House of Commons Hansard #38 of the 37th Parliament, 2nd Session. (The original version is on Parliament's site.) The word of the day was million.

Topics

2:05 p.m.

The Speaker

As is our practice on Wednesday we will now sing O Canada, and we will be led by the hon. member for Saint John.

[Editor's Note: Members sang the national anthem]

National Parks
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Peter Adams Peterborough, ON

Mr. Speaker, on November 28, 1885, Canada's first national park was established around Banff, Alberta. This was an extraordinary far-sighted fact by the government and people of Canada.

Since then our park system has spread across the country to deliberately include a wide variety of natural heritage. Also, the protection, which our national parks provide for plants and animals, has been strengthened. Our national parks are sanctuaries for plants and animals, investments in the biological diversity of Canada and the planet.

I urge all members to celebrate the establishment of Banff National Park by pledging that our generation will build on the work of our ancestors by further extending and strengthening the national park system with marine conservation areas to provide similar sanctuaries in the oceans.

The Speech from the Throne pledged that we would do this. Let us do it.

Firearms Registry
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Jay Hill Prince George—Peace River, BC

Yesterday, Mr. Speaker, Canadians found out the true cost of the useless Liberal firearm registry. The Auditor General presented her report detailing a $1 billion price tag, yet the Liberal government assured Canadian voters it would cost only $2 million. These cost overruns were quietly swept under the carpet, hiding the waste from Parliament and taxpayers.

Now that the Auditor General has confirmed what the Canadian Alliance has claimed for years, will the government scrap the registry? Not likely.

What else is the government hiding from Canadians? We now know the Liberals are also hiding the true costs of implementing the Kyoto accord. As Canadians line up at hospitals and clinics across the country waiting for critical medical services, Liberals continue to waste billions of dollars on their pet projects. How many more gong shows do we have to sit through?

Canadians are tired of their standard of living being constantly reduced by an arrogant Liberal government that blows billions of dollars. Taxpayers deserve better.

Economic Development
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Gérard Binet Frontenac—Mégantic, QC

Mr. Speaker, the town of Thetford Mines is trying to diversify its industry and open its economy to new market opportunities. To this end, various regional stakeholders are promoting a project that would make the Amiante RCM the Quebec capital of the oleochemical industry.

There is enormous potential here, and I want to acknowledge the promoters of this kind of initiative to create new and innovative sectors of activity and, in so doing, create new jobs.

On November 8, Canada Economic Development contributed $81,500 toward the implementation of a strategic development plan for this industry.

This contribution is a good example of our interest in supporting projects which will protect and improve the environment, while repositioning this region to deal with new technologies. This is great news for Frontenac—Mégantic.

Ottawa—Vanier Community
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Mauril Bélanger Ottawa—Vanier, ON

Mr. Speaker, today I would like to pay homage to three pillars of the Ottawa—Vanier community, who have passed away recently: Laurette Roy, Paul St-Georges and Robert Madore.

They were exemplary in their dedication to our community. Ms. Roy, Mr. St-Georges and Mr. Madore were always there to lend a helping hand to individuals and organizations in need.

They will be sorely missed at the Centre Pauline-Charron, the Canadian Legion (branch 462), the Knights of Columbus (council 5571), the Optimist Club and the Institut canadien-français d'Ottawa, among others.

It is impossible to truly honour these three citizens in one minute. Nonetheless, I wanted the House to know that the people of Ottawa—Vanier will not soon forget them.

I wish to express my sincerest condolences to the members of their respective families.

Fred Ward
Statements by Members

2:05 p.m.

Liberal

Janko Peric Cambridge, ON

Mr. Speaker, last week my riding lost a former city counsellor known for his gentle nature and determination that was key in helping to establish the new City of Cambridge almost 30 years ago.

Fred Ward served with the Perth regiment during the second world war, was a member of Branch 121 of the Royal Canadian Legion, and a former member of the Galt Kinsman Club.

A lifelong resident of Galt, Ward served two terms on Galt council, served on regional government , and was elected to the first ever Cambridge city council.

I would personally like to extend my condolences to his wife Irene, his son Wayne, his daughter Sandra, and his extended family and countless friends in Cambridge.

Member for LaSalle—Émard
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

James Rajotte Edmonton Southwest, AB

Mr. Speaker, official Ottawa was all abuzz this week about the new suggestion from the member for LaSalle—Émard that the federal government should sell its share of Petro-Canada to help pay for climate change technology.

That is an interesting suggestion but it sounds familiar. It sounds familiar because this is actually not a new suggestion. In fact, the finance committee and the Canadian Alliance recommended selling those shares in the 2001 prebudget report to the then finance minister. Unfortunately, the finance minister at that time ignored the good advice in his next budget.

Who was the finance minister who ignored this advice? It was the very same member for LaSalle—Émard who now suddenly endorses this idea and expects Canadians to accept this as his new brilliant proposal.

This is one more example of this prime minister wannabe just flipping his position to suit the latest fad. The former finance minister has done so many flips and flops that it makes one wonder whether he is truly seeking to become prime minister or if he is instead practising for his new career as a performer with Cirque de Soleil.

