House of Commons Hansard #96 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was natural.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Winnipeg North—St. Paul, MB

Mr. Speaker, I wish to present a petition on behalf of my constituents which references Bill C-23. The petitioners wish to affirm the opposite sex definition of marriage in legislation to ensure that marriage is recognized as a unique institution.

I received the petition after the bill had passed the House. However, I would like to inform my constituents that, indeed, paragraph 1.1 of the amended legislation passed by the House states:

For greater certainty, the amendments made by this Act do not affect the meaning of the word “marriage”, that is, the lawful union of one man and one woman to the exclusion of all others.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I hardly think it is appropriate to deliver a petition and then talk about how the government addressed the whole issue in a piece of legislation. I do not think that kind of comment goes with delivering a petition.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

We get a lot of comments with petitions, but I agree that it does seem unusual for the hon. member to say how the petition has been answered. On the other hand, some hon. members present petitions and have to say that it is too late because the petition is late, and make comments about the fact that legislation has passed. It is a fine line.

I will take the matter under advisement and review again what the hon. member said in light of the precedents and the eminent discourses that occur on this subject in Marleau and Montpetit, which we all read with such enthusiasm.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Mississauga Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Carolyn Parrish Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Public Works and Government Services

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

12:05 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill S-10, an act to amend the National Defence Act, the DNA Identification Act and the Criminal Code, be read the second time and referred to a committee.

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:05 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

When debate was interrupted for question period, the hon. member for Cumberland—Colchester had the floor. He has 14 minutes remaining for his remarks.

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:05 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, when Government Orders was interrupted I was talking about the amendments that address the taking of DNA samples in the DNA Identification Act, which contains a list of designated offences which provide that DNA samples may be taken from any individual convicted of any one of those offences that I was talking about for forensic analysis.

The list was divided into two types of offences, primary and secondary. In the case of primary offences, it is mandatory for samples to be taken at the time of conviction, except in exceptional circumstances. These offences consist mainly of the most serious and violent offences, as well as sex offences, which are the offences where DNA evidence may be of the most assistance. The list includes offences such as incest, murder, manslaughter, assault with a weapon, causing bodily harm, sexual assault, et cetera.

For a secondary offence case it is not mandatory to take a sample, so the crown must satisfy the judge that it is in the interests of the public safety to take such a sample. These are less serious offences in which DNA analysis cannot always be used to solve a crime or prevent other crimes. They include such offences as using explosives, breaking and entering with intent, arson, assaulting a peace officer, robbery and hostage taking, among others.

Under Bill S-10 this list, which limits the situations in which DNA samples may be taken, now applies to members of the military who have been convicted of these offences. The amendments made by Bill S-10 do not change the key elements of the DNA Identification Act, but rather their objective is to strengthen certain principles of the act and to remedy some major failings identified by members of the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs.

The provisions of the new act include, first, that the DNA profiles of offenders convicted of a designated offence who are subject to the Code of Service Discipline will now be included in the national DNA data bank. Second, within five years after the act comes into force, a review of the provisions and operation of the act will be undertaken by a committee of the Senate, of the House of Commons, or of both Houses of Parliament.

Third, a report on the operations of the data bank will then be submitted each year by the commissioner of the RCMP.

Fourth, there will be a clear statement that DNA profiles and samples of bodily substances taken in order to establish DNA profiles may be used only for the purposes of the administration of the act.

With the implementation of Bill S-10, Bill C-3 will now become more effective, as the two pieces of legislation will work together harmoniously to improve management of the national DNA data bank and ensure a greater respect for Canadians' privacy. The DNA data bank is an extremely powerful tool with important repercussions for our justice system and our society.

The provisions of Bill S-10 will ensure greater respect for the privacy of Canadians by setting very clear guidelines for police and the courts regarding the use of DNA profiles in criminal investigations.

The Progressive Conservative Party supports this bill, as it will help bring our society ever closer to achieving a sense of public safety.

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Is the House ready for the question?

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Question.

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The question is on the motion. Is it the pleasure of the House to adopt the motion?

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

National Defence Act
Government Orders

12:10 p.m.

The Deputy Speaker

Accordingly, the bill stands referred to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights.

(Motion agreed to, bill read the second time and referred to a committee)

Income Tax Conventions Implementation Act, 1999
Government Orders

May 12th, 2000 / 12:10 p.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton for the Minister of Finance

moved that Bill S-3, an act to implement an agreement, conventions and protocols between Canada and Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Algeria, Bulgaria, Portugal, Uzbekistan, Jordan, Japan and Luxembourg for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income, be read the second time and referred to a committee.