquaint themselves with the facts. The facts show that the federal government is currently running a surplus of $6.3 billion. The IMF forecasts that Canada will have the lowest deficit in the G7 this year.

We have the lowest debt-to-GDP ratio in the G7 and our AAA credit rating was reaffirmed this year.

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, in fact, the Prime Minister has added more debt than all previous Canadian prime ministers combined and doubled the national debt. Those inflationary deficits have bid up the cost of the goods we buy and the interest we pay. Now, according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer, we will have to pay twice as much for interest on that national debt, $46 billion, which is more than the cost of the entire Canadian military. What is the Liberal solution? It is higher taxes on paycheques, gas, groceries and other expenses.

Why will the government not cap spending and cut waste so that it can cancel its inflationary deficits and taxes?

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, as usual, the Conservatives are not bothering to even acquaint themselves with the facts. Had they bothered to read the latest fiscal monitor, they would know that so far this fiscal year, the federal government is actually running a surplus of $6.3 billion. The IMF forecasts that Canada will have the lowest deficit in the G7 this year. We have the lowest debt-to-GDP ratio in the G7 this year, and our AAA credit rating was reaffirmed earlier this year.

We believe in fiscal responsibility, and that is why we are doing this.

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

Carleton Ontario

Conservative

Pierre Poilievre ConservativeLeader of the Opposition

Mr. Speaker, they are doubling what Canadians must spend on national debt interest, and they are tripling the carbon tax, tripling that tax on gas, heat, groceries and basically every good that has to be transported from one place to another. Now, at a time with 40-year highs in inflation, Liberals want to raise those taxes even further. Our young people who are going to school are living in homeless shelters because they cannot afford the cost of living.

Will the government cancel this heartless tax increase?

TaxationOral Questions

2:25 p.m.

University—Rosedale Ontario

Liberal

Chrystia Freeland LiberalDeputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, actually, for middle-class Canadians we have cut taxes and made them better off. Today, a single parent in Ontario with two kids under six and earning $60,000 a year pays nearly $5,600 less in taxes than she did under the Conservatives. She will receive nearly $8,900 more from reduced child care fees and the dental benefit. She will be more than $14,400 better off than she was under the Conservatives.