House of Commons Hansard #96 of the 36th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was dna.

Topics

Pay Equity
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Liberal

Marlene Catterall Ottawa West—Nepean, ON

Mr. Speaker, public service employees in the government were very glad when we were able to reach a settlement of the pay equity complaint last year. Now we find out that many people doing the same work for the same federal government and belonging to the same union are not covered by this settlement.

What is the President of the Treasury Board doing to work toward pay equity for these employees of so-called separate employers?

Pay Equity
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Westmount—Ville-Marie
Québec

Liberal

Lucienne Robillard President of the Treasury Board and Minister responsible for Infrastructure

Mr. Speaker, during the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal hearings on the pay equity complaint, all parties, including the Human Rights Commission and the Public Service Alliance of Canada, agreed that the complaint did not apply to separate employers. The court order applies therefore strictly to employees for whom Treasury Board is the employer.

However, we have also received official requests from four separate employers, including the Office of the Auditor General of Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the Public Service Staff Relations Board, to look at a similar request. The Treasury Board Secretariat is reviewing the situation with them.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Reform

Peter Goldring Edmonton East, AB

Mr. Speaker, depleted uranium, a radioactive nuclear waste, is a common weapons component on today's battlefields.

A report released by the Royal Military College in Kingston informs us that depleted uranium fallout may lead to cancer, mutations and unacceptable levels of toxins.

Will the Minister of National Defence call for our military to discontinue the use and stockpiling of depleted uranium for the sake of our returning soldiers' health? Has the minister yet enacted any of the report's recommendations?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle
Québec

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, I want to reassure the hon. member opposite and tell him that the Canadian forces never use depleted uranium.

I also want to tell him that, if there are members of the Canadian forces who think they have been poisoned by this product, they should simply get tested. The Canadian forces will pay for the tests.

The Economy
Oral Question Period

May 12th, 2000 / 11:40 a.m.

Reform

Philip Mayfield Cariboo—Chilcotin, BC

Mr. Speaker, the best measure of a country's economic progress in international terms is in the value of its currency.

When the Liberals took office in 1993 the Canadian dollar was worth 78 cents U.S. This morning it is worth 67.25 cents U.S., a decline of about 14%, and see-sawing back and forth, struggling for even this poor performance.

Could the Minister of Finance tell Canadians why even in the midst of the economic boom of the past several years he has not been able to protect the value of the Canadian dollar?

The Economy
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

Willowdale
Ontario

Liberal

Jim Peterson Secretary of State (International Financial Institutions)

Mr. Speaker, what the hon. member failed to mention was that against all other currencies in the world except for the American dollar, the Canadian dollar is very strong.

The economic fundamentals in Canada over the past seven years have gone from a situation in which the Wall Street Journal has referred to Canada as being in the class of a third world country to what The Economist of London called the economic miracle of the western world.

We are very proud of the steps that we have put in place, tough though they may have been, in order to restore the fiscal—

The Economy
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

The Deputy Speaker

The hon. member for Halifax West.

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:40 a.m.

NDP

Gordon Earle Halifax West, NS

Mr. Speaker, a recent defence audit condemns contracting out. Instead of making decisions based on what is best for the taxpayers' dollars, Canadians, those abroad served by our forces and for the forces and civilian men and women who work so hard for Canadians, the Liberal government seems to base decisions on how many jobs it can cut and how it can whittle down the union.

Will the defence minister learn from this audit and put a moratorium on any current plans to contract out more work to prevent us from being ashamed by yet another audit a few years down the road?

National Defence
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Pontiac—Gatineau—Labelle
Québec

Liberal

Robert Bertrand Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of National Defence

Mr. Speaker, in the 1990s DND had to dramatically reduce the number of CF members and its civilian employees. Thousands of people accepted a departure incentive package to leave the department. Only a very small number returned to DND. The vast majority of these employees are term, casual or contractors.

In 1992-93 there were few restrictions on Canadian forces members who took a departure incentive from finding employment with the public service or re-enrolling in the Canadian forces.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, the government is presiding over the destruction of CBC regional broadcasting. I am holding in my hands the red book one and two, 1993 and 1996. Members can holler all they want, but I am going to quote from the red book which is perfectly legitimate. The Liberals promised in 1993, “Finally, a Liberal government will be committed to stable multi-year financing for national cultural institutions,” including the CBC.

Where is that promise? Did it get lost with the GST promise?

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Ottawa—Vanier
Ontario

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Canadian Heritage

Mr. Speaker, funding for the CBC has been stable since 1998. We stabilized the funding over a five year period.

If the member is not aware of that, perhaps he should have done more homework. Since the 1998-99 fiscal year, CBC Radio Canada's funding has been stabilized and in some cases increased.

Employment
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Progressive Conservative

Greg Thompson Charlotte, NB

Mr. Speaker, I do not accept that answer. I am going to go to a minister who may have an answer on a program that was hugely successful. I will direct my question to the human resources ministry.

There is a program in New Brunswick called NB job corps. It is a joint program between the province of New Brunswick and the federal government aimed at putting older workers into the workplace. I am talking about those workers who have problems finding work because of age. What is the status of that program? Do we have any assurances that it may be developed along—

Employment
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

The Speaker

The hon. Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources Development.

Employment
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Oakville
Ontario

Liberal

Bonnie Brown Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Human Resources Development

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for his question and the courtesy of alerting me to the subject he wished to speak about today.

We were pleased to fund NB job corps with the Government of New Brunswick. Over the five year life of the project we will have assisted more than 1,300 workers between the ages of 50 and 65. We are also pleased with the program's track record. Lessons learned from this corps will be valuable in addressing the future needs of older workers.

We continue the discussions with our provincial counterparts to address the needs of older workers in a more general way. We will certainly consider the member's suggestion.

Nisga'A Treaty
Oral Question Period

11:45 a.m.

Liberal

Guy St-Julien Abitibi, QC

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

In December, the House adopted the Nisga'a treaty. Last month, the treaty was ratified by the Senate. Can the minister tell the House whether the treaty was well received by the Nisga'a and whether they signed the agreement?