House of Commons Hansard #41 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was provinces.

Topics

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, it also gives me great pleasure to introduce a wonderful petition by my good constituents of Sheet Harbour and Port Dufferin, Nova Scotia.

They are very concerned about the rise of poverty in Canada. They would like the government to bring forth a budget that eliminates child poverty.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, I have another petition on the question of health care.

The petitioners of Victoria, British Columbia are very concerned about Alberta's bill 11 and the creeping privatization of health care in Canada. They pray that parliament will have some courage and will stop the privatization of health care.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, workers at the North Sydney postal terminal are very concerned about the fact that many of their jobs will transferred to New Brunswick.

The petitioners pray that parliament not close the North Sydney postal terminal.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore, NS

Finally, Mr. Speaker, on behalf of thousands of Canadians, I present two great petitions on their concerns that Canada will not be releasing the full text of the FTAA.

They pray that parliament ensures democracy will rule and that they will be able to see the FTAA text before it is tabled and seen by other countries.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Gouk Kootenay—Boundary—Okanagan, BC

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions today. The first is from petitioners in British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

They join with thousands of other petitioners who have already petitioned the government to request the funding and training necessary for the provision of quality end of life care.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jim Gouk Kootenay—Boundary—Okanagan, BC

Mr. Speaker, my second petition today joins previous petitioners in calling upon parliament to implement a national strategy to create a non-adversarial marital separation code.

The object of the code would be to reduce tension and acrimony among the parties and particularly to protect the children involved.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Andy Burton Skeena, BC

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased today to present a petition to the House signed by 1,300 British Columbians regarding their concern over genetically modified organisms.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

April 2nd, 2001 / 3:10 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, I ask that all questions be allowed to stand.

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

Is that agreed?

Questions On The Order Paper
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Request For Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The Chair has notice of an application for emergency debate from the hon. member for Brandon—Souris.

Request For Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Rick Borotsik Brandon—Souris, MB

Mr. Speaker, under Standing Order 52 I have filed for an emergency debate regarding a very serious issue facing Canadians. This would be a non-partisan debate, Mr. Speaker, if you should be as forthcoming as to allow it. It has to do with the potential problems the country may face with respect to foot and mouth disease.

We have an $11 billion livestock industry in Canada. We do not want this to be fearmongering. Nor do I wish it to be a partisan issue. I simply want a venue in which members of parliament can put forward precautionary measures that could and should be taken by all Canadians, not only by those in the industry. The measures could also be taken by tourists who come and go throughout the country and by people who import and export on a continuous basis.

I ask you, Mr. Speaker, and your office to please allow members of the House the opportunity to put forward the protective measures necessary for this terrible disease.

The minister of agriculture has today, with CFIA, put forward an advertising campaign. I applaud the CFIA and the department for allowing Canadians to have a better understanding of what we are dealing with. What better place for parliamentarians to debate the issue than in the House? That is why I ask you, Mr. Speaker, in the good graces of your office, to allow us to do so.

Request For Emergency Debate
Routine Proceedings

3:10 p.m.

The Speaker

I thank the hon. member for Brandon—Souris for bringing the matter to the attention of the Chair. I have carefully considered his request and have decided to allow it. The debate will take place tomorrow night at 8 p.m. I trust hon. members will govern themselves accordingly.

The House resumed consideration of the motion that Bill C-18, an act to amend the Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act, be read the second time and referred to a committee.

Federal-Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act
Government Orders

3:10 p.m.

Progressive Conservative

Gerald Keddy South Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to discuss Bill C-18 regarding equalization from the federal government to the provinces. The bill, if passed, and I expect the government will be able to get its members into the House for an important vote like this one, would lift the cap off equalization payments for the year 2000-01. Quite simply, that is what the bill is about.

It is not a complicated piece of legislation. It deals specifically with an issue and certainly would be a help and a boon to the provinces that need increased equalization payments, especially in this fiscal year.

As we are debating this bill today we know that the four Atlantic premiers, including one of the only two Liberal premiers in the country, are meeting in Charlottetown to discuss equalization payments. Certainly what they are asking the government to do and what we are expecting they will ask the government to do is permanently lift the cap on equalization. There are a number of reasons the government should seriously consider measures such as lifting the cap on a permanent basis.

The concept of providing effectively level taxation or similar levels of taxation and services across the country is perhaps the very cornerstone of Canadian social policy. That was said in the House not long ago by our finance critic, the member for Kings—Hants. I would like to state—