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Crucial Fact

  • Her favourite word was status.

Last in Parliament October 2015, as Conservative MP for London North Centre (Ontario)

Lost her last election, in 2015, with 31% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Aboriginal Affairs November 4th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, first let me be clear that these abhorrent acts of violence against aboriginal women and girls will not be tolerated in our society. Canada is a country where those who break the law are punished, where penalties match the severity of crimes committed, and where the rights of victims are recognized. That is why we committed in economic action plan 2014 to invest an additional $25 million over five years to continue efforts to reduce violence against aboriginal women.

On September 15, the Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women released the Government of Canada's action plan to address family violence and violent crimes against aboriginal women and girls. It responds to the call for action from families and communities, and addresses the recommendations of the Special Committee on Violence Against Indigenous Women. That is what our government is doing. It is taking action.

There are three main areas in which our government is taking action. First, the Government of Canada is taking action to prevent violence against aboriginal women and girls. Specific actions set out in the action plan include the development of more community safety plans across Canada, including in regions the RCMP's analysis has identified as having a high incidence of violent crime perpetrated against women and girls; projects to break intergenerational cycles of violence and abuse by raising awareness and building healthy relationships; and projects to engage men and boys and empower aboriginal women and girls to denounce and prevent violence.

Second, the Government of Canada is taking action to assist and support victims of violence. Specifically, the action plan supports family-police liaison positions to ensure that family members have access to timely information about cases, specialized assistance for victims and families, and positive relationships and the sharing of information between families and criminal justice professionals.

Third, the Government of Canada is taking action to protect aboriginal women and girls. Specifically, the action plan includes initiatives such as funding shelters on reserves on an ongoing basis, supporting the creation of a DNA-based missing persons index, and continuing to support police investigations through the National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains.

The Government of Canada will also continue to work closely with provinces and territories, police services and the justice system, as well as aboriginal families, communities, and organizations to address violence against aboriginal women and girls.

Violence Against Women November 4th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, Canada continues to watch with horror as women and girls are subject to unspeakable violence.

We cannot stand idly by as thousands of women are raped and sold into sexual slavery by the depraved gunmen that make up ISIL. We cannot sit quietly as we watch systemic rape be weaponized against women at war. We cannot close our eyes as Boko Haram boasts that it has forced the girls it kidnapped into marriage or as the Taliban shoot a young Pakistani girl in the head for wanting to go to school.

Women and children are not spoils of war. These disgusting acts are not limited to ISIL, Boko Haram and the Taliban, but are also increasingly perpetrated by extremists around the world who see educated women and girls as their greatest threat.

Canada must stand against it. Protecting and empowering women and children has been a priority of this government, and reports like these will only strengthen our resolve to combat these acts and terrorism in general.

Aboriginal Affairs October 30th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, in addition to the action plan's new funding, there is further funding of $158.7 million over five years beginning in 2015 for shelters and family violence prevention activities through Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

There will also be an internal dedication of funds, $5 million over five years, beginning in 2015, to improve economic security of aboriginal women and promote their participation in leadership and decision making roles through Status of Women Canada.

Taken all together, these measures outlined by the minister in the action plan represent a total investment of $196.8 million over five years, with some of these investments starting in 2015-16 and others in 2016-17.

As members can see, we on this side of the House are listening to Canadians and we are taking action on this very important issue.

Aboriginal Affairs October 30th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, let me be clear that the Government of Canada has been very clear that these abhorrent acts of violence against aboriginal women and girls will not be tolerated in our society.

Canada is a country where those who break the law are punished, where penalties match the severity of crimes committed, and where the rights of victims are recognized. That is why we committed, in the economic action plan 2014, to invest an additional $25 million over five years to continue in our efforts to reduce violence against aboriginal women.

On September 15 of this year, the Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women launched the Government of Canada action plan to address family violence and violent crimes against aboriginal women and girls. The action plan is designed to set out concrete actions to prevent violence, support aboriginal victims, and protect aboriginal women and girls from violence.

It includes new funding of $25 million over five years beginning in 2015-16, as well as renewed and ongoing support for shelters on reserve and family violence prevention activities.