Violence Against Women
Statements by Members

December 4th, 2002 / 2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Liza Frulla Verdun—Saint-Henri—Saint-Paul—Pointe Saint-Charles, QC

Mr. Speaker, today is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women . This is, first of all, a day to commemorate an act of hate and violence against women. But violence against women did not start with the death of 14 women at École Polytechnique in Montreal, and unfortunately did not end there either.

Violence against women knows no boundaries and often deprives its victims of the ability to speak up or stand up for themselves. Some women experience it daily and fear for their lives and that of their children and family members. Others, like more than 60 women from Vancouver's downtown east side, have simply gone missing, because someone thought that they did not matter or would not be missed.

We are all human beings, regardless of our social standing, race, religion or gender, and all lives are precious. We must all ensure that women are never alone or forgotten, especially on this National Day—

Violence Against Women
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Repentigny.

Berthier—Montcalm Byelection
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Bloc

Benoît Sauvageau Repentigny, QC

Mr. Speaker, the tune being sung these days by the Liberal candidate in the byelection in Berthier—Montcalm is a well known Liberal tune in Quebec: silence.

While the ADQ, PLQ and PQ unanimously passed a resolution in the National Assembly of Quebec, demanding that federal health transfers be unconditional, an embarrassed Liberal candidate saw his federal Liberal friends reiterate their intention to set out conditions.

Worse yet, instead of going ahead with the health care reform, the Liberals decided the best thing was to further centralize by creating a new bureaucracy in Ottawa to deal with health.

After cutting nearly $150 million in health alone in the riding of Berthier—Montcalm and in Lanaudière, the Liberals now want to pass themselves off as saviours. Having set the fire, they are now trying to put it out.

We have here a Liberal candidate who says he has to defend what is indefensible. It is clearer now why this candidate once was a contributor to the Bloc Quebecois. Deep down, he knows full well that the Bloc is the only party in Ottawa—

Berthier—Montcalm Byelection
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

The Speaker

The hon. member for Parkdale—High Park.

Louis Applebaum Composers Award
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Liberal

Sarmite Bulte Parkdale—High Park, ON

Mr. Speaker, I wish to congratulate two of my constituents, Alexina Louie and Alex Pauk, who on November 29, 2002, were awarded the 2002 Louis Applebaum Composers Award.

The Louis Applebaum award was established in 1998 to recognize excellence in music composition. Alex and Alexina are the second recipients of this award for their musical compositions in film and in television.

Ms. Louie is well-known for her compositions, such as The Scarlet Prince , and has been recognized with a Juno Award and the Order of Ontario. I am also proud to inform the House that Alexina is one of the recipients of the Queen's Jubilee medals in my riding.

Alex Pauk founded the Esprit Orchestra in 1983 and is also its conductor and artistic director. He has written orchestral, choral, chamber and electronic music which has been performed and broadcast throughout Canada, the United States, Europe, Russia and Latin America.

Their compositions, both individually and together, have enriched the music world both in Canada and abroad.

I congratulate them on their achievements and look forward to their creations in the years to come.

Kyoto Protocol
Statements by Members

2:10 p.m.

Canadian Alliance

Rob Anders Calgary West, AB

Mr. Speaker, on Monday the MP for Edmonton Southeast showed Albertans his true colours. He is going to vote in favour of Kyoto, despite vowing previously to quit rather than support the accord.

Albertans have long memories and are not so easily duped by displays of debatable allegiances. One need only be reminded of the 1993 election results and the stand taken by Alberta Tory MPs who threatened to quit over the GST. Of course jumping ship and joining the Liberals is another strategy of a political shape changer.

Actions speak louder than words. This action, voting in favour of Kyoto, an accord which will cripple the economy and put Albertans and other Canadians out of work, is sheer economic suicide.

Now we learn that the only other Alberta Liberal MP will also vote in favour of the Kyoto accord.

Betraying one's constituency to hold on to a cabinet position shows where Liberal loyalties lie.

Persons with Disabilities
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

Liberal

Tony Tirabassi Niagara Centre, ON

Mr. Speaker, during this week of activities acknowledging persons with disabilities, we should be reminded that all Canadians should have the opportunity to display their talents and their skills. Canada needs, and must have, access to these talents and skills in the knowledge based economy.

I am encouraged that the government committed in the Speech from the Throne in September to work with provinces to fast track a comprehensive labour market agreement to remove barriers to working and learning for persons with disabilities.

As we work together we are building a more inclusive society that supports independent living and sustainable livelihoods.

Fair Vote Canada
Statements by Members

2:15 p.m.

NDP

Lorne Nystrom Regina—Qu'Appelle, SK

Mr. Speaker, last week was the second anniversary of the 2000 election, an election that handed most of the power to a party for which, once again, only a minority of the Canadian people voted.

In the wake of this distorted outcome, Fair Vote Canada launched a grassroots campaign to make every Canadian's vote count.

Just an hour ago the president of Fair Vote Canada, Doris Anderson, joined with opposition members, including myself, calling on the government to take real action on electoral reform.

The last time the House of Commons voted on proportional representation was in 1923 when a cautious Mackenzie King led 20 of his fellow Liberals in supporting PR. Canadians think it is high time for another vote.

According to Environics, support for PR has risen to 62%. The success of this campaign shows what can be achieved through multipartisan cooperation, both inside and outside the House.

On behalf of my party, I salute the perseverance of Doris Anderson and Fair Vote Canada and its supporters, and I can assure them of our continued support on proportional representation in Canada.