House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

Government Expenditures
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, according to last week's supplementary estimates the government is planning to spend billions on some interesting projects including $4 million for millennium art projects; $22 million for new chanceries in Colombia, Haiti, Venezuela and South Korea; $3.2 million for senators; and $1 million for international environmental organizations. However the government has no money for hepatitis C victims and pepper sprayed APEC protesters. It cannot even give employers and employees a break from the burden of high EI premiums.

The government's list of priorities is shameful. It is literally throwing these estimates in the faces of those who justly deserve a break. Imagine hepatitis C victims reading that there is no money for them but the Liberals have millions of dollars for senators, and employers and employees finding that there is nothing for them but there are millions for arts projects.

It is time to reject these estimates. It is time for the President of the Treasury and the Minister of Finance to go back to the drawing board and start again.

Middle East
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Aileen Carroll Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, ON

Mr. Speaker, the conflict in the Middle East has had a long and torturous history. Therefore it is with great satisfaction that we learn of the ground breaking peace agreement at Wye, Maryland.

The Palestinian and Israeli leaders, with the instrumental support of the United States and the moral support of King Hussein of Jordan, worked courageously to achieve the breakthrough agreement. We trust it will lead to a resolution of the conflicts and provide a better life for future generations.

We are already hearing and seeing protests from opponents to the agreement, but we can only hope that they will not be successful in undermining this achievement.

The leaders of both the Palestinians and the Israelis have been working hard for many months to find a mutually agreeable solution while constantly being under the threat of failure.

As in Northern Ireland, the agreement is an important step toward building trust between longstanding rivals. Those who are outside this conflict now have an opportunity to provide support for a peaceful resolution.

First Job Fair
Statements By Members

2 p.m.

Liberal

Bernard Patry Pierrefonds—Dollard, QC

Mr. Speaker, it is with great pride that I rise today in this House to report on the first job fair, held in the West Island area of Montreal on October 30 and 31, 1998.

This job fair, with its 32 stands and 1,400 job offers, attracted more than 7,000 job seekers. I am also proud to say that 75% of the available positions were filled during the fair.

This shows the vitality of this part of the greater Montreal area and its significant and sustained economic growth. With more than 7,800 new jobs created in 1997, paying on average $32,000 a year, and the injection of $250 million in wages, there was an urgent need to bring together companies looking for workers and workers looking for jobs.

At this first job fair, our local youth employment centre rose to the challenge. I want to congratulate Gilles VanChesteing and his team at Trait d'Union for the excellent work they have done.

Remembrance Day
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Reform

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, whilst skies rained shells and proud men died, a soldier penned prose of bitter truths. His pen spoke out from the fields of war 83 years ago. He spoke for all that have faced their soul in the finality of the theatre of war.

Whether Korea, the gulf or two world wars, he could well be speaking of all brave men that have soldiered the world for Canadian beliefs.

World War I has long been gone but John McCrae's In Flanders Fields lives on. His words are carved in the walls of the House and are enduring as the threat of future wars.

For our honourable war veterans and remebered war dead we pause to give our respect. “If ye break faith with us who die, we shall not sleep”. Lest we forget.

Jacques Parizeau
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Raymonde Folco Laval West, QC

Mr. Speaker, former Quebec Premier Jacques Parizeau is now toeing the line and supporting Lucien Bouchard's strategy, after condemning it not too long ago.

This is a remarkable about-face since, as we know, Mr. Parizeau has always been anxious to achieve Quebec's separation from the rest of Canada. But, being a real trooper, Mr. Parizeau now supports the view that winning conditions must prevail before a referendum can be held.

A referendum on Quebec's separation from the rest of Canada remains the number-one priority for the PQ, and they will go to any lengths to achieve their goal.

Trade
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

NDP

Bill Blaikie Winnipeg—Transcona, MB

Mr. Speaker, by rejecting the MAI, France and other OECD nations have clearly acknowledged that we must not enshrine the interests of powerful corporations above the rights of working people, governments and the environment. By rejecting the MAI these nations rejected the NAFTA approach to investment.

By signing the NAFTA the Liberals made Canada the guinea pig for this flawed model. The result is the Ethyl case and those that will follow where foreign corporations are able to extract compensation if their profits are limited by legislation, no matter how legitimate that legislation may be.

After looking closely at the MAI and the Ethyl case, other countries are now scratching their heads as to why Canada ever agreed to sacrifice its sovereignty in this way.

Instead of looking for other venues in which to push the MAI such as the WTO or FTAA, the government should be rethinking the MAI and NAFTA and putting an end to our role as guinea pig for such unacceptable provisions.

L'Islet Association Of Unemployed People
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Bloc

Antoine Dubé Lévis, QC

Mr. Speaker, enough is enough.

