House of Commons Hansard #148 of the 36th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was farmers.

Topics

Canada Pension Plan
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, that is absolute nonsense. In fact, the provinces and the federal government got together on a list of some 20 appointees from whom the final list was taken. If one takes a look they will see that the vast majority of these people were recommended by the provinces. Unfortunately, the majority of the provinces do not have Liberal governments.

All of these people have outstanding qualities. It does no good to the Canada pension plan or to Canadians for the hon. member to demean some are very high quality Canadians.

Canada Pension Plan
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Scott Brison Kings—Hants, NS

Mr. Speaker, the finance minister knows full well that the final decision rested with him, and the finance minister's final decision was to staff the board with Liberal partisans.

Canadians cannot trust that there will be no political interference in the decisions of this board because clearly there has been political interference in the appointment of this board.

Will the minister clean the slate and ensure that all appointments to this board go through a parliamentary review and approval process?

Canada Pension Plan
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

LaSalle—Émard
Québec

Liberal

Paul Martin Minister of Finance

Mr. Speaker, the provinces have already done this. The fact is that there was a joint stewardship between the provinces and the federal government. There was a committee set up to choose those people who would be nominated. We then went through and picked those people.

I simply go back to what I said before. When we ask Canadians to serve and to give up their time for the benefit of their fellow Canadians, I do not think it does anybody any good for the hon. member to stand in this House and decry what they are doing. They are serving their country and the hon. member should recognize that.

Canada Customs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Liberal

Judi Longfield Whitby—Ajax, ON

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Revenue recently issued a discussion paper on the future direction of the Canada customs and trade administration program.

How will the minister ensure that Canadian businesses and travellers are well served?

Canada Customs
Oral Question Period

2:50 p.m.

Vancouver South—Burnaby
B.C.

Liberal

Herb Dhaliwal Minister of National Revenue

Mr. Speaker, I recently launched a blueprint for Canada customs and revenue.

As our tourism has increased and as our trade has increased there are new challenges for Canada Customs in its trade administration.

We will be consulting with stakeholders, with employees and with Canadians on how to address the new challenges to ensure that we can expand tourism and continue to have increased trade, which is up 50%.

We are consulting, we are listening and we will be responding to Canadians.

Year 2000
Oral Question Period

November 3rd, 1998 / 2:55 p.m.

Reform

John Williams St. Albert, AB

Mr. Speaker, in January 2000 we will see the sequel to the ice storm. There will be people without heat, there will be people without power and there will be people without water. There will even be people who will lose their jobs.

My question is to the Minister of Finance. What is the government's estimate for the number of jobs that will be lost and the drop in the GDP that will be caused by the millennium computer bug?

Year 2000
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Hull—Aylmer
Québec

Liberal

Marcel Massé President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, of course there have been all kinds of forecasts about the January 1, 2000 problem.

There is no doubt that we are trying to prepare the government and the various government departments to be absolutely ready for that date. Even the Bank of Canada is considering increasing the money supply.

The government has made plans to deal with the various contingencies that may happen at that time.

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Bloc

Hélène Alarie Louis-Hébert, QC

Mr. Speaker, the Quebec minister of agriculture is holding a meeting in Montreal with the farming industry to discuss farm incomes and to prepare the upcoming negotiations with the WTO.

Why did the federal Minister of Agriculture, who was informed of this meeting, decide to compete by inviting Canadian and Quebec agriculture leaders the same day to discuss the same topics here in Ottawa?

Agriculture
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we can do two things in one day and I am sure the people in the province of Quebec can too. I respect them for that.

I discussed the date for this meeting with all ministers of agriculture and people in the farm organizations in Canada and they agreed that they could attend the meeting tomorrow afternoon with some of their officials, while some of their other officials are attending other meetings in Montreal.

I will be in Montreal tomorrow morning and I will be in Ottawa tomorrow afternoon.

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

NDP

Peter Mancini Sydney—Victoria, NS

Mr. Speaker, it seems like a long time ago that a few students in British Columbia began to look for justice as a result of what happened at the APEC conference in British Columbia.

The legal complexities of this matter grow daily. The matter goes from the Public Complaints Commission to the federal court and back to the Public Complaints Commission, and yet the students are expected to represent themselves.

If this government will not set up an independent inquiry, will it at least reconsider its position and provide funding for the students' legal counsel?

Apec Inquiry
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Fredericton
New Brunswick

Liberal

Andy Scott Solicitor General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, as I have said many times, the Public Complaints Commission was established so that citizens would have access to a process that would not require that. That is the reason that counsel to the commission is assisting the students in their preparation during this procedure.

The Public Complaints Commission is an independent, arm's length organization established by parliament to do exactly what it is doing right now.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Independent

John Nunziata York South—Weston, ON

Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

The minister will know that Canada's Walk of Fame in Toronto is an opportunity to showcase Canadian talent both here in Canada and internationally. The minister showed her support to the inaugural Walk of Fame last year in Toronto.

Can the Walk of Fame count on the minister's and the government's continued support for this most worthwhile initiative?

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Hamilton East
Ontario

Liberal

Sheila Copps Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, no, that was not a planted question.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Some hon. members

Oh, oh.

Canadian Heritage
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Liberal

Sheila Copps Hamilton East, ON

I will say that the launching of the Walk of Fame in Toronto was an absolute first for Canada. It was a blockbuster success. I am very pleased to tell the House that there are a number of Canadian cities that are looking at the option of establishing a similar walk of fame. I think it falls very nicely in line with the millennium. We as a country have to start to show the world our heroes.

That is exactly what was done in Toronto, and I think it could be done in Montreal, Vancouver and throughout Canada.