House of Commons Hansard #114 of the 35th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was tax.

Topics

Health Care
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Reform

Keith Martin Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca, BC

Mr. Speaker, at the Liberal convention in October the Minister of Health said that the problems with our health care system have nothing to do with money and that better management is the answer.

In British Columbia hospitals, patients are being fed by volunteers because of cuts to nursing staff. Sick patients are being dumped out to home care and home care budgets are frozen.

We are going to put in $4 billion to restore health care funding. What is the minister going to do to ensure that these essential health care services will be funded properly?

Health Care
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Cape Breton—East Richmond
Nova Scotia

Liberal

David Dingwall Minister of Health

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member has made reference to statements I made at a convention of our party. I wish to share with the hon. member some statements: "Saskatchewan has a stronger health system today than it did four years ago. The provincial health spending has stabilized and better health services are now being provided". This was from the provincial minister of health in Saskatchewan.

In the province of Quebec, Mr. Rochon said on May 28, 1996 in the Medical Post : Less money can be devoted to health care while maintaining the same level of population health''. Dr. Rochon set a target of 8.5 per cent of gross domestic product as the level that Quebec's health care expenditures should not exceed.We can devote less money to that sector while maintaining accessibility of care in the level of the health of the population''.

These are provincial ministers of health who have the direct responsibility to deliver health care. It is not the Reform Party that should stand in this House and condemn provincial governments for the hard work they are trying to do to protect and enhance the health of Canadians. Shame on the Reform Party.

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

December 5th, 1996 / 3 p.m.

Reform

Jan Brown Calgary Southeast, AB

Mr. Speaker, I am appealing to the Secretary of State for Veterans to replace two memorial cross medals received posthumously during the second world war. The original medals were stolen in 1988 and the Will family in my riding is seeking to replace them.

I ask the Secretary of State for Veterans to demonstrate compassion for this family, to do the right thing and replace these medals given in recognition for two brothers who died on the European front in World War II. Will he do so?

Veterans Affairs
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Cardigan
P.E.I.

Liberal

Lawrence MacAulay Secretary of State (Veterans)(Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to get the details from the hon. member. If it is possible, I will see that the medals are returned to the family.

Canadian Airlines
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Liberal

John Nunziata York South—Weston, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question relates to the plight of Canadian Airlines.

Yesterday the Royal Bank announced record profits of close to $1.5 billion, the largest profit of any corporation in Canadian corporate history. The Royal Bank is also Canadian Airlines' lead banker. It has literally made tens of millions of dollars from Canadian Airlines.

Why are the workers at Canadian now being asked to kick in $15 to $20 a week? Can the government indicate what sacrifices the Royal Bank of Canada is making? What is the Royal Bank of Canada's contribution to the survival plans? Does he not believe the Royal Bank and other bankers and lenders have a social responsibility to ensure the viability of Canadian Airlines?

Canadian Airlines
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Victoria
B.C.

Liberal

David Anderson Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the difficulty of restructuring Canadian Airlines and turning it from a corporation which has had chronic losses year after year, totally $1.3 billion over the last decade, to a profitable corporation in the black requires corporate restructuring.

It also requires of course the creditors, including the Royal Bank, to take their share of that restructuring. It also requires to get the credibility of the corporation in front of those corporate creditors to have all in the Canadian family showing their willingness and determination to make the restructuring work.

That is why last week I went to Vancouver with two other governments, the Government of Alberta and the Government of British Columbia, with five unions and the company. We were working together to get to a common front to show that we were determined to allow restructuring to work.

Now that we have-

Canadian Airlines
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

The Speaker

That concludes question period.

Presence In Gallery
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Colleagues, I draw to your attention the presence in our gallery of His Excellency, Eduardo Stein, Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Republic of Guatemala.

Presence In Gallery
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Business Of The House
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Bloc

Gilles Duceppe Laurier—Sainte-Marie, QC

Mr. Speaker, could the government tell us what is on its legislative agenda for the coming week?

Business Of The House
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, today, tomorrow and Monday, if necessary, we will continue the second reading debate of Bill C-70, the sales tax harmonization bill. When this is concluded we will call Bill C-60, the food inspection legislation, followed by Bill C-23, the nuclear safety bill.

On Tuesday we plan to have the first day of the prebudget debate during normal sitting hours of the House. But discussions are taking place to permit a special debate in the evening on the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights on what I believe is its 50th anniversary.

The remainder of the week will be taken up by the second day of the prebudget debate and the legislation I have already mentioned. If there is an opportunity to consider other matters, we will discuss the agenda on the other side of the House. This concludes my weekly statement of government business.

Ways And Means
Oral Question Period

3:05 p.m.

Brant
Ontario

Liberal

Jane Stewart Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 83(1), I wish to table a notice of ways and means motion to amend the Income Tax Act, the Income Tax Application Rules and another act related to the Income Tax Act. I am also tabling explanatory notes.

I ask that an order of the day be designated for consideration of the motion.

The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill C-70, an act to amend the Excise Tax Act, the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, the Income Tax Act, the Debt Servicing and Reduction Account Act and related Acts, be read the second time and referred to a committee; and of the amendment.

Excise Tax Act
Government Orders

3:05 p.m.

Reform

Dick Harris Prince George—Bulkley Valley, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to have the opportunity to speak to Bill C-70 which deals with the GST harmonization in Atlantic Canada. The word harmonization reminds me of the song "I said it but I didn't really mean it", a very famous song.

It also gives me an opportunity to remind the Liberals in the House and, most important, their constituents, the Canadian taxpayers, of what was said on the campaign trail about the GST by the very Liberals who are sitting as the government today.

This is a little game called recall. First, let us recall the words of the Prime Minister when he was a candidate for the Liberal Party. He said: "We hate it and we will kill it". He did not say: "We hate it and we will harmonize it".

The Minister of Finance when he was campaigning as a Liberal candidate said: "I would abolish the GST". Pay careful attention to the word abolish. That means to get rid of, to lose sight of, to bury. That does not sound anything like: "I would harmonize the GST".

Our very own minister of defence said when he was a candidate: "The GST is a regressive tax. It has to be scrapped and, by golly, if we are elected to government, we will scrap it".

All across this country as the campaign went on Liberal candidate after Liberal candidate knocked on doors, spoke at public meetings and said in unison: "We will kill the GST. The Liberal Party will kill the GST if we become government in the next election". That is what they said. Everyone heard it. I was on radio shows with Liberal candidates and they could not wait to say "we will kill the GST".

It is sort of fun to go back in time and reminisce about what happened in the 1993 election. But there is a very serious part to all this. The bottom line is that the Liberal candidates in the 1993 election, prior to it, deliberately misled the Canadian people about what they were going to do with the GST. They deliberately misled the Canadian people.

Excise Tax Act
Government Orders

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I am sorry, I was otherwise disposed. Did the hon. member actually say "deliberately misled"? Did I misunderstand that?