House of Commons Hansard #96 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was dna.

Topics

Nisga'A Treaty
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Provencher
Manitoba

Liberal

David Iftody Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Mr. Speaker, I can tell the House that yes, the Nisga'a people have ratified the agreement after one of the most prolonged debates in the House of Commons.

After 100 years of the Nisga'a people knocking on the door to come back into Canada, I am proud to say that today at this very hour Canadians from across the country are gathering in the Nass Valley to celebrate their entry back into Canada. We welcome them home.

Prisons
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Reform

Darrel Stinson Okanagan—Shuswap, BC

Mr. Speaker, the people of Nass Valley never left this country.

Canadian taxpayers have spent $60,000 for scanners in federal prisons that can detect the smallest amount of drugs. Yet when the bells and whistles go off, these people are not arrested nor are the drugs confiscated.

My question is for the solicitor general. If a person visiting an inmate at a federal prison is caught with illegal drugs, the drugs are not even seized and that person is not charged. Why?

Prisons
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Erie—Lincoln
Ontario

Liberal

John Maloney Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

Mr. Speaker, the question posed seems very difficult to understand. Perhaps I could have more particulars before responding to it. When a criminal offence is committed then charges should be laid.

Amateur Sport
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bloc

Caroline St-Hilaire Longueuil, QC

Mr. Speaker, barely two months ago, the Secretary of State for Amateur Sport announced with great fanfare that there would be increased funding for elite sport athletes and promised that they would receive their cheque by May 1.

He said “The athletes will not have to think about how many Kraft Dinners they can eat anymore”.

The athletes are still waiting. How does the Secretary of State for Amateur Sport explain this delay? Has the Y2K bug caught up with the secretary or is he simply having a hard time meeting his commitments?

Amateur Sport
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Bourassa
Québec

Liberal

Denis Coderre Secretary of State (Amateur Sport)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for her question.

The Bloc Quebecois was pleased as well with our March 20 announcement. Of course, there have been problems. I have waited neither for the hon. member to put her question nor for the news in order to act on the problem.

I personally called the athletes who were having problems in this regard. I can say that as of May 9, at 8.45 p.m., all the cheques were in the mail, and I apologize for the inconvenience.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of National Defence.

Two days ago the minister said in the House that to his knowledge there are no U.S. nuclear weapons in Canadian waters, but that the U.S. refuses to confirm or deny the presence of these weapons.

I want to ask the minister, why is our military now training for a possible U.S. nuclear weapons accident in Canada at Nanoose Bay or possibly in Halifax? Why will the minister not stand up for Canadians as the New Zealand government has done and tell the United States to keep its nuclear weapons out of Canadian waters?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, the United States does not bring its nuclear weapons into Canadian waters, into Nanoose, into the testing range.

For decades we have been providing a testing range but it does not test nuclear weapons or any warheads. It only goes through testing in that range.

Our personnel are trained in case there could be a nuclear accident somewhere off our coast because there are submarines and other vessels travelling on the high seas. The United States Navy does not indicate whether it has nuclear weapons on board. That has been a longstanding policy. There is nothing new about this.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

NDP

Svend Robinson Burnaby—Douglas, BC

Mr. Speaker, perhaps I can give the minister another chance to say no to the Pentagon hawks.

His colleague the foreign affairs minister said last week, “The U.S. should refrain from unilateral decisions on a national missile defence system that could jeopardize the integrity of the ABM treaty regime and have a negative impact on nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation”.

I want to ask the minister, does he agree with the foreign affairs minister? Is he prepared to join with the foreign affairs minister in urging the United States to get off the fence and to say a very clear and emphatic no to the national missile defence system?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

York Centre
Ontario

Liberal

Art Eggleton Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, in fact it has already said yes to the national missile defence system through legislation that has been passed and approved by the United States Congress and by the President. It is a matter of the testing that continues to be done to perfect the technology, then a final decision on deployment will be made at that point in time.

No final decision has been made with respect to that. Canada has not been asked. Certainly the matters that the hon. member raises and which have been raised by the foreign affairs minister are very legitimate concerns, and concerns that need to be addressed. There are other concerns. The defence, the security and the relationship between Canada and the United States must also be taken into consideration.

Grain Transportation
Oral Question Period

May 12th, 2000 / 11:50 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Bill Casey Cumberland—Colchester, NS

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transport.

Further to the $175 million announcement for western provinces' rural roads, what provinces qualify for this money? Will they be required to cost share in the money and who will distribute the $175 million?

Grain Transportation
Oral Question Period

11:50 a.m.

Don Valley East
Ontario

Liberal

David Collenette Minister of Transport

Mr. Speaker, the details of this program are still being worked out but there is a precedent with the money that was put in to compensate western provinces under the WGTA reforms. We will be looking at that in the next little while.

We do hope that the provinces will do their bit as well to assist with the rebuilding of these grain roads. The $175 million that we are allocating is new money and I think it will be well spent.

Youth
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Liberal

Mac Harb Ottawa Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, in the Speech from the Throne the Government of Canada committed to establish a national exchange program so that Canadian youth from different parts of the country could participate in programs and learn about the country's diversity and the different languages and cultures that exist within the mosaic of Canada. I ask the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage what happened to that proposal and when can we see some action on the ground?

Youth
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, we live in a vast country, a country rich in natural resources and in its geography as well as in its cultural diversity and in the linguistic duality it is important to discover.

This is why two weeks ago, the Minister of Canadian Heritage announced a further $15 million, which was provided in the budget this year, for interchange Canada, in order to permit young people to take part in the some 300 exchange programs in this country to enable our young people to discover each other, to discover communities from sea to sea and to appreciate this great and beautiful country of Canada.

Forestry
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Reform

John Duncan Vancouver Island North, BC

Mr. Speaker, the federal government sponsored the film l'Erreur boréale which is a one-sided anti-industry diatribe against Quebec forest management designed for an international audience. At the same time the Minister of Natural Resources professes to support forest practices in Canada but funding seems to be a problem. Why is the government so reluctant to fund promotion of our world class forestry standards internationally?

Forestry
Oral Question Period

11:55 a.m.

Prince Edward—Hastings
Ontario

Liberal

Lyle Vanclief Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

Mr. Speaker, we know that there are concerns not only in Canada but around the world about our forestry standards. It is very important because the export of forestry products is important for Canada, as it is domestically in Canada, for economic and environmental reasons. It is very important that we, as we can, demonstrate to the rest of the world that we practise sound environmental and forestry standards.