The action plan's new funding of $25 million over five years has been allocated as follows: $8.6 million over five years for the development of more community safety plans across Canada, including in vulnerable communities with a high incidence of violent crimes perpetrated against women as identified by the RCMP's national operational overview; $2.5 million over five years for projects to break intergenerational cycles of violence and abuse by raising awareness and building healthy relationships; $5 million over five years for projects to engage men and boys, and empower women and girls in efforts to denounce and prevent violence; $7.5 million over five years to support aboriginal victims and families; and $1.4 million over five years to share information and resources with communities and organizations, and to report regularly on progress made and results achieved under the action plan.

It also reflects the 2014 economic action plan's commitment of $8.1 million over five years, starting in 2016-17 with $1.3 million per year ongoing to create a DNA-based missing persons index.

I should add that the Government of Canada's efforts complement the important work done by the provinces and territories, police, the justice system, and aboriginal families, communities and organizations to address violence against aboriginal women and girls.

Head Start for Young Women October 27th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to say that the city of London is one of six Canadian communities participating in the Federation of Canadian Municipalities head start for young women program. I am also proud to say that our government supported this project through Status of Women Canada.

As a part of this program, a documentary called 25% has been produced that encourages young women to participate in their community through politics and civic engagement. I fully support this initiative.

I, along with the Minister of Status of Women, was pleased to participate in this documentary. These efforts support one of the most important opportunities we have as a country: to empower women, young women and girls. Why? Because helping them make their voices heard will truly make a difference for themselves, their families and their communities.

I salute all the participants in this initiative in London and across the country who are helping our country take one more step towards equality.

Aboriginal Affairs October 10th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, our action plan brings together many measures to combat violence against aboriginal women and girls, and we on this side of the House are proud of it.

I am also proud that on October 11, Canada and the world is celebrating the International Day of the Girl. On this day, our government recognizes girls as powerful agents of change and leaders of today and tomorrow. This government, with the help of Plan Canada, has worked tirelessly to make the International Day of the Girl a reality and Canada led the international community of the United Nations in building support for establishing this day, which is now celebrated both domestically and internationally.

We on this side of the House are proud of the International Day of the Girl.

International Day of the Girl October 10th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, as Parliamentary Secretary for Status of Women, I would like to invite all Canadians to celebrate International Day of the Girl on October 11.

Each year, on this special day, we celebrate the hope and inspiration that girls and young women represent for our families, our communities, and our country.

This day also brings attention to the needs of girls throughout the world, who so often face violence and poverty, as well as inadequate education and health care.

That is why I am proud of the Government of Canada's leadership role in having the United Nations declare the International Day of the Girl.

On October 11, I hope that all Canadians will find ways to support and celebrate girls and young women on this unique and very special day.

Women Entrepreneurs October 1st, 2014

Mr. Speaker, October is Women's History Month in Canada. This year's theme, “Canadian Business Women—A Growing Economic Force”, encourages us to look at Canadian entrepreneurs.

Women have made vital contributions to business and entrepreneurship throughout our history, and this continues today. RBC Economics reports that in 2011, majority-owned women's businesses contributed an estimated $148 billion to the Canadian economy.

Throughout Women's History Month 2014, I invite all Canadians to discover and honour the accomplishments of women in business. Knowing this proud history can inspire enterprising women and girls across Canada to pursue opportunities in business and help build a stronger economy for all.

I am very proud of the women entrepreneurs in London, Ontario.

Business of Supply September 30th, 2014

Mr. Speaker, I inadvertently voted twice and my vote should be reflected as opposed.

Committees of the House September 23rd, 2014

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for his important speech on this issue.

I am very proud of this action plan and, together with other federal support for shelters, family violence prevention, and increasing economic leadership opportunities, it will result in an investment of the Government of Canada of $200 million over five years.

However, not everyone wants a national action plan. The Minister of Status of Women met with organizations and family members across the country. In my riding of London North Centre, At^lohsa Native Family Healing Services wrapped up a week of activities to honour sisters, daughters, and nieces who were taken too soon. Meg Cywink, a sister of Sonya Cywink, who was slain 20 years ago, said to forget a national inquiry; it would only create more paperwork. That is just one example.

The previous member, a Liberal member, asked something to the effect that, if a woman could not find a safe place, where would she go. If the Liberals had voted for Bill S-2, they would have a safe place; it is called a home.

My colleague and I were both on the committee together when we heard from the family members. Only one asked for a national inquiry at the end of her speech. Would my colleague not agree that the other family members wanted us to hear their stories and know their pain, and wanted Canadians to know who their—