House of Commons Hansard #41 of the 37th Parliament, 1st Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was research.

Topics

Foreign Affairs
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Winnipeg North—St. Paul
Manitoba

Liberal

Rey D. Pagtakhan Secretary of State (Asia-Pacific)

Mr. Speaker, Canada believes that this war can only be brought to a peaceful end through a political settlement that satisfies the legitimate aspirations of all Sri Lankans and preserves their country's unity and territorial integrity.

Hence, Canada is encouraged by indications that formal peace talks being brokered by Norway may soon begin. Canada supports Norway's efforts and is willing to play an active role in the peace process upon invitation by both parties.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, with the United States withdrawing from the Kyoto protocol, the government so far has not answered the question about its commitment to the protocol.

How does the government plan to reach the 6% CO2 target and at what cost to Canadians.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, the question is interesting because of the previous position taken by the Alliance Party, which has always been to oppose the Kyoto protocol.

Our view of the matter is that the international negotiations remain ongoing. Canada will play a very constructive role in those negotiations to try to achieve an international agreement that will work for Canada and for the world.

In the meantime, domestically we have already announced our action plan, which is $1.1 billion that will take 65 megatons of carbon out of our atmosphere.

The Environment
Oral Question Period

2:55 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Bob Mills Red Deer, AB

Mr. Speaker, partnership is the key to successful environmental programs. The fatal mistake that the government made in the negotiations of the Kyoto protocol was that it did not consult with the provinces, the industry and the Canadian people. They were not consulted and they were not listened to.

This time, before the government makes commitments to any international agreement on CO2, will it publicly consult all the stakeholders?

The Environment
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Wascana
Saskatchewan

Liberal

Ralph Goodale Minister of Natural Resources and Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board

Mr. Speaker, a federal-provincial-territorial process was conducted before the Kyoto protocol.

Since the Kyoto protocol, in complete collaboration with all the provinces, all the territories, all the municipalities, the private sector, the scientific community and environmental organizations, we have had two years of consultation. Some 450 individual Canadians representing every aspect of Canadian life have been involved.

Based upon that we have a Canadian implementation strategy. We have business plan and we have invested $1.1 billion to achieve the objective.

Prime Minister
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Bloc

Serge Cardin Sherbrooke, QC

Mr. Speaker, 54% of the Liberals who were polled about the Prime Minister's behaviour in the Auberge Grand-Mère issue feel that an inquiry should be held.

Even members of his own caucus are wondering about the contradictions between the Prime Minister's statements and the documents, or between the Prime Minister's statements and those of Yvon Duhaime.

Is the government not concerned about the behaviour of its Prime Minister, and should it not put pressure on him to accept that light be shed on this issue?

Prime Minister
Oral Question Period

3 p.m.

Windsor West
Ontario

Liberal

Herb Gray Deputy Prime Minister

Absolutely not, Mr. Speaker. There is no conflict of interest and the Prime Minister did table the documents requested by the Bloc and the other opposition parties.

Now, they are not prepared to make good on their commitment to accept these documents and move on to other issues.

Quebecers and Canadians are disappointed with the opposition, because it is not asking real questions about real issues. We in government are the ones working on problems and proposing real solutions.

Government Response To Petition
Routine Proceedings

3 p.m.

Scarborough—Rouge River
Ontario

Liberal

Derek Lee Parliamentary Secretary to Leader of the Government in the House of Commons

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to one petition.

Committees Of The House
Routine Proceedings

3 p.m.

Liberal

Ovid Jackson Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, ON

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of tabling, in both official languages, the first report of the Standing Committee of Transport and Government Operations regarding the order of reference of February 21, 2001, in relation to Bill S-2, an act respecting marine liability, and to validate certain bylaws and regulations. The committee has considered Bill S-2 and reports the bill without amendment.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

April 2nd, 2001 / 3 p.m.

NDP

Judy Wasylycia-Leis Winnipeg North Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to table a petition signed by a number of Canadians who are concerned about the situation facing rural route mail couriers today.

The petitioners are concerned about the working conditions of mail couriers. They point out that these hard working individuals make less than minimum wage. They are not allowed to bargain collectively. Their working conditions are reminiscent of another era.

They call upon the government to repeal the section of the Canada Post Corporation Act which prohibits rural route mail couriers from having collective bargaining rights.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Liberal

Anita Neville Winnipeg South Centre, MB

Mr. Speaker, I have the pleasure today to present a petition on behalf of many citizens of Manitoba, several of whom live in the riding of Winnipeg South Centre.

The undersigned residents of Canada draw the attention of the House to the fact that the Government of Canada may be asked to support the U.S. national missile defence program to be operated by the North American aerospace defence command.

The petitioners call upon parliament to play a leadership role in banning nuclear weapons in missile flight tests and to declare that Canada objects to the national missile defence program of the United States.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36 I am proud to present this petition which is signed by numerous members of my constituency.

The undersigned appeal to the Parliament of Canada to strongly urge the—

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

The Speaker

Order, please. I am reluctant to interrupt the hon. member, but I am sure he knows it is not order to read petitions. He can give a brief summary. I would invite him to comply with the rules in every respect.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Moore Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, BC

Fair enough, Mr. Speaker. I am presenting this petition on behalf of a number of my constituents.

They are asking parliament to urge the government of China and its president, Jiang Zemin, to release Falun Dafa practitioners from jail and to encourage an open dialogue to allow them to practise their chosen faith in their chosen way through freedom of religion.

Petitions
Routine Proceedings

3:05 p.m.

NDP

Peter Stoffer Sackville—Musquodoboit Valley—Eastern Shore, NS

Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise in the House to present a petition from the good people of Nova Scotia who are very concerned about oil and gas exploration off the coast of Cape Breton.

They pray that parliament investigate the powers and the undemocratic actions of the unelected Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board and the National Energy Board.