On August 27, 1997, the Secretary of State for Agriculture asked the Minister of Human Resources Development to change the parent region of the L'Islet regional county municipality by integrating it into Quebec's eastern region, because of the difference in benefits for EI recipients.

At the time, the secretary of state said that the current unemployment rate in his riding was closer to the 17.9% rate for Quebec's eastern region than to the 8.1% global rate Statistics Canada assigned to the whole Chaudière—Appalaches region.

One year later, the L'Islet association of unemployed people is condemning the about-face of their member of Parliament and the human resources development minister's refusal to correct the injustice done to them.

The Bloc Quebecois feels that the unemployed in L'Islet deserve more respect and assures them of its support.

Election Campaign In Quebec
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Denis Coderre Bourassa, QC

Mr. Speaker, the weekend saw the Bloc Quebecois adding to the stakes in Quebec's upcoming election.

The member for Rimouski—Mitis insisted that there would indeed be a referendum during the next term of office, if Lucien Bouchard were re-elected.

She even set a deadline, saying that Mr. Bouchard would probably hold the referendum in 2001. Quebeckers now know what is riding on their vote November 30.

If they want to avoid another referendum, Quebeckers must vote for a stronger Quebec led by the provincial Liberal party.

Trans-Canada Highway
Statements By Members

2:05 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

David Price Compton—Stanstead, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Government of New Brunswick reneged on a contract with the Government of Canada and Quebec now finds itself paying the price, and a high one at that.

The Trans-Canada Highway through New Brunswick is the main link between the Magdalen Islands and the rest of Quebec. New Brunswick has announced that a toll booth would be set up on the section of the highway running between Moncton and Petitcodiac.

This section of the highway should be funded equally by the federal and the provincial governments. The provincial government has refused. Instead of paying its share, it will set up toll booths. If we end up with toll booths, it will be because the Government of Canada did not hold New Brunswick to the agreement.

On behalf of the people of Quebec, I call on the Minister of Transport to require New Brunswick to respect its obligations.

Reform Party Of Canada
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

John Finlay Oxford, ON

Mr. Speaker, imagine my surprise when I received a franked letter last week in my constituency office from the member for Esquimalt—Juan de Fuca.

My surprise stemmed from the fact the hon. member was using his postage privileges, paid for by the Canadian taxpayer, to inform me of the “evils” of the Liberal government. The information, clearly marked with the Reform Party logo, asked me to send my opinions to the hon. Leader of the Opposition.

I would like to take this opportunity to send my opinions directly to the Reform Party leader and his member: first, talk to me when Stornoway has been turned into a bingo hall; second, talk to me when Reform stops representing special interests like the gun lobby; and, third, cease sending misinformed propaganda to my door.

I am sure those on the opposition benches have heard my message loudly and clearly.

Federal-Provincial Conferences
Statements By Members

November 3rd, 1998 / 2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Bernard Bigras Rosemont, QC

Mr. Speaker, contrary to the federal Liberals' claims, since 1994 the Parti Quebecois government has been an active and faithful participant in federal-provincial meetings, far more so than the 1990-94 Liberal government.

The Bourassa and Johnson governments, in fact, attended only 53% of these meetings, while the Parizeau and Bouchard governments have attended 83%.

The empty chair policy is but a myth; the government of Quebec staunchly defends the interests of Quebec and its traditional demands. The specialist in non-presence is Jean Charest, he who is incapable of committing to the Calgary Declaration.

Along with his federal Liberal ally, Jean Charest, who is passing himself off as the saviour of Quebec, has nothing but hot air to offer the people of Quebec. This coming November 30, all of Quebec will let him know that this is unacceptable.

Government Appointments
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Reform

Gary Lunn Saanich—Gulf Islands, BC

Mr. Speaker, let us deal with some facts. The Liberal government's record of patronage and backroom deals just got a whole lot worse.

Former Liberal MP Ron Fewchuk was appointed president of the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation in 1997. When he arrived he was not wanted. They would not even give him the keys to the front door. No doubt this appointment was an agreement for giving up his seat in the riding redistribution.

Fewchuk has now been fired after a disastrous year in his new position. As a parting gift from the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans he has thrown in another generous severance package. This is Fewchuk's second golden handshake in 18 months.

Who will pay for it? Will it be the Canadian taxpayer? Will it be the fishermen who finance the marketing board? Either way, it is unconscionable.

The Liberal ship of patronage appointments is adrift at sea. How much money will have to be wasted on Ron Fewchuk and others like him before the government gets the message.

Presence In Gallery
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I wish to draw to the members' attention the presence in the gallery of Mr. Benalia Boulahouadjeb, Minister of Agriculture for the Peoples Democratic Republic of Algeria.

Presence In Gallery
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Hear, hear.

Presence In Gallery
Statements By Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I would also like to draw the attention of hon. members to the presence in the gallery of the Hon. Cathy McGregor, Minister of the Environment of British Columbia.